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TheRedDuke

@ncsu.edu

Access to Clear Modem?

Is there a way to change settings for the Clear modem. Like for example according to people Ive spoke with both the router and the modem have DHCP turned on which could affect signal and quality of speed. So I was wondering if there's a homepage for the modem with all the settings there that I can access. Like how for linksys routers it's 192.168.1.1

I just got it 2 days ago in Raleigh, NC. So far it's OKAY. The webpages are loading kinda slow though when compared to TWC.

However I think it's cuz we're in the middle of the transition. Also I was using it on my mom's laptop wirelessly connected to the Linksys router.

I have the Clear Voice as well which so far seems to be exactly the same as TWC phone service.

But my main issue is to get to the Motorola modems home page so I can look at the settings.

IS that possible or not?



w0g
o.O

join:2001-08-30
Springfield, OR

If you have the CPEi 25150, it definitely has what you're talking about. The default address is usually »192.168.15.1/ - you can also try "http://mywimax./" and if none of these work, try the address of your connections default gateway (ipconfig /all).

Password by default is motorola.
--
www.aimless.us - irc.aimless.us channel #fix



TheRedDuke

@ncsu.edu
reply to TheRedDuke

Thanks! Do you have to be connected directly thru ethernet to do so?

Also I have a Linksys Router and Clear Voice.

I know the Linksys router has DHCP enabled and I want to keep it that way and disable the DHCP on all the other devices. That should improve the latency for WiMax right? Cuz right now my download speeds and uploads are decent but the webpage loading is kinda slow. So that's why I want to log in to look at the settings and see what I can do to improve that part.



Keithf

@pcc.edu

I have a similar setup -- Motorola modem and home router with Linksys VOIP module in between. I can connect to the 192.168.15.1 Motorola modem just fine.
However -- The Motorola model does NAT (Network Address Translation) as (probably) does your home router that your computers connect to. If your computer uses any IP address not in the 192.168.15.xxx range then this proves your home router is using NAT and translating the IP address from the modem into a different range of IP addresses. In this case you probably should not disable DHCP on your home router -- it will make it complicated and you'll have to to configure static IP addreses on your home computers, as well as DNS server info, gateway address, etc. The reason for this is that DHCP will not pass through a NAT device, the nature of NAT renders requires this behavior.



w0g
o.O

join:2001-08-30
Springfield, OR
reply to TheRedDuke

Here's what I did. I have the Linksys WRT610N - I don't know if the default firmware will let you do this, but with DD-WRT custom firmware I disabled NAT, DHCP and all that on the Linksys and it's acting strictly as a router rather than gateway. The Motorola DHCP is passing IPs and handling the firewall duties.
--
www.aimless.us - irc.aimless.us channel #fix



TheRedDuke

@clearwire-wmx.net
reply to TheRedDuke

I have the Linksys WRT610N as well...weird coincidence.

Anyways I'd rather not disable the routers settings. I like those. Wouldn't I be fine just disabling DHCP on the Clear Modem (the motorola one)?



w0g
o.O

join:2001-08-30
Springfield, OR
reply to TheRedDuke

You can still use the features on the 610N, wireless will work, quality of service, the switch, it just turns off the second NAT and redundant features on your router and frees up resources. It's more efficient to turn off the gateway features on the router instead and let the modem handle IP address assignment and whatnot because NAT can't currently be disabled. Still I don't think the difference will be major if instead you went into the modem and gave the router a persistent IP address and then forwarded (DMZ feature) all traffic to the router and used the router to manage everything.
--
www.aimless.us - irc.aimless.us channel #fix



TheRedDuke

@clearwire-wmx.net

I'm just saying if i choose "disable dhcp" for the modem and I do NOTHING else

Will that destroy the internet/wireless at my house? Will everything work properly as before?

That's the most important thing....forget all that other stuff you were saying.

If I simply uncheck the "dhcp enabled" box within the WiMax modem will my internet continue going on like before of have I done something major which requires other things to be done?


gpctexas

join:2004-02-10
Odessa, TX

I you disable dhcp on the clear modem, you will have to assign a static ip address to your wan interface of your linksys router so the 2 devices can still talk to each other. You will also have to assign a default route to route the traffic from your linksys router to the clear modem.



TheRedDuke

@clearwire-wmx.net
reply to TheRedDuke

"I you disable dhcp on the clear modem, you will have to assign a static ip address to your wan interface of your linksys router so the 2 devices can still talk to each other. You will also have to assign a default route to route the traffic from your linksys router to the clear modem."

Okay now we're getting somewhere....

As for assigning the Static IP address to my Linksys Router would I do that before or after I disable the DHCP on the clear modem?

And what exactly do you mean default route to route the traffic"

What does that involve? I'm sorry but I need specifics...steps would be nice.


gpctexas

join:2004-02-10
Odessa, TX

Check your linksys router manual to se if it supports adding routes

you will need a route that states 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 be sent to 192.168.15.1

your wan ip can be 192.168.15.2 mask 255.255.255.0



TheRedDuke

@clearwire-wmx.net
reply to TheRedDuke

If I don't do this whole "route business" what will happen if I just simply uncheck enable dhcp?



w0g
o.O

join:2001-08-30
Springfield, OR
reply to TheRedDuke

May I ask why you want to do that anyway? You have to assign your router an IP, what's the problem with using DHCP? In my case the only reason I made such a configuration was to free resources on the router for other tasks. In your case there's nothing to gain.
--
www.aimless.us - irc.aimless.us channel #fix


gpctexas

join:2004-02-10
Odessa, TX

1 edit
reply to TheRedDuke

Your linksys router will not be able to send traffic to the clear modem to get on the internet.

The clear modem is supplying all this already to your linksys router with dhcp.



TheRedDuke

@clearwire-wmx.net
reply to w0g

@ wOg

Because the webpages are loading very slowly over here and I'm trying to do all I can to make the internet as fast or faster than when we had time warner cable.

If i disable DHCP on the Linksys router will I have to do anything after that?



BK

join:2001-09-10
Chicago, IL
reply to TheRedDuke

disabling DHCP won't make it (noticeably) faster
--
-formerly sMoKeNiNja



w0g
o.O

join:2001-08-30
Springfield, OR
reply to TheRedDuke

It won't make it at all faster, all DHCP does is assign IP and DNS. There will be no difference in performance, and you will lose functionality such as NetBIOS resolution of the modem and the modems auto configuration ability.
--
www.aimless.us - irc.aimless.us channel #fix



TheRedDuke

@rr.com
reply to TheRedDuke

Ok thanks for answering that clearly and with no run around.

So double NAT and DHCP isn't the issue then right?

I've noticed that the latency (or Ping) with TWC was between 19 and 25 ms.

And with Clear 4G/WiMax it's usually around 99. The lowest I've seen the latency (Ping) is 78 ms.

And from what I've read latency determines how fast webpages will load. So I'm asking you guys is that true? Is there anything else I can do that will decrease the latency? My setup right now is this.

Clear Modem (Motorola Device) ---> Clear Voice (VoIP) ---> Linksys WRT610N



BK

join:2001-09-10
Chicago, IL
reply to TheRedDuke

Latency is a factor in how fast a webpage will load, yes. The bandwidth of your connection also plays a factor, as well as the bandwidth of the websites server too.

You are never going to get the speeds from a wireless connection as you will a wired one. plain and simple. if you aren't happy with it now switch back to TWC
--
-formerly sMoKeNiNja



TheRedDuke

@clearwire-wmx.net

Uhh my connection was wireless with TWC too so stop with the whole wired vs wireless argument.

If one provide can give me excellent service using wireless internet I expect the same from another company who's competing for my business.

And your whole "everything should be wired" is just dumb. So I should use Ethernet cables for my 2 laptops, my iPhone (which is impossible in case you didn't know), my 360 Arcade, my playstation 3, AND my gaming desktop?

Umm yeah sure I'll get back to you on that!

Again is there anything I can do to lower the latency on my end?



w0g
o.O

join:2001-08-30
Springfield, OR
reply to TheRedDuke

Not really, you can tweak your OS a bit. Google "Windows Vista TCP/IP tweaks". There's a way Windows handles packets to send full sized packets that can add latency. In some applications, latency can be reduced 40ms, such as WoW. Vista / 7 disable some newer / advanced TCP/IP features you can tweak.
--
www.aimless.us - irc.aimless.us channel #fix



w0g
o.O

join:2001-08-30
Springfield, OR
reply to TheRedDuke

And disable all P2P applications, servers, and other applications when you need low latency.
--
www.aimless.us - irc.aimless.us channel #fix


desreversti

join:2002-09-03
San Antonio, TX
reply to TheRedDuke

said by TheRedDuke :

Uhh my connection was wireless with TWC too so stop with the whole wired vs wireless argument.

If one provide can give me excellent service using wireless internet I expect the same from another company who's competing for my business.

And your whole "everything should be wired" is just dumb. So I should use Ethernet cables for my 2 laptops, my iPhone (which is impossible in case you didn't know), my 360 Arcade, my playstation 3, AND my gaming desktop?

Umm yeah sure I'll get back to you on that!

Again is there anything I can do to lower the latency on my end?
I think that BK was referring to the "last mile" when he mentioned wired versus wireless. For TWC to work, they ran a wired connection to your house and then you used a wi-fi router to get a short range wireless network in your house. For Clear, they use a wireless connection from a base station to your Clear modem. Then you can use a wi-fi conection to give your local network a wireless connection.

I would have to agree that in terms of last mile connectivity, a wired connection is superior over a wireless one.


BK

join:2001-09-10
Chicago, IL
reply to TheRedDuke

said by TheRedDuke :

Uhh my connection was wireless with TWC too so stop with the whole wired vs wireless argument.

If one provide can give me excellent service using wireless internet I expect the same from another company who's competing for my business.

And your whole "everything should be wired" is just dumb. So I should use Ethernet cables for my 2 laptops, my iPhone (which is impossible in case you didn't know), my 360 Arcade, my playstation 3, AND my gaming desktop?

Umm yeah sure I'll get back to you on that!

Again is there anything I can do to lower the latency on my end?
desreversti is correct, i was referring to your actual connection not your home wireless.

and yes, if you only care about latency, everything should be wired. that is the nature of the technology of wired vs wireless. but in home wireless situations the range is not very long so the difference is not noticeable.

i'm 100% seriously when i say if the latency is bothering you that much just switch back to TWC because there isn't anything you can do
--
-formerly sMoKeNiNja

Broo

join:2010-01-01
reply to TheRedDuke

WiMax latency is going to be around 100ms; it will never be as fast as a hard-wired connection (i.e. Cable/DSL/FIOS) as it is a wireless technology.

I have had Clear WiMax in Atlanta, GA for about 5 months now; average is around 100ms (vs. 10ms on BellSouth DSL).

Another thing to note is that Clear WiMax is very prone to slow-downs during peak hours (I believe they oversold it in the Atlanta area) and they are now cap bandwidth if you saturate your connection for more than 10 mins. I am seeing a drop to 1Mbps after I use my connection for about 10 mins...



w0g
o.O

join:2001-08-30
Springfield, OR
reply to TheRedDuke

WiMAX is capable of latency as low as 10ms, Clear is just not currently not optimizing their network for latency.
--
www.aimless.us - irc.aimless.us channel #fix



epik_x

@clearwire-wmx.net
reply to TheRedDuke

My ping in chicago suburbs is usually around 50ms-60ms.



jt

@clearwire-wmx.net
reply to TheRedDuke

I'm in San Antonio, TX. My latency is from 50 to 120+ ms, with a typical of 80-100ms. I don't think there's anything you can do to improve that, unless perhaps there's a base station on your roof, under which I don't want to live...:P

But I do have a slowdown problem when connecting my computer to the Clear home modem through a wireless router (Netgear WGR614v6) wirelessly. If I use the Netgear's wired LAN port, I get a great 6-11Mbps throughput, with 9-11Mbps not unusual. But if I connect through the Netgear's wireless channel, I get around 2Mbps all the time. Any ideas?


kram1984j

join:2009-12-06

1 edit

hmm it's fast connected through your wifi modem wired but slow over wireless.... Have you seen faster speeds with that same wifi modem connected to your previous ISP or did you experience the same problems?


ygtai

join:2010-01-05
San Antonio, TX

said by kram1984j:

hmm it's fast connected through your wifi modem wired but slow over wireless.... Have you seen faster speeds with that same wifi modem connected to your previous ISP or did you experience the same problems?
With my previous ISP (TWC RoadRunner 7Mbps) I constantly got a stable 6.5-6.8Mbps, no matter wired or wireless.

So I suspected it were WiMAX Wi-Fi interference. I did a little test trying to identify it using a desktop computer (wired to router) and a notebook computer (wireless to router).

1) Background transfer between desktop (wired) and notebook (wireless) using iperf I got 16-20Mbps. So wired to wireless on the router is normal.

2) In addition to the desktop-notebook transfer, I tested internet (speedtest.net) to notebook (wireless) at the same time. I got 10-17Mbps desktop-notebook and 2Mbps internet-notebook. So it looks that Wi-Fi was not affected by WiMAX too much.

3) Then in addition to the test in 2), I added internet to desktop (wired) test at the same time. I still got 10-17Mbps desktop-notebook, 2Mbps internet-notebook, and 7-9Mbps internet-desktop. The combined WiMAX speed was still fast. It seems that WiMAX was not affected as well.

So it's probably not interference. Then I don't get it. Changing MTU probably doesn't help because it was set to 1500 and I only care about downstream. Double NAT is also not a problem because it's fast when wired. What else could it be?