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JAAulde
Web Developer
Premium,MVM
join:2001-05-09
Williamsport, MD
kudos:3

2 edits

Two story deck w/ full roof protection for lower story?

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Back of House (sorry for foreground distraction)
Hi everyone,

My house has a back porch which is roughly 13'x15' (block foundation, poured concrete floor) and has a roof. The roof is a ver shallow pitch, almost to the point of being flat. The posts, rails, and roof are very old (I am guessing at least 20-30 years) and the roof is rotting out and falling through in spots. I am ready to completely remove it and replace it.

Odd thing, though, there is an exterior door on the second floor of the house which opens out to the existing porch roof. From the looks of some of the markings on the brick above the roof, this was originally (house was built in 1940) a two story porch. In rebuilding, I want to go ahead and add the second story deck back on.

What I don't want to do is lose the full roof protection on the lower story to which I have grown accustomed. I love that my grill is under roof along with its cover, and that my kids can just kick their shoes off on the back porch and leave them. Decks generally have space between each deck board to allow water and such to run through, and that will greatly detract from the coverage I currently enjoy.

So I want to build this in such a way that there is a roof with roofing materials over the lower story, and then a deck built just above that roof. My father built houses for 30 years and I consulted him about this, and he said he has seen things of this nature done. However, my father has been out of the business a long time and, by his own admission, is often out of date with some of the more modern products and methods available to make life easier.

Thus, I come to you fine folks and ask if you know of any methods for building a second story deck, while providing full roof coverage to the lower story.

Thanks very much,
Jim

Edit: replaced attached photo with larger size
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dandeman
Premium,MVM
join:2001-12-05
Chapel Hill, NC
Reviews:
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3 edits
Have seen it done on This Old House where the roof covering is a rubber membrane material and the decking material rests on top of the membrane.. Sounds like an area you need to bone up on and perhaps run by the AHJ in your area to make sure the method to be used is acceptable.

One other observation, under current building codes, I sure with the 2nd floor opening, you would need railings upper level. Should be no surprise..

One other observation, the close proximity of the service entrance wiring to the upper deck area may well be an issue also.. A bit hard to see in the pic, but looks like it might be an easy fix to just have the power company move the overhead drop wiring attachment point on the house away from the deck.. I looks like the service entrance riser is located beyond reach from the deck and maybe OK.

dick white
Premium
join:2000-03-24
Annandale, VA
reply to JAAulde
It was a common design "feature" in the '30s/'40s in the Balto-Wash. area (and maybe elsewhere too, I just never lived anywhere else) for a screened porch on the first level to have a walk-out flat roof from the second level, often the master bedroom. The flat roof / upper "deck" was usually built up of layers of roofing felt and hot tar with a topping of gravel or granulated asphalt roll roofing. There was a railing around the edge. I don't know what the attraction was with the upper level, maybe I'll ask my mother tomorrow what her parents did out there in the house she grew up in.

In the house I lived in with one like that, the roof needed to be redone, as with yours. Instead, I bricked up the lower portion of the door and put in a window. Then I put a low-pitched shed roof over the old roof structure (IMHO flat roofs are latent problems looking for a time and place to happen...), and enclosed the screen porch. I put in huge Andersen sliders all the way around where the screening was so the open feeling of the room was still there and you could open half of the total area on a nice day as if it were still a screen porch while still being able to close it in when desired. I fully finished the now-sunroom (there never was any access to the ground from the porch) and enjoyed many hours out there.

You may not want to go that far with your "grillin' room," but if you are going to rip the rotted roof off anyway, you might consider doing something different with the space. If you really want to use the roof as an upper deck, you would use a membrane roofing material as dandeman suggests and then set floating square wood deck panels on pads at the corners of each panel. The current issue (I think, son#1 took off with it ) of Fine Homebuilding has an article about how this is done.

cheers
dw


Sweet Witch
Be the flame, not the moth.
Premium,MVM
join:2003-07-15
Gallifrey
reply to JAAulde
Can you build a barely slanted roof over the first floor then put the upper porch on top? With a skirt board around the bottom of the upper porch it would look neater. Even if you just unroll an awning (or nail it up) under the upper floor, it would drain the water away to a gutter.

Or you could use some kind of flooring on the upper deck that would double as the lower roof - something with grooves in it though to carry away the water.
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sdgthy

@optonline.net

1 recommendation

reply to JAAulde
I was looking at doing something much the same not too long ago.

One way, but kinda pricey is aluminum decking such as this.

Another method was to lay down plywood and cover it with a one piece EPDM membrane to waterproof it. And then install a floating deck over the membrane.


macsierra8
Baby Newfoundland
Premium
join:2003-11-30
Minden, NV

1 recommendation

reply to JAAulde
I just completed one. The rubber membrane is not so bad to do. I had a roofer that did a bunch of these at Lake Tahoe do this one. We put EverGrain Composite decking over it and it's working out quite well.




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macsierra8
Baby Newfoundland
Premium
join:2003-11-30
Minden, NV

1 recommendation

reply to JAAulde
You can also use DryJoist. I looked into it but in a slow year labor prices were way down so that's the way I went.

»www.wahoodecks.com/dryjoist/howitworks.php

Here's a bit more detail in picts. Involves sloping the under deck for drainage and then tapering the deck runners up for a flat deck surface.





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JAAulde
Web Developer
Premium,MVM
join:2001-05-09
Williamsport, MD
kudos:3

1 edit
reply to JAAulde
Thanks everyone, some good thoughts and ideas! macsierra8 See Profile those pics are very helpful. I have seen the ole' tapered-deck-runner trick done for some different applications, and never thought of it for this. I think that's what I'll do, along with the rubber membrane.

However, that dry-joist looks amazing, and I would like to price it out too!

Thanks again everyone!

Jim
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JAAulde
Web Developer
Premium,MVM
join:2001-05-09
Williamsport, MD
kudos:3
reply to JAAulde

Re: Two story deck w/ full roof protection for lower story?

Wow, I priced out the Dry Joist product from Wahoo Decks. For my (roughly) 13x13 deck it would cost me around $2500 JUST FOR THE aluminum joist. This is before shipping and taxes, and I'd still need some lumber, rails, gutter, etc. I guess I'll be doing this the old fashioned way.
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ElminsterOld

join:2009-03-04
reply to JAAulde
Thanks for the update on the dryjoist quote. Good info!


JAAulde
Web Developer
Premium,MVM
join:2001-05-09
Williamsport, MD
kudos:3
said by ElminsterOld:

Thanks for the update on the dryjoist quote. Good info!
No problem. To be specific, I was told on the phone that Dry joist is usually quoted at about $14.50/sqft and Dry Joist EZ is quoted around $9.50/sqft. This is only for the Dry Joist--no fasteners, etc and before taxes, shipping, and so on.

If I were to do it with Dry Joist EZ the cost for the product would be around $1500. But that only spans 6 feet (as opposed to 8) so I'd need to have more framing in place.
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