dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
11
share rss forum feed
HD is still compressed a LOT »
This is a sub-selection from Keeping pace


fifty nine

join:2002-09-25
Sussex, NJ
kudos:2
reply to Gbcue

Re: Keeping pace

said by Gbcue:

said by tschmidt:

said by Luminaris:

So what's the point of other countries having 2-3X the speed we have then? Is it a need? That's what I wonder.
Residential speed is a chicken N egg problem.

Application and service providers are not going to develop applications that need very high speed until there is a large enough population of users to justify it. If we were all still constrained to dialup most of the applications and services we take for granted today would not be practical.

Video libraries and video on demand is very demanding. HD feed requires about 15 Mbps. For a family of four the sweet spot is 100 Mbps. 3-D when it happens will need even more bandwidth.

Telecommuting is popular but often limited by how quickly data flows between employee and office.

New immersive games and virtual reality all require high capacity fast connections.

Ultimately the upper bound is driven by human physiology and compression algorithms.

/tom
Is it really a Chicken/Egg problem?

Remember when everybody was going from dial-up to broadband? Was it done for fun? No, it was done because application providers were already thinking of the future.

The same needs to be done for broadband speed. When people get fed up of waiting for an HD stream to load over their 10Mbit connection, they'll soon jump, like how we all did to broadband.
The first people I knew who got broadband (that neat new service from the phone company called a "digital subscriber line") got it to run FTP sites to trade pirated music files.

I honestly didn't begin to see applications that needed broadband until after 2002 or so. Maybe there were, but I didn't see them.

100Mbps isn't really needed for HD streaming video right now. In fact you can do that on a 10M connection with MPEG4 compression.


scoopy03

join:2003-05-06
00000

said by fifty nine:

100Mbps isn't really needed for HD streaming video right now. In fact you can do that on a 10M connection with MPEG4 compression.
one hd tv stream will use all that up in one connection. and say your dad wants his news from a "newsgroup" and mom wants to watch her missed episode of her soap opera and the son wants to download the newest mmorpg or demos. the daughter may want to upload her hundreds of pictures to facebook/myspace or something like that. how frustrated with that family be with a 10M connection.


tschmidt
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-12
Milford, NH
kudos:9
Reviews:
·G4 Communications
·Fairpoint Commun..
·Hollis Hosting

1 edit

1 recommendation

reply to fifty nine

said by fifty nine:

100Mbps isn't really needed for HD streaming video right now. In fact you can do that on a 10M connection with MPEG4 compression.
Broadcast quality HDTV is about 15 Mbps - was set that way to fit into the 19 Mbps available. More advanced compression algorithms reduce requirement a little more. But bottom line, high resolution full motion video takes a lot of bandwidth.

Assuming a typical family of four connection needs 60 Mbps in order to deliver individual HD streams, exclusive of everything else to each family member.

That is why 100 Mbps is the sweet spot for residential broadband. Also happens to be a standard Ethernet speed.

/tom