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ring ring

@privacyfoundation.de

When will land line phones be no more?

In your opinions when we we see the end of residential land line phones (in homes, not business related use)?


La Luna
RIP Lisa
Premium
join:2001-07-12
Warwick, NY
kudos:3
Lots of people still use landlines, why would we "see the end" of them anytime soon?


Skipdawg
The Original
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join:2001-04-19
Mount Vernon, WA
Reviews:
·Clear Wireless
reply to ring ring
Yea it's going to be awhile. Many areas still only have dial up internet as a option.

Shoot there was a place here in Washington state that just did get landline phone service for the first time about 2 years ago.

Still a need. I keep mine in place just in case.

Mele20
Premium
join:2001-06-05
Hilo, HI
kudos:5

1 recommendation

reply to ring ring
Many people live in concrete apt/condo high rise buildings here. Cell phones don't work in them. Why would I want TW cable phone instead of a real landline that is carrier class (Time Warner VoIP phone service is not) and that is regulated by the PUC? I'd be nuts to want Time Warner phone that I could not use during a power outage since a cell phone wouldn't work either inside my home. I don't see landline going anywhere for a very long time in Hawaii.
--
When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. Thomas Jefferson


ring ring

@zagbot.com
reply to ring ring
Articles like this one make me wonder how long they'll be around.
AT&T asks the FCC to set a deadline for completely phasing out wireline services.
»www.intomobile.com/2009/12/30/at···ons.html


JLevinworth

@embarqhsd.net
reply to ring ring
Not anytime even remotely soon. As Skipdawg See Profile said, many places still only have dial up.

I read online here and elsewhere that a lot of people have trouble grasping at the fact that broadband is still pretty limited in the U.S (you are talking about the U.S., right?). If they don't have that, then then that leaves dial-up/copper.

You read 'rural' areas and it gets chuckles (not aimed at you).. but that happens to be a good chunk of the U.S, and not, for the most part, the audience here.

As a quick virtual demonstration, fire up »maps.google.com and grab the street view dude. Drop golden boy anywhere around the U.S. at random (and don't try to bullseye the marked capitals). Take a spin around. What do you see? Keep dropping randomly around the country anywhere and give a look around. And this is only places that street view has even been.

It'll give you a whole new perspective. I bet you'll even find lots of polls that still have glass insulators.

-Jim
2010-03-31 20:50:06


dandelion
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Germantown, TN
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1 edit

1 recommendation

reply to ring ring
They won't be phased out as long as phone lines are more reliable then cell or internet. The disabled or people with health problems and family will keep landlines because even when the power is out and the cell phone tower is not working (which has happened here at least once in the last five years), the phone will still work to call an ambulance, or other help.


JLevinworth

@embarqhsd.net
reply to ring ring
said by ring ring :

Articles like this one make me wonder how long they'll be around.
AT&T asks the FCC to set a deadline for completely phasing out wireline services.
»www.intomobile.com/2009/12/30/at···ons.html
I can see where you might think that, but all that is is ATT's wetdream of not having the FCC force them to maintain the lines. The article even states 1 in 5 still depends on landlines in the U.S. If that's correct, that's ~61M people.

-Jim
2010-03-31 21:08:02


Fir_Na_Tine
Giggity Giggity
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join:2001-01-03
Sout Joisy
reply to ring ring
I also think it would be a long time, at least 50 years or more. Still lots of areas out there that don't have decent cell service. I do notice that most developing countries are skipping landline infrastructure for cell phone towers and service.
--
"When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace."
-Jimi Hendrix


J E F F
Whatta Ya Think About Dat?
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reply to ring ring
said by ring ring :

In your opinions when we we see the end of residential land line phones (in homes, not business related use)?
Probably never since landlines (POTS: Post Office Telephone System, now aka Plain Old Telephone System) are still more reliable then the VoIP crap that cable and DSL provides spew out. I made the mistake of giving up the landline for Rogers Home Phone. So, 20 years of not a single outage - in 3 months, 3 outages including a 24 hour one. That's what you get when you don't have a land line. Old and simple yet very effective and reliable.
--
Attention Humans; we be your pictures, release us!


seaquake
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-23
Millersville, MD
reply to ring ring
Hopefully not in my lifetime.


Snakeoil
Ignore Button. The coward's feature.
Premium
join:2000-08-05
Mentor, OH
kudos:1
reply to ring ring
when cell phones monthly rates are as cheap as land lines.
For a family of 4, 4 cell phones are more then a land line.


silentlooker
Premium
join:2009-11-01
reply to ring ring
Maybe in 50-75 years.

Mele20
Premium
join:2001-06-05
Hilo, HI
kudos:5
reply to Snakeoil
A cell phone for ONE is higher than a landline. Cellphone=$39 plus, fees, taxes, etc. A landline=$26 INCLUDING fees, taxes and $1.20 for unpublished number but not including long distance charges. So, unless you make a ton of long distance calls during business hours, a landline is much cheaper than a cell even just one cell phone for one person. Plus, with a landline you are protected by the PUC against sudden rate increases.
--
When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. Thomas Jefferson


Dude111
An Awesome Dude
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join:2003-08-04
USA
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1 edit
reply to ring ring
said by La Luna :
Lots of people still use landlines, why would we "see the end" of them anytime soon?
I agree....

LANDLINES are much more reliable than this VOIP crap!


Its a Secret
Please speak into the microphone
Premium
join:2008-02-23
Da wet coast
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1 edit
reply to ring ring
As soon as cell Co's stop gouging for service?

Oh wait... They are the LL's...


Cabal
Premium
join:2007-01-21
reply to ring ring
Haven't had one here since '01. I don't see us getting one again in the future.

Happydude32
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join:2005-07-16
kudos:1
reply to ring ring
Can't go cell only here. I'm looking down at all three of my cell phones right now, Nextel, AT&T Mobility and Verizon Wireless. AT&T, No Service, Nextel, Service but no bars , same for Verizon. Now if I walk outside, boom! All three have full bars and I can get over 2Mb down on my iPhone with full 3G. As soon as I step back in the house, back down to nothing. Until I can get some sort of cell coverage inside of my home, the landline is here to stay.

What won't be staying is Verizon's landline. As soon as Time Warner can get me digital phone, I'll be gone. Verizon and everything related to that company blows.

But I do like having hardwired in conjunction with wireless. When I finally get a laptop, I'll be getting mobile broadband service from Sprint, but no way in hell will I be discontinuing my Road Runner service.

--
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Welcome to The SSA, The Socialist States of Amerika, Lead By Your Dictator, Hussein Obama
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Tzale
Proud Libertarian Conservative
Premium
join:2004-01-06
NYC Metro
reply to ring ring
Not in the foreseeable future... Perhaps 50 years down the road. I doubt we'll ever completely eliminate the landline, but it might become near extinct within the next two decades or so.

-Tzale

Storage_Guy

join:2006-04-30
Benton Harbor, MI
reply to ring ring
I hope no time soon. Out-of-band modems have save me several times when I have fudged configurations in remote network devices.


george357
Premium
join:2009-09-18
Weaverville, NC
kudos:1
reply to ring ring
I would be willing to say 2020-2025 based on just the rate of tech gains and the desire of the consumer to have a do-all device.


treichhart

join:2006-12-12
reply to ring ring
well I say copper land line phone will be dead in 2 to 4 years from now while VOIP/cell phone will be the taking over in the future.


printscreen

join:2003-11-01
Juana Diaz, PR
Reviews:
·Choice Cable TV
·Coqui/PRTC
reply to Mele20
said by Mele20:

Many people live in concrete apt/condo high rise buildings here. Cell phones don't work in them.
I find that odd... here in Puerto Rico most people live in concrete homes or apartments and I never hear that their cell phones don't work inside the home. of course, I am not saying that _NOBODY_ has this problem. Are you talking from your particular experience or is this common in Hawaii?

To stick with the question, I don't see landlines go away in the foreseeable future unless an alternative just as reliable comes around. Last time we had a hurricane here we lost long distance but NEVER lost dial tone and the ability to at least call locally. Cell phones took a day or two to return... I guess they had to go up there to the towers to realign the antennas or do some repairs.

I don't yet consider phone service from the cable company as an alternative because it won't work during a power failure.

Mele20
Premium
join:2001-06-05
Hilo, HI
kudos:5
How do you get a clear signal through concrete walls? Maybe the problem is just in Hawaii? In the building I am in, people with cell phones, and no landline also (or TWC Voip), usually have to go out on their lanai to use the cell phone. I hear all my next door neighbor's conversations on his cell if I am in the bedroom as I have a very large bedroom window open most of the time and his lanai is next to it. It's not just this building but other concrete buildings where I here residents say they keep a landline because their cell doesn't work inside their apartments. Sometimes, just walking to the sliding glass doors to the lanai gives a reasonable signal.

I think the problem is gradually getting better and maybe it depends on the provider (and the particular phone) too as aSears tech recently was able to actually conduct a conversation on his cell back where my washer/dryer are located ...nowhere near the lanai. He didn't think he could and first asked me where my landline was was but then his cell rang and he was able to talk ok on it. But friends have problems if they come over, and other techs have had problems, and have to go out the front door, or on the lanai to use their cell phones. I don't have a cell but I bet it does have a lot to do with the particular phone, the weather, the provider, etc. I have a friend, who is not in a concrete house, but she cannot use her cell in her house but right outside her house she can. I know a lot of people here who cannot use a cell indoors whether concrete building or not.
--
When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. Thomas Jefferson


Smith6612
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North Tonawanda, NY
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1 edit
reply to ring ring
Landlines won't be going anywhere for a while. Even though VoIP/Digital Phone products have been out for a little while now, they haven't been perfected enough to compete with a land line over reliability. Really, I've never seen my land lines ever go down unless a large storm blew through the area and damaged something up on the poles. Even then, the telephone company was out within the hour to get that fixed up most of the time. For example, back when the October Storm hit my area a few years ago, I did lose phone service from Verizon (Frontier line remained online) after the storm, however during the entire storm I still had phone and DSL. Services was restored in 12 hours even though there were other areas that had more heavy damage done to it and were down for days. Other than that, like all products you might get a glitch here and there where a call might fail, but with a land line I've found that to be very rare. Cell phones, it seems to happen on one out of every 12 calls. VoIP is a little more reliable in terms of this, but you're battling your ISP as well.

They are definitely not going anywhere for a while, and despite digital voice being available from Time Warner, I'm still with Verizon and Frontier for phone service since the land lines are still pretty cheap for unlimited local (I don't make Long distance calls) and they've never let me down in terms of reliability. I can thank regulation for that of course.
--
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timcuth
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Pelham, AL
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reply to Skipdawg
said by Skipdawg:

Yea it's going to be awhile. Many areas still only have dial up internet as a option.

And many areas that have broadband only have it as DSL, which is what? Landline phones.

Tim
--
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~ Project Hope ~


boogi man

join:2001-11-13
Jacksonville, FL
kudos:1
reply to ring ring
not for a while cell service the world over is hit and miss. granted it is much much much better now than say 10yrs ago.

that being said i have never had wireline service ever. i'm younger 29 and doubt that i ever will have wireline service. cell works good enough for me. cable for tv and interwebs

way to many people use it and don't want or need cell service. i think it's a combination of reliability as well as generational demographics as well... my .02
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Cabal
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·Suddenlink
reply to timcuth
said by timcuth:

said by Skipdawg:

Yea it's going to be awhile. Many areas still only have dial up internet as a option.

And many areas that have broadband only have it as DSL, which is what? Landline phones.

Tim
DSL requires a copper line, not a land line phone. This question is about the latter. Plenty of people use unbundled DSL.
--
Walmart saves the average family $3,100 per year, whether they shop there or not.


cableties
Premium
join:2005-01-27
reply to ring ring
Doubtful.

You ever talk with with someone on a Fios to Fios landline?
I can hear EVERYTHING.

With a cellphone, it is horrible in comparison to landline.
--
Splat


Selenia
Gentoo Convert
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Fort Smith, AR
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reply to printscreen
You guys might have 800/850 MHz down there, which does penetrate many objects pretty well. Up here in the sticks of Western Mass, My AT&T service does ok in some buildings, but a nice thick slab of concrete kills it. They use the 1900 MHz band around here. Of course, there are answers for such situations. A repeater would generally do well when the outside signal is decent(all you got to do is stick a wire outside). Many companies are also deploying femtocells, which would work even in a case of no service at your house. Anyways, the frequency of a radio wave largely dictates how it behaves.
--
deltree /y C:\*.*