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aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..

Is there anything that dissolves silicone?

In some not exactly sane moment, I used silicone caulk to fill some voids. Now I'm trying to get rid of it because the whole thing need to be painted, but completely removing the dried caulk is a royal *PITA*.
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TheMG
Premium
join:2007-09-04
Canada
kudos:3

1 edit
Yes there is, and it's called silicone solvent, possibly sold under an array of different brand names.


AnonEMouse

@rr.com
reply to aurgathor
As far as I know there are no chemicals/solvents that can be bought by anyone to actually dissolve cured silicone from what I've been told, but if I'm wrong someone please do point them out, the only ones I've found for uncured silicone (aka silicone solvent as TheMG said)

I found that denatured alcohol worked ok for softening cured silicone up, and then using a wire brush or a razor to scrape it off, and then using a rag wet with denatured alcohol to rub lose the film left over.

...I found this out after I caulked my bathroom, only to find out 1 of the "new" tubes I purchased that day was expired by over a year, the caulking did not cure properly and I had to remove it.


nunya
LXI 483
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:12
reply to aurgathor
What type of surface are you removing the caulk from?

public

join:2002-01-19
Santa Clara, CA
reply to AnonEMouse
said by AnonEMouse :

As far as I know there are no chemicals/solvents that can be bought by anyone to actually dissolve cured silicone from what I've been told,
»www.omega.com/pdf/tubing/technic···rt_5.asp


aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..
reply to nunya
said by nunya:

What type of surface are you removing the caulk from?
Wood
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aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..
reply to public
said by public:

said by AnonEMouse :

As far as I know there are no chemicals/solvents that can be bought by anyone to actually dissolve cured silicone from what I've been told,
»www.omega.com/pdf/tubing/technic···rt_5.asp
I have actually tried xylene (marked with "D" on that list) and while it did soften silicone, it did not dissolve it. Many of the chemicals marked with D are not practical for one reason or another.
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Coma
Thanks Steve
Premium
join:2001-12-30
NirvanaLand
reply to aurgathor
said by aurgathor:

said by nunya:

What type of surface are you removing the caulk from?
Wood

Have you tried a propane torch yet ?

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. . . seeking professional help . . .


Tursiops_G
Technoid
Premium,MVM
join:2002-02-06
Norwalk, CT
kudos:1
reply to aurgathor
Try "Stoddard Solvent" (aka White Solvent Paint Thinner)... You should be able to get it at your local Paint Supply store.

It won't Dissolve Silicone, but it should help to soften it up a bit, and make it easier to remove... It may darken/raise the grain in the wood, but since you're going to be painting over it anyway, that shouldn't be an issue.

-Tursiops_G.
--
If You're Unsure, "RTFM"... If You're SURE, "RTFM" Anyway.


nunya
LXI 483
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:12
Reviews:
·Charter
·voip.ms
·surpasshosting
reply to aurgathor
I think a scraper and elbow grease is going to be your final answer. Since silicone is already soft, I don't think softening it up is going to help. To me, I think that would actually make it harder to remove.

I'd pa-ruse the paint aisle and see if you can find a scraper with the shape(s) for your application. Is this wood cedar siding? Petrified logs? Oak floor? Coffin lid?
--
Looks like Reverend Wright got his wish - God Damn America.


Lone Wolf
Retired
Premium
join:2001-12-30
USA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Verizon Online DSL
reply to aurgathor
Does this help?

»cool.conservation-us.org/coolaic···007.html
quote:
REMOVAL OF SILICONE ADHESIVES
David Erhardt

REMOVAL OF SILICONE ADHESIVES is a problem which conservators are encountering more and more often. Silicones are thermally stable and difficult to dissolve. Mechanical removal is one possibility. For certain substrates, chemical degradation of the silicone can also be considered.

Silicone resins are decomposed by strong acids such as sulfric or concentrated hydrochloric acid. Decomposition can be accelerated by swelling the resin, which can be done with polar organic solvents. Swelling and acid attack can be combined by mixing an alkylbenzenesulfonic acid, which is comparable in strength to sulfuric acid, with non-ionizing polar organic solvents such as dichloromethane, toluene or xylenes. Alkylbenzenesulfonic acid in non-ionizing solvents is rather unreactive to many metals but aluminum, iron, lead, copper and tin are slowly etched, probably due to traces of water which allow the acid to ionize. Stainless steel seems unaffected, as are the glasses and ceramics we have tested. Some glasses or low fired ceramics which contain carbonates may react, although the mixture can be applied to limestone with no visible reaction unless water is added. Plexiglas, Lexan, Mylar and polyethelene show no effects after contact, although one suspects that the solvents could cause effects like delayed crazing. The mixture should not be used on porous, acid sensitive materials like paper or textiles.

Either organic solvents or water can be used to rinse off the degraded silicone. Water works because the alkylbenzenesulfonic ion is a good surfactant which serves to emulsify the mixture. The choice of rinse will depend on the substrate. Water is the best choice on materials like Plexiglas, but solvents should be used on acid-sensitive materials like metal and ceramics.

The following formula has been used in this lab to remove old silicone repairs from glass objects:

* 10 mL dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid, available in kg bottles from: Pfaltz and Bauer375 Fairfield AvenueStamford, CT
* 8 mL dichloromethane (methylene chloride)
* 5 mL toluene
* 18 mL xylenes

The fumes should not be inhaled nor the liquid be allowed to contact skin.

OCP
Premium
join:2004-10-11
USA
A sharp knife/scraper would be far safer and easier to get.

If you can get ahold of those chemicals, be VERY careful and read the MSDS on them. The quote was about LAB use. You'll also be labeled as a suspected terrorist or running a drug lab in your garage. I knew someone that was sent to the hospital after exposure to one of those chemicals.


rex0

join:2002-02-10

1 edit
reply to aurgathor
I've only ever scraped, but I've seen a Dap product called silicon-be-gone which is a sulfuric acid and some type of organic solvent. Similar to but much much safer then that lab formula. It might be worth a shot. I don't think it will really dissolve it, but it's supposed to soften and loosen the bond.

Kearnstd
Space Elf
Premium
join:2002-01-22
Mullica Hill, NJ
kudos:1
reply to aurgathor
what about a heat gun? or in a pinch a blow dryer. seems heat would make it a bit softer too.
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aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1
reply to aurgathor
I didn't try heat gun, but I'll do when it stops raining....

Silicone-be-gone is also a good suggestion, though I'm not sure how it will effect wood.
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aztecnology
O Rly?
Premium
join:2003-02-12
Murrieta, CA
reply to aurgathor
Easy cleanup for silicone is alcohol, of the isopropyl vintage...


aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1
For the dried and fully cured variety?
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AnonEMouse

@rr.com
reply to aurgathor
isopropyl alcohol will do nothing to cured silicone..

denatured alcohol will soften/loosen it up, but you still need elbow grease to get it completely off.

I would be wary of Silicon-Be-Gone, looks like it could stain the wood/cause bleed-through in the paint:

»docs.google.com/gview?a=v&q=cach···6001.pdf

Ideal for Use on:•Porcelain•Ceramic Tile•Fiberglass•Stainless Steel•Most Plastics•Glass•Formica •Concrete •Granite •Chrome Plated Brass

Note: Always test in a inconspicuous area prior to use. Will damage nylon. May damage or discolor some metals, painted and synthetic finishes or treated wood surfaces.