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« a LieBandwitch Cap Needs to go! »
This is a sub-selection from Turnabout...

fiberguy
My views are my own.
Premium
join:2005-05-20
kudos:3
reply to mod_wastrel

Re: Turnabout...

Um... are you in the industry at all? I am! I deal with data and networks every day... in the "definition" of the internet, they are not selling you "bandwidth" .. there ARE providers in the industry that DO sell "bandwidth" and "data".. in a residential setting, you ARE buying "internet access"... now that times are changing, they are defining the amount of data you can use..

There is such thing as contextual terms.. just about every contract you deal with will tell you that the words/terms/definitions used in that contract are based on the industry at hand.

You get real.


mod_wastrel
iamwhatiam

join:2008-03-28
kudos:1
The reality is that you don't have to be "in" some industry to expect to get the product you're paying for, which is what every customer expects. As I said, we pay for access, we expect to get access; we expect to use that access for those reasons for which we get it in the first place. If an ISP cannot deliver on its contract to provide the service and/or product that it's selling, then it should probably go out of business... and good riddance. Someone else will come along with a better business model--like (1) being a dumb pipe (which is all we actually need when it comes to "Internet access") and (2) not over-selling the service to the point that they can't deliver what they've sold you--to take its place.

There's no such thing as "excessive" bandwidth usage. There is no "exaflood". There are no "data hogs". The ISP's network is first come, first serve--everyone has the same opportunity to use their connection as everyone else. Some merely choose to use theirs more, while others use theirs less. Of course, when an ISP over-sells and the best speed that any customer can get in "prime time" is only a quarter of their "promised" [up to] speed, well, the only one to blame is the ISP, not the customers--neither the ones who use their connection a little nor the ones who use their connection a lot. That's what a network is for... a real network anyway (and, yes, I know what it means to manage a real network).

fiberguy
My views are my own.
Premium
join:2005-05-20
kudos:3

1 edit
Annnnnnnnd you're acting like a completely uninformed consumer, which is your own fault. Sorry... but just becuase you think something should be a certain way, or want it to be a certain way, doesn't make it that way.

You're in denial... "there is no such thin as "excessive" bandwidth usage.. um... there is when you go beyond typical residential use.. there is when you're consuming tb's of data per month while everyone else is WELL below 200gb..

Again, you're in denial. Access is access.. data transfer is another.. the internet's use is evolving and so are they.. you need to as well.

And so you know.. that Utopian model you want out of an ISP... which, to be honest, would be be a nice thing to have, WILL come with a BIG premium.. with that kind of dumb pipe service, in my guess, would come with a price tag of $100 or more per month.

Believe it or not, there IS a reason why these providers charge what they do today.. most of them at least.. and it's not always to "screw" the customer.. think about it.. 10 years ago, we paid $20 for a crappy dial up line and MANY paid another $25 for a phone line.. for ONE computer.. today they're charging about $27 average for internet for multiple computers.. and yet you still complain about all these things and how ISPs aren'te delivering? wow.


mod_wastrel
iamwhatiam

join:2008-03-28
kudos:1
What I deny is that you have any point. You've fallen for the "Big Lie": that it costs more to service the customer who downloads(/uploads) 1 TB compared to the one who downloads 1 GB... sorry you know so little about networking. Any usage-based billing model is "excessive" with regard to revenue. I would explain it to you except for not wanting to waste my time any further. The only time "excessive" is a term appropriate to be used by or about an ISP is when you're talking about the number of customers on a node or network segment--putting 500 customers (for example) on a node designed to support 200 customers (for example) and still provide acceptable (as in, contracted) levels of speed is not going to be very workable (for the customers, that is): demand will likely exceed supply when all 500 of them are "on" during prime time (but, that's the way the ISP designed it, so the ISP really shouldn't blame its customers for actually using their connections). I'm just amazed that there are customers (Group A) who are so concerned by how much usage other customers (Group B) are getting out of the connection they're paying for. Group B is using the network at times when Group A isn't... why, shame on them... shame, shame, shame. (OK... bored with you now.)