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viperm
Carpe Diem
Premium
join:2002-07-09
Winchester, CA

[HELP] DSL project need help with ATM switch interface?

Okay I have been handed a project by the boss.

We are able to order copper thru verizon and resell over that copper dslextreme DSL.

We are trying to do this all ourselves now. Verizon is able to provide us with a ATM switch handoff.

Here is where I get foggy. What do we need to interface with thier ATM switch. We willbe providing the modems to send to the end user configured for VCI 0 VPI 35 for verizons network. We will be the bandwidth provider from our network. I assuem the ATM handoff from them does not include any bandwidth its just for control purposes to get into thier network and ATM switch.

We will be (I am assuming here ) providing all bandwidth, Ip addresses etc. How do we set this up, what equipment will I need. We currently have a Cisco 3825 running our own network with a DS-3 on it. We will have to order more bandwidth in antisipation of tons of DSL customers.

I am looking online and I see the Cisco 1010 lightspeed chassis with what look like quad DS3 cards and a ATM CPU card?

How would I set up giving out DHCP and Static IP from our existing network thru say our new ATM connection (Cisco 1010) Can I make the cisco just a bridge with basic config and run routing and everything else thru our existing system?

Is there VCI/ VPI settings I need to configure on our end to talk to thier ATM switch etc.

I am a quick learner if pointed in the right direction I dont want to take the bosses suggestion of using our existing 3825 slapping some sort of ATM card in it creating more problems in both networks.

If possible I want to keep both networks isolated with the exception of having them tied to gether for management only.

Thanks
--
ComTrain Certified Tower Climber. American Tower Certified approved contractor. Wireless consultants.


nosx

join:2004-12-27
00000
kudos:5

1 edit

I would seriously consider hiring someone with a telco background that knows what to do with that kind of handoff. I have a lightstream1010 in my lab if you are serious about trying to use one however i would reccomend against it. The LS1010 platform is old, unsupported, and difficult to use. It runs circa IOS 11.2 code.

Depending on the bandwidth and features you need to provide service, i would probablly begin looking at a cisco 7609-S with a SIP-400 and the appropriate ATM SPA card to terminate the connection. The SPA cards come in anything from low end DS3, to OC3, OC12, and OC48, make sure to get the ATM flavor not the clearchannel or channelized. To become a service provider and do it right has the potential to be expensive. A 3845 is probablly lacking the horsepower you would need for a good deal of customers.

The topology end to end probablly looks similar to this:
DSL Customer - (modem on pvc 0/35) - (Verizon DSLAM) - (Verizon ATM switch) - (Verizon ATM switch) - (Verizon ATM switch) - (ATM handoff to YOU with a bunch of rewritten PVCs 8/123,8/124,8/125) - (your router)

You could install your own ATM switch, but im not entirely sure what you would hope to accomplish with it. If the circuit they deliver via ATM is entirely for customer connections you probablly want to take it straight into a router on your side.

You will also need a good deal of back-end server infrastructure to authenticate your DSL clients, run PPP and IPCP, assign them IP addresses, etc. The SIP400 is the middle of the road spa interface processor for OC48 and below (under 2.5gbps). For security (yes you need some kind of firewall as a provider) I would probablly use the firwall services module (FWSM) which slides right into the 7609-S chassis and will hum right along for the first 4 or 5 gbps of traffic.

I have seen customers do this kind of thing before with both ATM (for a layer2 path) and channelized DS3s (for a layer1 path) delivering circuits to their routers, and then providing internet access to their customer circuits.
Most of the time, they end up co-locating their router in a large datacenter for access to cheap bandwidth and cheap(er) circuit delivery. That way you can take your GIGE straight out of the router and into an internet exchange.

Becoming a provider is alot more intensive than just plugging in, you need an AS number, address space, and the hardware, tools, process, and people to make it all run.



viperm
Carpe Diem
Premium
join:2002-07-09
Winchester, CA
reply to viperm

Thanks Deep! that helps a lot we have our own AS as we run our own extensive wireless network already.

I was just looking at what we needed to get the ball rolling on the DSL thing. The boss made it a hot subjet and wants to roll right away. You and I both know that the bosses tend to think Oh yea plug tis in here use this thingy there and bang piece of cake!

Well we all know there is a LOT more involved and me being one person runnign the whole show and managing our existing network its kind of hard to manage it all. I am going to suggest we hire on another person to help me out I just cant do this all alone

Someone on the other forum said they are using a VXR unit with enchanced DS-3 card and NPE-300.

What do you think?
--
ComTrain Certified Tower Climber. American Tower Certified approved contractor. Wireless consultants.


nosx

join:2004-12-27
00000
kudos:5

1 edit

You will need an actual ATM interface on the router, so check and make sure the part number is what you need. If you want to go cheap you can use a 7200VXR but i would absolutely not skimp on resources or NPE. I have a customer right now in St Louis using PA-A3-OC3-SMI in a 7206VXR to terminate their maybe 90 or so point to point, and point to multipoint ATM PVCs. Its being delievered as a single-mode ATM OC3 from SBC. You will consume alot of hardware resources keeping all of those PPP sessions active and depending the way you go about configuring it, virtual-access interfaces cloned from virtual-templates. I have not seen a DSL implementation using DHCP, i have only seen the PPP method.



viperm
Carpe Diem
Premium
join:2002-07-09
Winchester, CA
reply to viperm

Yea I figured as much as maxing out ram and processor as those are pretty cheap especially ram!

I will most likely go PPPOE since we use it anyways on our Wireless network without any real issues.
--
ComTrain Certified Tower Climber. American Tower Certified approved contractor. Wireless consultants.