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rjackal
Premium
join:2002-07-09
Plymouth, MI

Kitchen faucet: fix or replace?

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kitchen faucet
I have a single handle American Standard kitchen faucet with sprayer. We've been in the house for 5 years, I would guess the faucet is at least 10 years old. When the faucet is turned on, it seems to be leaking/dribbling from the large rubber washer under the handle (the beige/black area in the picture) . The water is somehow finding its way under the fixture and dripping underneath. There don't appear to be any "user-tightenable" things here or anyway to replace the washer.

Should I just replace the faucet?
--
Scott Bourne’s iPhones are not insured for acts of God; God is insured for acts of Scott Bourne.


seaquake
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-23
Millersville, MD

1 edit

You have to take the handle off to get at the meat of the problem. It's probably worn gaskets inside that you can't see. I'd opt for spending a couple of bucks on replacement parts and try to fix it yourself. If no luck there, then go ahead and replace it.

Check out American Standard's website. They probably have troubleshooting guides on there. Faucets are all basically built the same with only one or two variations on how they work...at least that has been my experience with them.

EDIT: I should add that the nut to remove the handle is probably under the hot/cold grommet or whatever it is at the front bottom. They're typically alan (I've never had to spell this word before.....the hex type) screws. A couple of twists and the handle will pull off and you will get to the inner mechanism.


HarryH3
Premium
join:2005-02-21
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Suddenlink
reply to rjackal

First, turn off the water under the sink. Both the hot and cold valves. See that red and blue insignia on the front of the control handle? It pulls out, revealing a set screw that holds the handle to the faucet stem. Loosen the screw and lift the handle off. Then you'll be able to see the rest of the mechanism. You may need to replace the seals, or the ring that holds things in place may have just loosened a bit.

It appears that the lower edge of the bast is already corroding, so if aesthetics are a concern then look at replacement faucets. If money is tight and you just want to stop the leaking, tighten the ring that holds things in place or purchase and install a repair kit.



rjackal
Premium
join:2002-07-09
Plymouth, MI

Nice tip about the hot/cold icon hiding some type of screw. I took it out and didn't immediately see any screw behind it, but I'll investigate more closely tomorrow.

The crud you see is not really corrosion, just mineral deposits from leaking water.
--
Scott Bourne’s iPhones are not insured for acts of God; God is insured for acts of Scott Bourne.



rockotman
...Blown On The Steel Breeze
Emerging Research
join:2000-08-06
DSotM
kudos:2
reply to rjackal

I installed that same faucet when I remodeled my kitchen back in 2003. It developed the same type of leak last year. I was highly disappointed that an American Standard product was so shodilly made.

As stated above, turn off the water and pull out the hot/cold cover plug. The set screw is an allen head, and when you losen it, you can remove the handle (provided it is not too corroded inside).

I stripped mine down all the way (there is a collar inside that you need to pop out, and the entire inner workings are held in by a couple of screws). There are no washers, per se, inside. It is a brass assembly with o-rings, springs, seats, and ports. I could not find any worn parts; I replaced the o-rings and it seemed to solve the leak for a few months. But earlier this year, it started leaking again, and I got disgusted and replaced the entire faucet.

One other thought... does that unit have the spray hose attachment? I had an earlier problem with the unit where water would leak past the hose connection at the spray end, and, unseen, drip down the outside of the hose, and end up under the sink in the cabinet. In that case, I picked up a new spray end to stop the leak.

No more AS kitchen faucets for me.
--
That's how you be great! That's how you be great! Oh my goodness man, we did it, baby!


Langning
Premium
join:2003-04-28
Marlborough, MA
reply to rjackal

Since most faucet has limited lifetime warranty (whatever that means), can one ship a leaky faucet back to the manufacturer and demand a new one?

I am not sure but I think the single-handle faucet uses "cartridge" that must be replaced as an unit. I replaced our faucet more than 10 years ago with this faucet and it still works perfectly. I have the Delta high arc faucet and it looks better and is easy to clean the sink area.


Daarken
Rara Avises
Premium
join:2005-01-12
Southwest LA
kudos:3

1 recommendation

reply to rjackal

If you do decide to replace it, a plumber I know recommened using Delta faucets.. They are not the best, but Delta doesn't reinvent the wheel every year, so the parts are easy to find and replace.
--
Getting it Done.



seaquake
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-23
Millersville, MD
reply to Langning

I've had three kitchen faucets; one that was here when I moved in and two replacements (over 12 years time). The first one was cartridge based. The second was the ball-n-washer type. I'm not sure what the third one is since I just installed it this spring and hope I don't have to mess with it for many years.



tmh

@verizon.net
reply to rjackal

said by rjackal:

Should I just replace the faucet?
Price out the replacement parts. I had an old Elkay that needed a replacement cartridge costing $60. I went for a Moen that was on sale at Home Depot for $80 that looked and worked better than the one I had.