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jvanbrecht

join:2007-01-08
Bowie, MD
reply to KenC

Re: Well, the only alternative...

I doubt Apple will cripple their phone for anyone (ATT MMS And tethering aside) from a functional standpoint of the device itself. From carrier services, they can be customized for each individual carrier. But then again, Verizon does not need to force Apple to cripple the iphone, they have done a fine job of that on their own, bluetooth is a joke for anything other then audio and tethering (yes I have the tether hack enabled), the appstore, well thats also a joke, unless you like a millions of useless apps.

But back to the point, Apple does its own thing, there is no way they would cripple the ability to say copy photos from the device via USB (which verizon did with a number of its phones in the past) and force users to use Verizons photo service. Same goes for ringtones, apple has its own crap policy on those (although with garage band, you can create your own ringtones legitimately)...

So.. when you think about it, from a screwing customers over, Apple really is no different then Verizon when it comes to screwing with functionality.


NOVA_Guy
ObamaCare Kills Americans
Premium
join:2002-03-05
I could very easily Verizon (or AT&T, for that matter) insisting that future revisions of the iPhone OS specifically include code banning certain applications from running (or something of a similar nature). I'm specifically thinking about apps that do mobile video streaming (like Slingbox, Orb, etc.) and perhaps even audio streaming (like Pandora, last.fm, and Slacker).

I could also see Verizon or AT&T trying to figure out ways for their network to determine when someone has jailbroken an iPhone, so they could potentially disable it (or at least disable its data connection). While iPhone hacking may not be illegal, wireless carriers could modify their TOS to not permit "hacked" phones of any nature on their networks. (This would also potentially prohibit people from unlocking phones purchased elsewhere and bringing them to a network.)

Doing the above accomplishes a lot of things in one fell swoop: it requires users to be locked into contracts by buying phones phones from a provider to get service; it prevents smartphone users from doing anything the networks don't "authorize" with their phones; and it dramatically decreases data usage capabilities for smartphone users (bringing network operating costs down).
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Trusting the Democrats to fix our economy and give us health care is like trusting the fox with keys to the henhouse, a brand new gas stove, and a pantry full of goodies for side dishes. In the end, all will be dead and nothing but lies will be told.