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fartness
computersoc dot com
Premium
join:2003-03-25
Look Outside

Rehirable at a job?

One of my former employers from six years ago is telling jobs I apply to that I am not rehirable.

When I worked there, I gave a month's notice that I was quitting because I was going to school, and then I finished up my last days. One of my bosses didn't like me then and she is the one who said I am not rehirable. I quit and was not fired, so aren't they supposed to answer "yes"?

When I put the former employer information on a job I am applying to, what are they allowed to ask? Just if I am hirable/rehirable?

What should I do?



McSummation
Mmmm, Zeebas Are Tastee.
Premium,MVM
join:2003-08-13
Fort Worth, TX
kudos:2

They're allowed to ask just about anything. Your former employer is allowed to say just about anything that is "true".

The company I worked for for 30 years only answered, "Yes, they worked here" when asked about a former employee, even one that was fired for stealing.



Sopper
Premium
join:2000-11-02
Rochester, MN
reply to fartness

said by fartness:

One of my former employers from six years ago is telling jobs I apply to that I am not rehirable.

When I worked there, I gave a month's notice that I was quitting because I was going to school, and then I finished up my last days. One of my bosses didn't like me then and she is the one who said I am not rehirable. I quit and was not fired, so aren't they supposed to answer "yes"?

When I put the former employer information on a job I am applying to, what are they allowed to ask? Just if I am hirable/rehirable?

What should I do?
Apparently you did something there that you're not disclosing to us. Perhaps you should take this as a learning experience and not repeat the mistakes of the past.


fartness
computersoc dot com
Premium
join:2003-03-25
Look Outside

I told on my boss to their boss because of something they were doing wrong. She hated me ever since.


Anon00
Premium
join:2001-09-25
USA
kudos:1
reply to fartness

Are they saying they wouldn't hire you again or that you're a moron?

I mean it would depend on what your former employer is saying... I know some of the companies/bigger corps I've worked for tell their management to direct any inquiries into HR and HR will only confirm employment dates... even if they would say something flattering. My current boss had to do that to a former employee, since that's our companies policy, though he kind of pushed the point that he would re-hire this person, since he was a good, knowledgeable employee.

I've known people who have had spiteful employers, so that would suck if they're trying to "Black ball" you.
--
"Ah, women. They make the highs higher and the lows more frequent." - Friedrich Nietzsche
"'It's the law' is just an excuse for the unintelligent and unimaginative to remain that way" - Me



Mr Neutron
Ceaseless, Tasteless, and Gormless
Premium
join:2005-05-30
Gorham, ME
reply to McSummation

said by McSummation:

The company I worked for for 30 years only answered, "Yes, they worked here" when asked about a former employee, even one that was fired for stealing.
Sounds like you worked for a smart company.

Giving anything beyond dates of employment is not a good idea, regardless of whether it's a positive or negative opinion. Telling an ex-employee's prospective employers that, say, s/he attained the nickname "Forrest Gump" when they worked for you is not a good idea, as I was always led to understand that doing so creates a liability for the former employer. Same deal with a positive review: you're helping to create an impression you could be held liable for later on.

I suppose that telling prospective employers you're not rehireable may not be actionable, (i.e. it's a fact rather than strictly an opinion) but that doesn't mean your former employer isn't in the running for the Forrest Gump Award themselves by opening their mouth and allowing anything other than "Yes, Joe Blow worked here from date X to date Y. Bye!" to come out.
--
We could use the £5,000 to buy a spoon. And then fill up with ice cream.


Mr Neutron
Ceaseless, Tasteless, and Gormless
Premium
join:2005-05-30
Gorham, ME
reply to Anon00

said by Anon00:

Are they saying they wouldn't hire you again or that you're a moron?
Wow: there's just no beating about the bush with some people.
--
We could use the £5,000 to buy a spoon. And then fill up with ice cream.

Anon00
Premium
join:2001-09-25
USA
kudos:1

said by Mr Neutron:

said by Anon00:

Are they saying they wouldn't hire you again or that you're a moron?
Wow: there's just no beating about the bush with some people.
Lol, sorry just wanted to illustrate the difference between a non-slanderous and slanderous statement

No offense meant to the OP. What he said, about going over a boss' head, even when he was in the right, would definitely piss a boss off. Most people don't like to be told they're wrong.. even if they are I could see the former boss trying to get back at him.

Good luck. Maybe have someone pose as a potential employer and see what they're saying... Record it if it's legal.
--
"Ah, women. They make the highs higher and the lows more frequent." - Friedrich Nietzsche
"'It's the law' is just an excuse for the unintelligent and unimaginative to remain that way" - Me


beerbum
Premium
join:2000-05-06
Reading, PA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to McSummation

said by McSummation:

They're allowed to ask just about anything. Your former employer is allowed to say just about anything that is "true".

The company I worked for for 30 years only answered, "Yes, they worked here" when asked about a former employee, even one that was fired for stealing.
Not in my state. Here in Pennsylvania, the only information a former employer is allowed to give out is "Yes/No he/she worked here." Anything more is against the law and the PA DL&I will come down hard on the company (provided you complain - and they do check by calling and posing as a potential employer).


rexbinary
Mod King
Premium
join:2005-01-26
Plano, TX

2 recommendations

reply to fartness

Stop using them for a reference.


PrntRhd
Premium
join:2004-11-03
Fairfield, CA
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to fartness

I agree with that.

Some employers refuse to rehire persons who quit, ie a local Olive Garden restaurant, I don't have a problem with that no matter how stupid the policy is. Telling others the employee is not rehirable is not a smart thing to do however.
These days I refer all inquiries about "terminated" employees to our HR Department and make no other comments.



beck
Premium,MVM
join:2002-01-29
On The Road
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Stablehost.com
reply to fartness

Is HR saying you are not rehirable or are they talking to the old boss? If they are talking to the old boss, then don't put the name of the boss in the resume or application.

I've had bosses that liked me or hated me. The feeling was mutual. So find one of your old bosses that liked you for a reference.
--
Some people are like slinkies - not really good for much.
But they bring a smile to your face when pushed down the stairs.



DavisPhotog
Flyingphotog
Premium,MVM
join:2001-08-26
Santa Rosa, CA
reply to fartness

If you want to pay for it:
»www.badreferences.com/

I've got a former employer who is bitter as hell that I left and I'm afraid to use him as a reference just yet. I may be using a service like this before I use him as a real reference.
--
I am the Flying Photog, see my website accordingly named Flyingphotog.com. User known formerly as zakooldude.



Vampirefo
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-11
Huntington, WV
kudos:1
reply to fartness

said by fartness:

One of my former employers from six years ago is telling jobs I apply to that I am not rehirable.

When I worked there, I gave a month's notice that I was quitting because I was going to school, and then I finished up my last days. One of my bosses didn't like me then and she is the one who said I am not rehirable. I quit and was not fired, so aren't they supposed to answer "yes"?

When I put the former employer information on a job I am applying to, what are they allowed to ask? Just if I am hirable/rehirable?

What should I do?
In today's market your former employer is stupid, it wont be long until they are sued, No employer that I know, would bad mouth anyone, they would simply state the time frame you worked for them.

They would not release any information on your leaving.
--
Best RegardsVampirefo

Bobcat79
Premium
join:2001-02-04
reply to DavisPhotog

said by DavisPhotog:

If you want to pay for it:
»www.badreferences.com/
Cool. I'd use that if a former employer was bad-mouthing me.
--
It's nice to be important, but it's more important to be nice.


45071419

join:2006-07-30
reply to DavisPhotog

The OP is not using the company as a reference, just providing the work history as usual that all employers ask for.

Is he supposed to lie about who employed him during this time or leave an employment gap on his resume?



DavisPhotog
Flyingphotog
Premium,MVM
join:2001-08-26
Santa Rosa, CA

No, but most places don't *require* that you give contact information for your prior employers. Some even ask you "may we contact this person?"


lefty1

join:2002-10-25
Clay, NY

1 edit
reply to Anon00

"Most people don't like to be told they're wrong.. even if they are"

Especially if they are.

I had a somewhat similar situation years ago. A customer accused me of stealing some money, which was totally untrue. I'm not trying to defend myself here, but you would think that after 10 years of employment the company would have known how good my character is. They took the low road and fired me with no investigation (officially I was 'let go' for other reasons) and then bad-mouthed me to other prospective employers for years. I couldn't get jobs I knew I was qualified for while the companies hired many less-qualified candidates.

If I could prove what I'm sure they did, I'd sue them.



Mr Neutron
Ceaseless, Tasteless, and Gormless
Premium
join:2005-05-30
Gorham, ME

1 recommendation

reply to DavisPhotog

said by DavisPhotog:

No, but most places don't *require* that you give contact information for your prior employers. Some even ask you "may we contact this person?"
One way to handle references is to put this at the end of your résumé:

"References available upon request."

In the case of you former "pal," this would give you a chance to leave them out. Granted, some employers may seek to contact them anyway (I don't know how many jobs you've held in the six years since then). However, furnishing references that way would give you an opportunity to provide a prospective employer a reference or three that won't badmouth you like your old buddy Mrs. Gump will.
--
We could use the £5,000 to buy a spoon. And then fill up with ice cream.

tcope
Premium
join:2003-05-07
Sandy, UT
kudos:2
reply to fartness

If this former company has an HR dept/person, call that person and let them know what your former boss is doing. Remind the HR person that you may find the need to hold them accountable for the information they are giving out.

When you list your former employer info, see about giving a phone number/address to the home office or to the HP dept/person. Try to keep people from calling your boss directly.



DannyZ
Gentoo Fanboy
Premium
join:2003-01-29
Erie, PA
reply to beerbum

said by beerbum:

said by McSummation:

They're allowed to ask just about anything. Your former employer is allowed to say just about anything that is "true".

The company I worked for for 30 years only answered, "Yes, they worked here" when asked about a former employee, even one that was fired for stealing.
Not in my state. Here in Pennsylvania, the only information a former employer is allowed to give out is "Yes/No he/she worked here." Anything more is against the law and the PA DL&I will come down hard on the company (provided you complain - and they do check by calling and posing as a potential employer).
Wrong. There is no such law. Many Pennsylvanians seem to think so, yet not a single one has been able to find and cite the actual law.
--
Out the 10BaseT, through the modem, down the co-ax, over the fiber, across the backhaul, past the edge router, off the network...nothing but net

sancraig

join:2003-11-05
Saint Louis, MO
reply to fartness

It's the magic question employers ask. Future employer asks ex employer would they hire you back. Fair question and as long as the ex employer answers truthfully there is nothing you can sue em for.



TigerLord
UEE Citizen
Premium,Mod
join:2002-06-09
Canada
kudos:8
reply to fartness

I suppose the law differs in the US or every states. The law here forbids any disclosure of any information whatsoever. You can only confirm he was indeed employed there from X to Y.


AricBrown

join:2002-12-11
Amarillo, TX
Reviews:
·Suddenlink
reply to fartness

Where I work company policy just says yes/no they worked here and from what date to what date. Now if they put me down as a personal reference outside the company (ie my home number) I will tell all the wonderful things about them (bad employees dont put me down personally.) Actually now I can't even say they worked here its just "Please hold for HR" and then I transfer them.



JRW2
R.I.P. Mom, Brian, Ziggy, Max and Zen.
Premium
join:2004-12-20
La La Land
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Optimum Online
reply to beerbum

said by beerbum:

said by McSummation:

They're allowed to ask just about anything. Your former employer is allowed to say just about anything that is "true".

The company I worked for for 30 years only answered, "Yes, they worked here" when asked about a former employee, even one that was fired for stealing.
Not in my state. Here in Pennsylvania, the only information a former employer is allowed to give out is "Yes/No he/she worked here." Anything more is against the law and the PA DL&I will come down hard on the company (provided you complain - and they do check by calling and posing as a potential employer).
I believe this may be true in MOST places, and if the former employer is in fact "bad mouthing" him, he may have a case against them.

Talk to a lawyer, you may have a great case.
--
RIAA/MPAA... Bite me!!!!
In constant search for intelligent life on Earth!


DannyZ
Gentoo Fanboy
Premium
join:2003-01-29
Erie, PA

Many claim this to be true, yet no one seems to be able to support this belief with facts. I've searched myself and have never been able to find any laws or any court cases against an employer who discloses negative factual information.

I am really sceptical any such laws do exist in any state in the nation.
--
Out the 10BaseT, through the modem, down the co-ax, over the fiber, across the backhaul, past the edge router, off the network...nothing but net


PrntRhd
Premium
join:2004-11-03
Fairfield, CA
Reviews:
·Comcast

3 edits

said by DannyZ:

Many claim this to be true, yet no one seems to be able to support this belief with facts. I've searched myself and have never been able to find any laws or any court cases against an employer who discloses negative factual information.

I am really sceptical any such laws do exist in any state in the nation.
It does not need to be a CRIME, but if you get caught trying to deny someone employment somewhere else it easily becomes a CIVIL TORTS case, meaning you can/will get sued for lots of cash. You are not allowed to slander or defame someone just because they are no longer in your employ, and you cannot keep them from getting another job down the road. This is why companies advise their employees to not say anything that could be used in such a suit against their company.
It may also be against fair labor code, and state and federal sanctions may also cost the company even more in fines for such offensive behavior. Only a judge HR specialist or a lawyer specializing in labor law would know the liabilities involved.


Bink63
Namedrop THIS
Premium
join:2002-10-06
Everywhere

Hmmm...

I wonder what the Mickey D's in Cordelia would say about me now???

Armijo! Armijo!



KrK
Heavy Artillery For The Little Guy
Premium
join:2000-01-17
Tulsa, OK
reply to fartness

That is grounds for a lawsuit, which you will win.

If you have told us the whole story, and you can prove it, you could sue them and it would be a win.
--
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the merger of state and corporate power." -- Benito Mussolini



pp03

join:2002-06-13
reply to lefty1

The couple jobs I've eventually quit, fast food and walmart ended in the same way. Thanks for your time, we are marking you as rehirable. I've always assumed that is all they'd say when potential employers called them.

said by lefty1:

"Most people don't like to be told they're wrong.. even if they are"

Especially if they are.

I had a somewhat similar situation years ago. A customer accused me of stealing some money, which was totally untrue. I'm not trying to defend myself here, but you would think that after 10 years of employment the company would have known how good my character is. They took the low road and fired me with no investigation (officially I was 'let go' for other reasons) and then bad-mouthed me to other prospective employers for years. I couldn't get jobs I knew I was qualified for while the companies hired many less-qualified candidates.

If I could prove what I'm sure they did, I'd sue them.
I'm not trying to be a prick, but a lot of companies can't wait for seemingly legit reasons to fire people they just don't like. You can't really fire someone for having a crappy attitude, but you sure can fire a thief with a crappy attitude
--
The History Channel rocks! ... you know it!