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Matt3
All noise, no signal.
Premium
join:2003-07-20
Jamestown, NC
kudos:12

1 recommendation

reply to cornelius785

Re: Its about time!!!

The draft stuff was approved by the IEEE and still doesn't work well. This article mentions that the FINAL 802.11n spec was released, but the Draft 1.0 and Draft 2.0 gear was sanctioned by the IEEE and based upon standards.


Samsonian

join:2007-06-15

said by Matt3:

The draft stuff was approved by the IEEE and still doesn't work well. This article mentions that the FINAL 802.11n spec was released, but the Draft 1.0 and Draft 2.0 gear was sanctioned by the IEEE and based upon standards.
That's not true.

The IEEE working groups draft and approve the standards, 802.11n in this case. The IEEE doesn't approve or certify any equipment to said standards. Usually a non-profit industry consortia is formed for that specific purpose, if it's needed. In the case of Wi-Fi, the Wi-Fi Alliance is responsible for device testing and certification.

I don't think it's fair to blame the IEEE for companies creating equipment based on draft standards, id est incomplete and a work in progress.

If you want to blame someone for bad devices, blame the device companies for making them and the Wi-Fi Alliance for approving them.

Also, concerning standardization and standard bodies: yes, it takes long time to create standards. It's common complaint. That's generally the price to be paid to get standards though, because standards require consensus, typically over 70% approval required (let's see any legislature get that).

Look at the upside of standards: customer confidence in implementations, a bigger market, increased competition, more products, and lower prices. A win all around.

Standards wars do the exact opposite. There are few, if any, winners.


Matt3
All noise, no signal.
Premium
join:2003-07-20
Jamestown, NC
kudos:12

So the gear itself is certified by the WiFi Alliance, but engineered to the IEEE specs. That makes sense. Either way, the gear and the process to get to the final standard is terribly broken. I have little faith that the final 802.11n standard will do anything to improve the problems with 802.11n gear -- unless they require it to operate in the 5GHz range.