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Victor43

@rogers.com

Wireless G vs Wireless N

Can anyone tell me if its worthwhile to upgrade a G router to a N router ? Are they that much faster or with better wireless security (i.e WPA2) ?

Thanks in advance

Victor



No_Strings
Premium,MVM,Ex-Mod 2008-13
join:2001-11-22
The OC
kudos:6

»Should I buy an "N" router?


stevech0

join:2006-09-17
San Diego, CA

1 edit
reply to Victor43

said by Victor43 :

Can anyone tell me if its worthwhile to upgrade a G router to a N router ? Are they that much faster or with better wireless security (i.e WPA2) ?

Thanks in advance

Victor
Opinion: most users get no benefit from 11n.

Would you really pay for better security if what you have is good enough? More likely a burglar will steal your TV/computers?

Bell_Dom

join:2009-02-04
Gatineau, QC
kudos:16

Not sure about security, but i enjoy the faster speeds i get with my N wireless connection.



dellsweig
Extreme Aerobatics
Premium,MVM
join:2003-12-10
Campbell Hall, NY
kudos:1
reply to Victor43

said by Victor43 :

Can anyone tell me if its worthwhile to upgrade a G router to a N router ? Are they that much faster or with better wireless security (i.e WPA2) ?

Thanks in advance

Victor
My 2 cents:

For 99% of home users, the main difference will be in the delivery of content.

Audio files have no problem with G speeds. Video and to some extent photos benifit greatly from N speeds.

For example, my wife browses our photo libraries (located on an N connected share from her laptop using Vista Windows Photo Gallery. This tool wants to load large thumbnails of the hundreds of photos from the share. When the laptop uses the G wireless - this can take a minute or two to come up and populate the images. With the N connection it is seconds.

The same would be for video stored on our media share.

Unless you have a specific need for N speeds like a wirelessly connected media server, G will be fine for most home users

stevech0

join:2006-09-17
San Diego, CA

2 edits

re the above... for Internet access, of course most consumers' Internet service is slower than 11g.

For PC to PC within your home, 11n can be faster than 11g, IF, IF, you are able to operate in 40MHz bandwidth (channel pairs) mode of 11n, and this is quite problematic as it uses 2/3 of the WiFi band. By principle, 11n routers are supposed to decline to use 40MHz if there are other 11b/g WiFi systems within that 40MHz. You can override this courtesy, at the expense of your neighbors' WiFi performance.

And of course, all your PCs have to be 11n and 40MHz capable.

The 20MHz (normal) mode of 11n is insignificantly faster, or the same, as 11g.



dellsweig
Extreme Aerobatics
Premium,MVM
join:2003-12-10
Campbell Hall, NY
kudos:1

said by stevech0:

re the above... for Internet access, of course most consumers' Internet service is slower than 11g.

For PC to PC within your home, 11n can be faster than 11g, IF, IF, you are able to operate in 40MHz bandwidth (channel pairs) mode of 11n, and this is quite problematic as it uses 2/3 of the WiFi band. By principle, 11n routers are supposed to decline to use 40MHz if there are other 11b/g WiFi systems within that 40MHz. You can override this courtesy, at the expense of your neighbors' WiFi performance.

And of course, all your PCs have to be 11n and 40MHz capable.

The 20MHz (normal) mode of 11n is insignificantly faster, or the same, as 11g.
I beg to differ with this

The 20Mhz single channel N mode give 130Mbps where 11G gives max 54Mbps.. The 40Mhz, bonded channel mode goves a max of 270Mbps

In most real world environments G max's out between 14 and 18 Mbps - my ISP gives me 30Mbps which is far less than G affords me.

That is a significant difference


PeteC2
Got Mouse?
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join:2002-01-20
Bristol, CT
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Reviews:
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said by dellsweig:

said by stevech0:

re the above... for Internet access, of course most consumers' Internet service is slower than 11g.

For PC to PC within your home, 11n can be faster than 11g, IF, IF, you are able to operate in 40MHz bandwidth (channel pairs) mode of 11n, and this is quite problematic as it uses 2/3 of the WiFi band. By principle, 11n routers are supposed to decline to use 40MHz if there are other 11b/g WiFi systems within that 40MHz. You can override this courtesy, at the expense of your neighbors' WiFi performance.

And of course, all your PCs have to be 11n and 40MHz capable.

The 20MHz (normal) mode of 11n is insignificantly faster, or the same, as 11g.
I beg to differ with this

The 20Mhz single channel N mode give 130Mbps where 11G gives max 54Mbps.. The 40Mhz, bonded channel mode goves a max of 270Mbps

In most real world environments G max's out between 14 and 18 Mbps - my ISP gives me 30Mbps which is far less than G affords me.

That is a significant difference
Agreed. 11n is slowly but steadily becoming more relevant.

I am in the middle of a number of close-by 11g and 11n networks, and have no issues with the 40mhz band, neither me, nor my neighbors. I have no problems running both bands on my dual band router, using the 20mhz band for my 11g/b devices, and the 40mhz band for my 11n notebooks.

I do not have a blazing connection, 6Mbps DSL, so there is no advantage there, however, for file transfers between computers and my NAS, there is a big difference.

For many folks, 11n may offer no immediate advantages, but that does not hold true for everyone, and increasingly, more people will benefit from 11n.
--
Deeds, not words

stevech0

join:2006-09-17
San Diego, CA

1 edit

You are right. I misspoke.

11n can get to QAM64 and thus higher than 11g's 54Mbps. But the signal to noise ratio needed for this is such that the range is short enough, or so few walls can be in the path, that it, to me, is not common.

Of course, these bit rates are merely the 802.11 burst rates. The net yield at the IP layer is more like 60% of the burst rate.

Most 11g systems, at 54Mbps, can yield 24-26Mbps net, and there are few IP service providers offering that rate, and moreover, how many Internet hosts will provide that per client connection?

So these higher WiFi speeds are useful for huge file transfers between PCs within your own LAN. Or streaming HD. I stream standard def. TV (MPEG2, 6Mbps) just fine with 11g and have for years.

So 11n, esp. when the Standard is ratified, and we have lower prices and true interoperability, begins to make sense, in terms of cost-benefit. Today, IMO, it's a novelty for the geeks among us.