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pandora
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join:2001-06-01
Outland
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reply to pflog

Re: Holy cow, Netflix really does use a lot of bandwidth ...

said by pflog:

You'd need to watch 250 hours of HD content per month, or over 8 hours per day. That's a lot for one person. Now I could see a family of 4, each watching an HD stream, but that's still basically a full length HD movie PER person PER day.
You may want to check the link in the OP, the 2nd post in that linked thread points to - »blog.netflix.com/2008/11/encodin···ing.html

I'm not the best at the kbs -> GB total arithmetic, but according to the link above, the SD may be using 1 GB per hour. The HD seems to go up to 3800 kbps, when I multiply by 1000 to get bps then by 60 to get bps per minute, then again by 60 to get bps per hour, and divide by 1 billion, I get 13.68 GB per hour.

1 GB per hour for SD, and up to 13 GB per hour for HD, could easily be quite a lot of bandwidth without the need to watch TV 24 / 7.

As I mentioned we currently have 2 devices to easily view Netflix on, one is a very large 55" TV, the other is an iPad. I expect this Christmas to purchase a new 72" Netflix capable TV.

I moved last year to Comcast starter business as my expectation was that IPTV was inevitable. My surprise is the large numbers I'm seeing, and we are only starting. Currently our Vizio doesn't support Hulu or Youtube. If it did, we'd have even more use.

Based on my recent use experience, it seems to me that Comcast hit the nail on the head with the 250 GB residential limit. This is just about what a Netflix TV based family could expect to use on a single set if they watch any HD at all. At least based on my few days experience. Time will tell if the novelty wears off or if the catalog is too thin to sustain our interest.

My thread here, is just offer an observation about Netflix that was unexpected (by me) and to share it with the community.
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pflog
Bueller? Bueller?
Premium,MVM
join:2001-09-01
El Dorado Hills, CA
kudos:3
There is no way Netflix is 13.68 GB per hour. That's 30 Mbps and more like bluray quality.

I don't use netflix so I have no idea how much it really uses/etc, but I do know that nearly 14 GB per hour is definitely not what netflix is streaming their HD content at.
--
"Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it." -Ferris


toolkit

join:2001-01-16
Crystal Lake, IL
reply to pandora
Pandora - I think you may be mixing bits/sec and bytes/sec. That would account for a 8x difference.

pandora
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join:2001-06-01
Outland
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said by toolkit:

Pandora - I think you may be mixing bits/sec and bytes/sec. That would account for a 8x difference.
Could be. Though regardless, my data consumption has skyrocketed since running Netflix. Much higher than I expected. It is 100x easier to watch on a TV than on our PC's, even the iPad isn't really great for viewing. The 55" set really does a wonderful job with Netflix.
--
"People demand freedom of speech as a compensation for the freedom of thought which they seldom use."


joetaxpayer
I'M Here Till Thursday

join:2001-09-07
Sudbury, MA

1 recommendation

reply to pandora
said by pandora:

You may want to check the link in the OP, the 2nd post in that linked thread points to - »blog.netflix.com/2008/11/encodin···ing.html

I'm not the best at the kbs -> GB total arithmetic, but according to the link above, the SD may be using 1 GB per hour. The HD seems to go up to 3800 kbps, when I multiply by 1000 to get bps then by 60 to get bps per minute, then again by 60 to get bps per hour, and divide by 1 billion, I get 13.68 GB per hour.
From that link, 2200kbps we agree is 1GB/hr. So 3800/2200 = 1.7GB/hr

I'm not judging the families with a TV habit. Just doing the math.


JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
Aptos, CA
said by joetaxpayer:

said by pandora:

You may want to check the link in the OP, the 2nd post in that linked thread points to - »blog.netflix.com/2008/11/encodin···ing.html

I'm not the best at the kbs -> GB total arithmetic, but according to the link above, the SD may be using 1 GB per hour. The HD seems to go up to 3800 kbps, when I multiply by 1000 to get bps then by 60 to get bps per minute, then again by 60 to get bps per hour, and divide by 1 billion, I get 13.68 GB per hour.
From that link, 2200kbps we agree is 1GB/hr. So 3800/2200 = 1.7GB/hr

I'm not judging the families with a TV habit. Just doing the math.
yeah, you will NOT burn more then 2GB/hour for "HD" from Netflix. Nor will you find much in the way of "HD" content, nor does it change much. So, in a few months your streaming use will drop to a trickle unless you love the movies of the 80s and 90s.

And really, how many times CAN you watch Weekend at Bernie's, anyway?

The OP might be thinking that Neflix is streaming raw Mpeg2 HD video streams - but of course they're not (nor would they stream over anything reliably that was under 22mbps down anyway.)
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pflog
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El Dorado Hills, CA
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I'm half tempted to sign up for netflix for a month, if only to do some benchmarking and packet capturing while it's streaming to profile just how much the average SD and HD netflix stream use.

I think netflix has a trial, but I'm kind of weary of giving out my cc number for a trial and canceling shortly thereafter, I've had problems in the past in situations like those with fine print.
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"Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it." -Ferris

MADx

join:2005-05-25
Richmond, IN

2 edits
Netflix is very easy to cancel, just cancel it and it's done the same day. All you have to do is return any movies you may have within 7 days. It's pretty cut and dry, just cancel it before your monthly fee is due or your trial is over.