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openbox9
Premium
join:2004-01-26
Germany
kudos:2
reply to vp71inet

Re: A little dial-up history

said by vp71inet:

The primary reason would likely be for lack of competition as we largely have today. Who are you to tell that this won't force creative minds to develop new algorithms/protocols, whatever, that would circumvent or render these barrier restrictions moot?
You mean like alternative ISPs building out their own infrastructure to induce competition (which I favor)? Or perhaps the government stepping on the incumbents and forcing wholesale line sharing (which I don't favor)? Or perhaps the government builds out a common infrastructure similar to the roadway system, and then leases the authority to utilize the infrastructure to whomever would like to provide service (I stand in the middle on this and would need to see the business case before leaning either way)?


worldchanged

@140.108.1.x
reply to funchords
"Funny, they weren't saying anything when many users were paying tolls!" Do you really not understand that networks are engineered based on educated assumptions about how much each user will be online making demands on the network. The more consumers online and the longer they stay online, the more capacity that has to be built by the supplier and the more cost recovery required to pay for that capacity. When AOL users were paying toll rates, they were paying for the extra use (albeit for toll versus capacity) and they were discouraged from using more than they needed. When all AOL calls became flat rate local, no more extra money to pay for the extra capacity being consumed. Naturally suppliers began to look for a way to re-engineer and pay for extra capacity.


tschmidt
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-12
Milford, NH
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said by worldchanged :

Do you really not understand that networks are engineered based on educated assumptions about how much each user will be online making demands on the network.
I'll go out on a limb and state that funchords See Profile probably understands the economic decisions that were used.

Now that people and companies have discovered innovative ways to use the Internet, inconsistent with the model used by early ISPs, what is the proper public policy?

1) Give ISPs power to prevent or limit these new uses in order to protect their business assumptions.

-- OR --

2) Create regulations that encourage creative use of the Internet. If that drives up cost ISPs will either have to figure out ways to reduce cost or pass it on to customers.

Backbone speed is pretty cheap. Note I did not say free just pretty cheap. Most of the cost of first-mile access is wiring and customer support. That cost is fairly immune to changes in usage.

Grumbling by ISPs about excessive use has less to do with heavy customer use then concern high speed connectivity will undercut legacy business for the Cable companies. That is why you see cable industry being much more aggressive in this fight then Telcos.

/tom

fixed typos