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John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8
reply to aurgathor

Re: plastic box vs. metal box (electrical)

In residential applications I usually use plastic, unless it is for something specific like the range or other larger conductor applications.

Less grounding involved...and far easier with built-in cable clamps.

If you treat plastic boxes with reasonable care (meaning don't strip them), they will last a long time.

I've had people request all metal, though. They paid for it...time and materials.

--
The man who speaks to you of sacrifice is speaking of slaves and masters, and intends to be the master.

dsless

join:2001-05-16
Pittsburgh, PA
Steel is easy for light switches and receptacles! How about some nice Raco or Steel City stuff!


John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8

1 recommendation

said by dsless:

Steel is easy for light switches and receptacles! How about some nice Raco or Steel City stuff!
Yeah, but now you are looking at the cost of the bracket box, two cable connectors (or more), mudring and grounding pigtail.

Price THAT and compare it to the cost of a plastic box...

Plus the time (expensive) to dink around and assemble that. I can nail up 10 plastic boxes in the time it takes you to put one metal one together.

Just saying...


--
The man who speaks to you of sacrifice is speaking of slaves and masters, and intends to be the master.


whizkid3
Premium,MVM
join:2002-02-21
Queens, NY
kudos:9
said by John Galt:

I can nail up 10 plastic boxes in the time it takes you to put one metal one together.
Use the right metal box and it goes in just as fast. While you're busy attaching the ground wire to the switch or receptacle - or worse yet, wiring the grounds together with a Greenie, we've moved on to the next box.


nunya
LXI 483
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:12
reply to John Galt
Try nailing that plastic box to steel studs .


John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8
reply to whizkid3
said by whizkid3:

...we've moved on to the next box.
You still haven't priced it..!


--
The man who speaks to you of sacrifice is speaking of slaves and masters, and intends to be the master.


John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8
reply to nunya
said by nunya:

Try nailing that plastic box to steel studs .
This is the HOME Repair and Improvement Forum.



Not too many metal studs in homes...although you can get flatter walls with metal studs.
--
The man who speaks to you of sacrifice is speaking of slaves and masters, and intends to be the master.

dsless

join:2001-05-16
Pittsburgh, PA
reply to whizkid3
said by whizkid3:

said by John Galt:

I can nail up 10 plastic boxes in the time it takes you to put one metal one together.
Use the right metal box and it goes in just as fast. While you're busy attaching the ground wire to the switch or receptacle - or worse yet, wiring the grounds together with a Greenie, we've moved on to the next box.
The steel boxes we used had 2 nails into a 2X4 and move on to the next box. And one little greenie with the install. My dad was an electrical contractor. I started hanging boxes when I was 13 (about 1972-73) and could do it in my sleep. There were no plastic boxes back then!


Nick_L
Premium
join:2003-01-22
Pittsburgh, PA

1 edit
said by dsless :

I started hanging boxes when I was 13 (about 1972-73) and could do it in my sleep. There were no plastic boxes back then!
That's not actually true. My parents had their house built in 1963 and the entire home, including ceiling boxes, was done in plastic. It wasn't the more flexible blue or grey plastic that is used today, it was more of a brown bakelite type plastic, but plastic none the less.

Nick

P.s. Hey, another 'Burgher!

dsless

join:2001-05-16
Pittsburgh, PA
I forgot about them. I have not done this for a long time.