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This is a sub-selection from 3GB a month, slightly more?


system001

@qwest.net
reply to openbox9

Re: 3GB a month, slightly more?

currently the cities decide what isp's are in their city and what section of the city they are in. with fiber optics we have had the ability to carry far more than what is being allowed. The cities deliberately limit service in an area. as for the math it is correct. 60 x 60 x 24 = 86,400 seconds in a day, and at 7mb's per second that comes to 604,800 mb's a day or 604.8 gigs a day. limiting isp's to 1 million customers means that there would have to be more isp's created which equates to more competition, which equate to lower prices for faster service.

openbox9
Premium
join:2004-01-26
Germany
kudos:2
said by system001 :

currently the cities decide what isp's are in their city and what section of the city they are in.
Are you discussing franchise agreements for video providers? Or perhaps the use of the ROW?
said by system001 :

with fiber optics we have had the ability to carry far more than what is being allowed. The cities deliberately limit service in an area.
Source? I seriously doubt any city limits fiber optic throughput.
said by system001 :

as for the math it is correct. 60 x 60 x 24 = 86,400 seconds in a day, and at 7mb's per second that comes to 604,800 mb's a day or 604.8 gigs a day.
Correct, if you want to discuss gigabits per day as a rate. If you want to discuss quantity, you divide by 8 since there are 8 bits in a byte
said by system001 :

limiting isp's to 1 million customers means that there would have to be more isp's created which equates to more competition, which equate to lower prices for faster service.
No it doesn't. It means that you have less economy of scale. Limiting a service provider to x number of customers does nothing to guarantee competition.

cyclone_z

join:2006-06-19
Ames, IA
reply to system001
said by system001 :

as for the math it is correct. 60 x 60 x 24 = 86,400 seconds in a day, and at 7mb's per second that comes to 604,800 mb's a day or 604.8 gigs a day.
You must work for Verizon Wireless.
»www.verizonmath.com
604.8 gigs of WHAT per day? Bits or bytes? If you started out with units in BITs (7 megaBIT connection), you end up with a value of 604.8 gigaBITs, not gigaBYTES.
If you want to convert it to bytes, you have to divide by 8 because a bit and a byte are different units!

mdrift

join:2003-08-15
Spokane, WA
Reviews:
·CenturyLink
said by cyclone_z:

said by system001 :

as for the math it is correct. 60 x 60 x 24 = 86,400 seconds in a day, and at 7mb's per second that comes to 604,800 mb's a day or 604.8 gigs a day.
You must work for Verizon Wireless.
»www.verizonmath.com
604.8 gigs of WHAT per day? Bits or bytes? If you started out with units in BITs (7 megaBIT connection), you end up with a value of 604.8 gigaBITs, not gigaBYTES.
If you want to convert it to bytes, you have to divide by 8 because a bit and a byte are different units!
Correct, but irregardless converting to bytes still shows that false notion of 1-3 GBytes of data transfer being normal. It's absurd.


system001

@qwest.net
reply to openbox9
it would be nice if you had any real idea. the cities do decide what cable/internet franchises are allowed into what part of the city. fiber optics were put in place with the original promise of more competition. as for the math once again it is correct. there is no dividing by 8. with 7mb service your monthly cap is 18,144 gigs even if we did divide by 8 your monthly cap would 2,268 gigs a month not this 250 and under a lot of isp's are talking about. granted most people will never even come near this level of use. i also stated what we need to do is limit the isp's to no more than 1 million customers nation wide, and make sure that in every market there are at least 4 choices. if you are going to quote someone make sure you do not rephrase what they said.


system001

@qwest.net
reply to cyclone_z
broadband services work with bytes not bits. there is no conversion. the isp's flat out state your service will be 4, 6, 7, 12, 20, 50 MEGABYTES PER SECOND. not once do they ever mention bits. this is the type of confusion isp's love so they can cheat you out of promised bandwidth.

cyclone_z

join:2006-06-19
Ames, IA
said by system001 :

broadband services work with bytes not bits. there is no conversion. the isp's flat out state your service will be 4, 6, 7, 12, 20, 50 MEGABYTES PER SECOND. not once do they ever mention bits. this is the type of confusion isp's love so they can cheat you out of promised bandwidth.
i don't know if you're saying they can't be converted or that ISPs are advertising speeds in bytes, but that's also not true. Megabits per second is abbreviated as Mbps. If you're talking megabytes per second, usually that's MBps, however, megabytes per second is a very uncommon measurement of transfer speed. Transfer speeds have always been measured in bits, not bytes. Go read the wikipedia article here and you will see only bits/second measured; never bytes.
»en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DSL