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jlivingood
Premium,VIP
join:2007-10-28
Philadelphia, PA
kudos:2

2 edits

2 recommendations

New Comcast IPv6 Information

Comcast just announced that we plan to conduct real, production-network trials of IPv6 technology this year, with customers. The transition from IPv4 addresses to IPv6 addresses is a necessity, as many of you doubtless know, since the available pool of IPv4 addresses will at some point be exhausted for all Internet users.

The trials we plan to conduct in 2010 will help us to identify and solve any areas of difficulty involved in the transition to IPv6, and to determine what approach will be the easiest and most seamless for our customers. Comcast will continue to share what we learn with the Internet community, particularly with the IETF (»www.ietf.org), for the benefit of other users of the Internet.

Customers who are interested in volunteering to participate in these IPv6 trials can express their interest using the online form on the new Comcast IPv6 Information Center website, at »www.comcast6.net. We anticipate conducting several technical trials, beginning in the second quarter of this year.

You can see a post on the Comcast blog about this at »blog.comcast.com/2010/01/prepari···ion.html We have also announced our trial plans in forums, on our Network Management site at »networkmanagement.comcast.net, as well as on the above-noted Comcast IPv6 Information Center website at »www.comcast6.net. Lastly, should you happen to be using an IPv6 address now, you can access our Comcast.Net portal at »ipv6.comcast.net.

Here are the trials we anticipate conducting in 2010:
• Trial #1 will evaluate tunneling IPv6 over IPv4, using "6RD" technology. 6RD is an open Internet standard developed in the IETF's "Softwires" working group. This trial enables us to explore how we may be able to provide production level IPv6 service to customers who have only been issued IPv4 addresses by the ISP network.
• Trial #2 will evaluate a native Dual-Stack IPv6 deployment. We will test issuing both IPv4 and IPv6 addresses to the customer premise. This trial will attempt to suit a variety of customer premise configurations, and will evolve over time as the customer premise equipment (CPE) support for IPv6 matures. Native dual-stack is central to our IPv6 strategy and we expect that the native dual-stack solution will be a significant part of the IPv6 transition, enabling IPv6 technology to evolve globally while still being able to provide seamless services to the traditional IPv4 Internet.
• Trial #3 will evaluate tunneling IPv4 over IPv6, using "Dual-Stack Lite" technology (aka DS-Lite). DS-Lite is an open standard defined in the IETF's “Softwires” working group. DS-Lite will involve provisioning only an IPv6 address at the customer premise, and creating an IPv4 over IPv6 tunnel between the customer's home gateway and an Address Family Transition Router (AFTR) in our network. That AFTR enables sharing IPv4 addresses among DS-Lite IPv6 customers. DS-Lite can be seen as the mirror image of 6RD; 6RD enables IPv6 service to IPv4 customers, whereas DS-Lite enables IPv4 service to IPv6 customers. DS-Lite offers the ability to continue an IPv4 service when IPv4 addresses are no longer readily available or are otherwise constrained.
• Trial #4 will evaluate how to deploy IPv6 to our Business Class customers, on a native Dual-Stack IPv6 basis.

In order to put these trials in context, we envision the transition to IPv6 within ISP networks to generally occur in three phases:
• Phase 1: The ISP network does not support IPv6, only IPv4 addresses are issued, and in order to access IPv6 resources a user must tunnel IPv6 traffic over IPv4. In our network, this may be a very short time or may be skipped altogether, but it is important to explore cases where portions of the access network cannot transition to native IPv6 support for whatever reason. Trial #1 focuses on this phase using the 6RD technology.
• Phase 2: Native IPv4 and IPv6, also referred to as dual-stack, supported in CPE and the ISP network, where both IPv4 and IPv6 addresses are issued. This is an important phase to evaluate and it will likely persist in ISP networks for an extended period of time, probably several years, until IPv4 addresses are severely constrained or are no longer available. While we hope to have a solution for each transition phase, this one is the most important for us and our customers. Trials #2 and #4 focus on this phase, for residential and business services, respectively.
• Phase 3: IPv6-only service, when only IPv6 addresses are issued by the ISP network and new IPv4 addresses are no longer available. This is probably some time off in the future, though when it occurs it is likely that access to IPv4-only resources may involve tunneling IPv4 traffic over IPv6. Trial #3 focuses on this phase using the DS-Lite technology.

Once again, if you are a Comcast customer and are interested in volunteering to participate in these IPv6 trials, please use the online form at »www.comcast6.net/volunteer.php.

We hope that our production network trials will encourage other stakeholders to make plans to continue or to begin work on IPv6 in 2010, so that all stakeholders do their part to ensure that the future of the Internet is as bright and innovative as it has been in the past. Along those lines, the Internet Society, of which we are a big supporter, has a section of their website focused on this issue that you may find informative, at »www.isoc.org/pubpolpillar/issues···ng.shtml.

We're happy to take any questions you may have.

Thanks
Jason
--
JL
Comcast


andyross
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-04
Schaumburg, IL

It's been noticed the latest SB6120 firmware added some IP mode info on the configuration page, so it looks like it may be able to support IPv6.

How many, if any, home-oriented routers support IPv6?



jjmb

join:2009-12-01
USA

1 recommendation

said by andyross:

It's been noticed the latest SB6120 firmware added some IP mode info on the configuration page, so it looks like it may be able to support IPv6.

How many, if any, home-oriented routers support IPv6?
DOCSIS 3.0 modems have been specified to support IPv6. The new information you are seeing on the modem is an extension of introducing support for IPv6 into DOCSIS.

There is a growing population of home routers/gateways that support IPv6.

In advance of our various trial phases we will share information about the various types of devices we are aware of (and tested) that can be used as part of our trials.

John


Cabal
Premium
join:2007-01-21
reply to jlivingood

Signed up, thanks for the info. Looking forward to phase 2.



JTC
Always Mount A Scratch Monkey

join:2002-01-09
USA
reply to jlivingood

*sighs*

Sad, business class is trial #4. Looks like I'm going to be using HE for a while yet.
--
All hardware sucks, all software sucks, some just suck more than others



inferno4

join:2008-07-06

4 edits

1 recommendation

reply to jlivingood

Just bought the SB6120 modem and signed up for the beta.

Let me test it out! Turn that baby on!!



My ddwrt router is ready also!


So is my computer!


OCP
Premium
join:2004-10-11
USA
reply to jjmb

said by jjmb :
There is a growing population of home routers/gateways that support IPv6.
Is there a list somewhere? I'm seeing only commercial grade and open source stuff. Not that there's anything wrong with that.

I have a lot to learn, and I would expect to need some new hardware in the next couple of years.


jjmb

join:2009-12-01
USA

said by OCP:

said by jjmb :
There is a growing population of home routers/gateways that support IPv6.
Is there a list somewhere? I'm seeing only commercial grade and open source stuff. Not that there's anything wrong with that.

I have a lot to learn, and I would expect to need some new hardware in the next couple of years.
We have not yet posted a list. As the time nears expect to see some additional information from us. We are working closely with home gateway vendors to ensure products support all the necessary IPv6 requirements.

Thanks,

John


jjmb

join:2009-12-01
USA
reply to JTC

said by JTC:

*sighs*

Sad, business class is trial #4. Looks like I'm going to be using HE for a while yet.
Do you have a DOCSIS or non-DOCSIS commercial service?

John


jjmb

join:2009-12-01
USA
reply to inferno4

said by inferno4:

Just bought the SB6120 modem and signed up for the beta.

Let me test it out! Turn that baby on!!



My ddwrt router is ready also!


So is my computer!

It is important to note that the screen shot of your modem specifically identifies the IP mode used to manage the modem, which is largely unrelated to the version(s) of IP extended to CPEs in the home.

I have one question about your router/gateway. I do not see any way to specify how the WAN interface is provisioned. Can you elaborate as to whether or not the image you are using supports stateful DHCPv6 (RFC3315) on the WAN interface.

Thanks,

John


JTC
Always Mount A Scratch Monkey

join:2002-01-09
USA
reply to jjmb

said by jjmb:

said by JTC:

*sighs*

Sad, business class is trial #4. Looks like I'm going to be using HE for a while yet.
Do you have a DOCSIS or non-DOCSIS commercial service?

John
Pretty sure it's DOCSIS. I'm on the 12/2 business tier with statics.
--
All hardware sucks, all software sucks, some just suck more than others


inferno4

join:2008-07-06

4 edits
reply to jjmb

said by jjmb:

It is important to note that the screen shot of your modem specifically identifies the IP mode used to manage the modem, which is largely unrelated to the version(s) of IP extended to CPEs in the home.

I have one question about your router/gateway. I do not see any way to specify how the WAN interface is provisioned. Can you elaborate as to whether or not the image you are using supports stateful DHCPv6 (RFC3315) on the WAN interface.

Thanks,

John
I am using DD-WRT firmware on my router, looking for that but seem I can't find it. Anyone else know if ddwrt has that?

Edit, I think it does from this tutorial --> »www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/IP···your_LAN
(looks like a nightmare to get working though T_T )

Edit #2, seems that is only talking about giving wireless connections IPv6 addresses

Jeremy W

join:2010-01-21

said by inferno4:

Anyone else know if ddwrt has that?
It doesn't.


inferno4

join:2008-07-06

said by Jeremy W:

said by inferno4:

Anyone else know if ddwrt has that?
It doesn't.
DD-WRT is normally the best, what actually has that then?

Jeremy W

join:2010-01-21

said by inferno4:

DD-WRT is normally the best, what actually has that then?
No clue. I just know that DD-WRT's IPv6 support is for tunneling, not native IPv6 from your ISP.

AVonGauss
Premium
join:2007-11-01
Boynton Beach, FL
reply to inferno4

Not as an endorsement of them per se, but the D-Link DIR-615 (rev C) and DIR-825 both support native IPv6 on the WAN side. They also support IPv6 tunnels on the router, but I believe in practice there are still a few "quirks" with the tunnel support. There are many more routers that have basic support for IPv6 on the LAN side but do not support IPv6 on the WAN side. I'm not aware of any residential router that provides any advanced features such as connection filtering for IPv6 clients behind the router.



ropeguru
Premium
join:2001-01-25
Mechanicsville, VA
reply to jjmb

said by jjmb:

said by JTC:

*sighs*

Sad, business class is trial #4. Looks like I'm going to be using HE for a while yet.
Do you have a DOCSIS or non-DOCSIS commercial service?

John
I am in the same situation. I am a business class customer on a DOCSIS 3 service using the SMC D3 router/gateway.

I have been inquiring about this with my sales rep but never can seem to get a real answer. Thanks for this update on it. I will forward it to him.

Weatherman

join:2004-12-04
Bel Air, MD
reply to jlivingood

Would there be a chance that if we sign up for the IPv6 beta, that we could get a static IPv6 address to keep? Since there will be a huge amount of IPv6 addresses, it would be nice give us the option of using statics.

- Mark



jjmb

join:2009-12-01
USA
reply to inferno4

said by inferno4:

said by jjmb:

It is important to note that the screen shot of your modem specifically identifies the IP mode used to manage the modem, which is largely unrelated to the version(s) of IP extended to CPEs in the home.

I have one question about your router/gateway. I do not see any way to specify how the WAN interface is provisioned. Can you elaborate as to whether or not the image you are using supports stateful DHCPv6 (RFC3315) on the WAN interface.

Thanks,

John
I am using DD-WRT firmware on my router, looking for that but seem I can't find it. Anyone else know if ddwrt has that?

Edit, I think it does from this tutorial --> »www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/IP···your_LAN
(looks like a nightmare to get working though T_T )

Edit #2, seems that is only talking about giving wireless connections IPv6 addresses
If you are comfortable posting the exact firmware version and type of hardware that would be helpful.

Thanks,

John


inferno4

join:2008-07-06

said by jjmb:

said by inferno4:

said by jjmb:

It is important to note that the screen shot of your modem specifically identifies the IP mode used to manage the modem, which is largely unrelated to the version(s) of IP extended to CPEs in the home.

I have one question about your router/gateway. I do not see any way to specify how the WAN interface is provisioned. Can you elaborate as to whether or not the image you are using supports stateful DHCPv6 (RFC3315) on the WAN interface.

Thanks,

John
I am using DD-WRT firmware on my router, looking for that but seem I can't find it. Anyone else know if ddwrt has that?

Edit, I think it does from this tutorial --> »www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/IP···your_LAN
(looks like a nightmare to get working though T_T )

Edit #2, seems that is only talking about giving wireless connections IPv6 addresses
If you are comfortable posting the exact firmware version and type of hardware that would be helpful.

Thanks,

John
DD-WRT firmware is --> DD-WRT v24-sp2 (05/15/09) std
Router Model --> Netgear WNR834B v2


jlivingood
Premium,VIP
join:2007-10-28
Philadelphia, PA
kudos:2
reply to Weatherman

said by Weatherman:

Would there be a chance that if we sign up for the IPv6 beta, that we could get a static IPv6 address to keep? Since there will be a huge amount of IPv6 addresses, it would be nice give us the option of using statics.

- Mark
Agreed - and we'll take it to the team and discuss/consider.
--
JL
Comcast


jlivingood
Premium,VIP
join:2007-10-28
Philadelphia, PA
kudos:2
reply to ropeguru

said by ropeguru:

I have been inquiring about this with my sales rep but never can seem to get a real answer. Thanks for this update on it. I will forward it to him.
Go ahead and submit the trial user volunteer form (»www.comcast6.net/volunteer.php). Our initial plan was for fiber-connected commercial customers but we've seen a decent amount of interest from DOCSIS-based commercial customers, so we may revisit this with the commercial services group. Best way to help make the case is have a number of business customers who volunteered!
--
JL
Comcast


ropeguru
Premium
join:2001-01-25
Mechanicsville, VA

said by jlivingood:

said by ropeguru:

I have been inquiring about this with my sales rep but never can seem to get a real answer. Thanks for this update on it. I will forward it to him.
Go ahead and submit the trial user volunteer form (»www.comcast6.net/volunteer.php). Our initial plan was for fiber-connected commercial customers but we've seen a decent amount of interest from DOCSIS-based commercial customers, so we may revisit this with the commercial services group. Best way to help make the case is have a number of business customers who volunteered!
Request already submitted...

Thanks!!!


HunterZ

join:2003-07-16
Kent, WA
reply to jlivingood

Submitted the form. I don't think I'd be able to participate in the native IPv6 phase since my modem and routers probably don't support native IPv6, but I should be able to do the tunneling stuff.

I've got a good mix of devices:

Cable modem (Motorola SB5xxx) -> WRT54g router

WRT54g (used as gateway, running Tomato) -> Netgear router, eventually/possibly old Tivo(s)

Netgear router (used as wired+wireless switch only, WAN port not connected) -> printer, Tivo HD, WinXP/Win7 laptop (wifi), MacOSX laptop (wifi), iPhone (wifi), Wii (wifi), GigaFast router

GigaFast Router (used as wired switch only, WAN port not connected) -> Win7 desktop, WinXP desktop


kcblack
Premium
join:2000-09-11
Chicago, IL
reply to jlivingood

I've submitted mine too and from what I understand my linksys/cisco WRT-310N flashed with the Talisman software from sveasoft supports IPV6....

Kevin



pizz
bye bye twc. hello Comcast.
Premium
join:2000-10-27
Astoria, NY
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
reply to jlivingood

JL, this program is amazing! i wish TWC would do this Can you use your contacts and nudge TWC to do this )
--
I tie a rope around my penis and jump from a tree. Dont you want to grow up and be just like me.



JSchuricht

@omcastbusiness.net
reply to jlivingood

Life was so much easier with four octets.

Anyways +1 business subscriber assuming my SM3D3G will pass IPV6 natively, already have a tunnel.


Der_Idiot

join:2008-02-10
Norwood Young America, MN
reply to jlivingood

Any idea if we trial IPv6, with the availability of vastly more IP space, will we be alotted more then a single IP block?

I've got cisco hardware as well as a pfsense firewall on a 6120, and have a probability to get another 6120 with 22x5 commercial in the future (or a d3 gateway), MASPRO taps have been pulled off my node so the return SNR is more stable so here's hoping for some real trials to run (and stress my connection )



NetDog
Premium,VIP
join:2002-03-04
Parker, CO
kudos:77
reply to jlivingood

Hoping for the Denver market myself.. Using a tunnel broker currently for my dual-stack.



pflog
Bueller? Bueller?
Premium,MVM
join:2001-09-01
El Dorado Hills, CA
kudos:3
reply to JTC

said by JTC:

*sighs*

Sad, business class is trial #4. Looks like I'm going to be using HE for a while yet.
Yeah, that stinks. But I'm guessing it has something to do with how they want to handle RIP with IPv6? Residential setups are easier to work with I guess.

Still a bummer, though.
--
"Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it." -Ferris