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Anonymous_
Anonymous
Premium
join:2004-06-21
127.0.0.1
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1 edit

one of the requirements should be via fiber optic cable only

one of the requirements should be via fiber optic cable(to the house) only as D3 is just a shared hub and is slow should not count


skuv

@rr.com
said by Anonymous_:

one of the requirements should be via fiber optic cable(to the house) only as D3 is just a shared hub and is slow should not count
A fiber optic cable isn't a direct connection to the Internet either, so it is shared at some point on the ISP's network before it gets to the Internet. Show me an ISP that has every residential connection connected directly back to their peering router with no aggregation points in between, and I'll show you a company that doesn't exist, is out of business, or will soon be out of business.

And fiber optic cable doesn't have any guarantee on the speed. The speed comes from the technology. I know plenty of fiber connections that are 10mbit. So just requiring that it be fiber optic doesn't solve anything. Especially when technology is available that makes coax and twisted pair copper go much faster than 100mbit.

10gigabitethernet over copper is available today, would you call that inferior to 10gigabitethernet over fiber just because it is using copper?


tubbynet
reminds me of the danse russe
Premium,MVM
join:2008-01-16
Chandler, AZ
kudos:1
reply to Anonymous_
said by Anonymous_:

one of the requirements should be via fiber optic cable(to the house) only as D3 is just a shared hub and is slow should not count
at what point do you consider it "shared"? do you realize that *every* piece of network hardware (aside from the truly insane backbone devices) is oversubscribed, right? the reason you or i are able to pay for a d3 "tier" of speeds and not pay for the full ds3 is because of oversubscription, right?

everyone wants to think fiber is a panacea for everything. sure, but how long has it been worked on and being refined? fibers were first used in the 70s and aside from cleaning up the glass in the desired wavelength, not much has changed. when you throw fiber in the ground its still essentially the same as it was in the 70s, just different transport mechanisms over top of it.
now, coaxial cable was around *long* before docsis. docsis is a way to retrofit and reuse existing cabling to fit to the methods of delivery already in use by the cable industry before hfc-based broadband was the norm. they inherently had a disadvantage.

now - r&d for docsis has been slow, i'll give you that. however, now that there is a "market" for it, companies will want to be on the leading edge to make top-notch gear. couple that with mpeg4 video encoding, the droppage of analog stations from the cable delivery, sdv, and the push of 1ghz plant, cable has a *hell* of a lot of life left in it. don't doubt that.

i - for one - don't care about how the speed is delivered. i just want it to work.

q.
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tschmidt
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reply to Anonymous_
said by Anonymous_:

one of the requirements should be via fiber optic cable(to the house) only as D3 is just a shared hub and is slow should not count
Policy should specify performance metrics not how that performance is delivered. While I'm a big fan of FTTP I don't think it is necessarily the best solution in all cases. For folks in rural areas some form of wireless is probably a more cost effective solution.

As tubbynet See Profile posted all connections are shared at some point. Cable at the node, DSL at the DSLAM, and Fiber at the OLT. While these differences are key engineering tradeoffs when designing a network what is important from a policy perceptive is level of performance delivered to end users. Critical metric for that is level of oversubscription.

/tom


joebarnhart
Paxio evangelist

join:2005-12-15
Santa Clara, CA
reply to skuv
said by skuv :

A fiber optic cable isn't a direct connection to the Internet either, so it is shared at some point on the ISP's network before it gets to the Internet. Show me an ISP that has every residential connection connected directly back to their peering router with no aggregation points in between,
The internet itself is "shared" by your definition. It isn't important where the switches are located, as long as the provider has adequate bandwidth to pass the aggregate traffic.

My provider, Paxio, offers speeds up to 1Gbps symmetric, and they guarantee you are not impacted by other users on their network. I have the 100M symmetric service and I have never seen any slowdown due to traffic on Paxio's network.

Paxio happens to use fiber to the home, but I agree that twisted pair or coax is perfectly acceptable for 100M users. I would point out, however, that fiber is inherently more "future proof" as WDM and other technologies currently push greater than 14Gbps on a single fiber today.

cmaenginsb1
Premium
join:2001-03-19
Palmdale, CA
reply to Anonymous_
said by Anonymous_:

one of the requirements should be via fiber optic cable(to the house) only as D3 is just a shared hub and is slow should not count
Currently all FTTH deployments are shared at a neighborhood node which is essentially a "hub" so that doesn't change anything.
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