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urbanriot
Premium
join:2004-10-18
Canada
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Cogeco Cable
reply to OZO

Re: [WIN7] What do you absolutely hate about beloved Windows 7?

said by OZO:

It's not a matter of adopting a new view or some confusion with the new design - it's more and more mouse clicks, clicks
I'm with you there man, it's like the people that made Windows Vista / Windows 7 / Windows Server 2008 never used a previous or alternative operating system, and decided to make the UI less efficient. I hate the amount of clicks necessary to complete tasks like setting up wireless networks, that were so much simpler in previous Windows like XP.

kaisa's right though, you can somewhat optimize the explorer view in options... not as well as you should be able to and might like, as it's really limited, but there's a few options in there.

OZO
Premium
join:2003-01-17
kudos:2

1 edit

said by urbanriot:

said by OZO:

It's not a matter of adopting a new view or some confusion with the new design - it's more and more mouse clicks, clicks
I'm with you there man, it's like the people that made Windows Vista / Windows 7 / Windows Server 2008 never used a previous or alternative operating system, and decided to make the UI less efficient. I hate the amount of clicks necessary to complete tasks like setting up wireless networks, that were so much simpler in previous Windows like XP.
I guess I know what's going on here.

It was a very exciting period in Windows development when they tried to do things as best as they can. Primary software in most cases was well designed, worked as it should from many perspectives. This period was ended with WXP. Beginning with Vista they start offering not the best product, but rather features. They start to balance feature set by adding some and pulling out others. Remove features now and you'll be able to sell them again later. It's pure and simple marketing.

Do you need an example of reduced functionality? You know the difference between old style menu and new menu offered in many parts of OS now - it's the number of mouse clicks. In WXP if you want to launch a program - you make one click to open "Start" menu. Then you put mouse cursor over "All Programs" and soon the first level of menu appears automatically. You put cursor over a folder inside and a new sub-menu is up again, no any mouse clicks required. You may go through multiple branches of deep nested sub-menu sets and you'll never need to click mouse until you got to the program you want to start. As you see, to start a program it requires just two mouse clicks in total (in case if you press "Win" button to open "Start" menu - it's even less, only one mouse click is needed). Now, what we've got in the new start menu in W7? You have to click on "Start" button, then you have to click on folder to open sub-menu, then you have to click on folder inside to open a nested new sub-menu, etc. Click, click, click... The more you have organized your start menu (as I do all the time), the more clicks you have to make. And it's all done in confined space of a small window (without an ability even to change its size). That's what "reduced" (or "managed") functionality means to end user. It's done exactly the same way as it's done in IE7, where, by default, they hid "Favorites" menu (along other items in old menu bar) and offered you "Favorites Center" instead, where you have to click, click, and click... again and again. There is no doubt that old menu, that doesn't require multiple mouse clicks, is better then the new click-oriented menu (and I'm sure that product managers know that very well). But, you've got what you've paid for... (elementary marketing in for-profit products)

So, I don't think that anybody could believe that "it's like the people that made Windows Vista / Windows 7 / Windows Server 2008 never used a previous or alternative operating system, and decided to make the UI less efficient. " They surely know what they're doing.
--
Keep it simple, it'll become complex by itself...


kaisa
Premium
join:2002-08-20
Chicago, IL

I can think of maybe 10 or so programs I use frequently enough to warrant the fastest possible access time. I generally stick 3-4 of the most used on the taskbar. The rest get pinned to the start menu, where i can access them...well...quickly. Anything else that gets used i can find and launch faster than navigating a crummy start menu folder tree (see windows xp) by using the search and launching my program from there.

Despite it kinda being a resource hog if you have a crappy computer, the indexing service makes it easy to launch programs directly from search. I use it all the time. Give it a try....maybe you'll be more efficient?


OZO
Premium
join:2003-01-17
kudos:2

Start programs directly from search? Are you kidding?

My programs are all well organized and have shortcuts in different places (left sidebar is used to launch all most frequently used programs, two toolbars "Main" and "Links" are accessible form taskbar in the bottom and programs in old "Start | All Programs" menu). And, BTW, there is almost no shortcuts on Desktop (except ones that are waiting for drag-n-drop launch). Each menu root has its own purpose - quick access (from the left sidebar menu), majority of the programs / utilities that I can run without any installation (actual programs are not on C: drive, thus I may easy reinstall Windows OS and all of them will still be started from that "Main" menu immediately after that) are organized in "Main" menu, "Links" contains shortcuts to a lot of personal documents in HTML format that I can be accessed immediately and be edited or just viewed in IE. As you can see - in most cases there is no any need to do any search, I do not have to waste my time to make those searches every time I need to work with my documents or programs.
--
Keep it simple, it'll become complex by itself...



kaisa
Premium
join:2002-08-20
Chicago, IL

2 edits

I suppose search carries a bad connotation that has left windows users thinking that it has to be slow and useless.

I think if it more as the windows equivalent of locate. Indexes are nice and certainly speed up the process. I view it more as window's bastardized version of Apple's spotlight.



Matt3
All noise, no signal.
Premium
join:2003-07-20
Jamestown, NC
kudos:12
reply to urbanriot

said by urbanriot:

I hate the amount of clicks necessary to complete tasks like setting up wireless networks, that were so much simpler in previous Windows like XP.
I don't think Windows 7 requires any more mouse clicks than XP to configure a wireless network. I just connected to a brand new one with 3 clicks. The network icon in the system tray has been vastly improved over Vista PITA icon, minus the removal of the activity animation.