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This is a sub-selection from This is actually really interesting


FFH
Premium
join:2002-03-03
Tavistock NJ
kudos:5
reply to RockCake

Re: This is actually really interesting

said by RockCake:

said by Vamp9190:

*Sigh*
I always loved Finland. Reindeer, cross-country skiing, fjords, hot blondes in snowshoes, all that.
I wonder how much a flat in Helsinki costs....
Hot tubs, don't forget hot tubs!
And don't forget higher suicide rates due to all those dark winter days.
--
Are you happy with your rep in Washington, DC?

patcat88

join:2002-04-05
Jamaica, NY
kudos:1

said by FFH:

And don't forget higher suicide rates due to all those dark winter days.
I love the cold winter. Everything is dead and abiotic. Darkness is good on my eyes too.


birdfeedr
Premium,MVM
join:2001-08-11
Warwick, RI
kudos:9
reply to FFH

said by FFH:

And don't forget higher suicide rates due to all those dark winter days.
Not sure what makes Greenland different from Finland. Summer seems to be the suicide peak there (spike, actually). »neurocritic.blogspot.com/2009/05···est.html

One comment in that link says it could be different, since suicide rates before and after the 70s is more significant than seasonal variations. Something to do with mandatory settlements for Inuits.

From »herkules.oulu.fi/isbn9514256042/html/ (emphasis added)
quote:
The seasonal variation of suicides is a well-documented phenomenon in the medical literature. In the late 1880s, Durkheim (1970) found that the incidence of suicide was at its highest during spring or early summer and at its lowest during winter. This finding has been confirmed in numerous subsequent studies both from Northern (see for example, Kevan 1980, Massing & Angermeyer 1985, Chew & McCleary 1995, Altamura et al. 1999) and Southern Hemisphere countries (see, for example, Parker & Walter 1982, Flisher et al. 1997).
Modern studies are looking into the seasonal variation of suicides and homicides. The Finnish website linked above goes into very academic detail. The abstract on the first page should be sufficient reading for most.


tshirt
Premium,MVM
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:4
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to FFH

said by FFH:

said by RockCake:

said by Vamp9190:

*Sigh*
I always loved Finland. Reindeer, cross-country skiing, fjords, hot blondes in snowshoes, all that.
I wonder how much a flat in Helsinki costs....
Hot tubs, don't forget hot tubs!
And don't forget higher suicide rates due to all those dark winter days.
AND really don't forget the 49% tax burden!
Of course with you working 2 or more jobs to pay for the 350 Sq ft studio apt. and putting a decent meal on the table every week or 2, you'll hardly have time for the internet stuff, IF you can afford the "reasonable price" (this is only right of access, not free) after you pay your heating bill.

amigo_boy

join:2005-07-22

2 edits

1 recommendation

said by tshirt:

AND really don't forget the 49% tax burden!
My source says the average real tax in Finland is 46%. And, they have an extremely low level of wealth disparity compared to the US, whose real tax averages 40%.

The Gini-index part is interesting. The US has more in common with Mexico and China in terms of wealth disparity, which are both near 45. Canada is with all the other WASPie nations like Finland, Belgium, Germany.

And just a 6% real tax difference? Seems like we're getting shortchanged.


NeelyCam

@intel.com

Yep.

USA is only better for high-income individuals; for anyone with average-or-below, nordic socialist nations are a far better choice.



tshirt
Premium,MVM
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:4
reply to amigo_boy

The EU counsel puts Finland at TOTAL taxation 48.8% of GDP, and the comparitive measure for the US around 29.6 (2009 numbers for both) A long way apart.
However if you think you'll be better off there, feel free to move.


amigo_boy

join:2005-07-22

1 recommendation

said by tshirt:

The EU counsel puts Finland at TOTAL taxation 48.8% of GDP, and the comparitive measure for the US around 29.6 (2009 numbers for both) A long way apart.
I thought you were talking about what an individual would pay.

I think everyone knows we pay a lot more than 29.6% tax when income, sales, property and sin taxes are added together. It's only by adding corporate and capital gains taxes (with all the loopholes) that it goes back down to 29.6%.


M A R S
Premium
join:2001-06-15
Long Island
kudos:1

said by amigo_boy:

said by tshirt:

The EU counsel puts Finland at TOTAL taxation 48.8% of GDP, and the comparitive measure for the US around 29.6 (2009 numbers for both) A long way apart.
I thought you were talking about what an individual would pay.

I think everyone knows we pay a lot more than 29.6% tax when income, sales, property and sin taxes are added together. It's only by adding corporate and capital gains taxes (with all the loopholes) that it goes back down to 29.6%.
interesting, does any one have a link to what some like me on Long Island pays? I bet in the end its much more than 29.6%
--
Democrats Have Guns Too..

amigo_boy

join:2005-07-22

said by M A R S:

does any one have a link to what some like me on Long Island pays? I bet in the end its much more than 29.6%
I haven't seen anything broken down by state.

It's difficult to measure, and especially apply cross-culturally. For example, earlier in this thread "pnh" pointed out how ISPs pay a tax to cities for their use of easements and rights of way. That tax is passed on to the ISPs' customers.

So, if a country like Finland doesn't do that (instead paying for the administration of easements from the general fund), their tax rate looks higher than ours.

Same with healthcare. You pay for your private insurance premiums through a paycheck deduction (and co-pay at time of visit, and deductables each year). If a country like Finland has single-payer healthcare insurance coming out of the general fund, you can't really compare their total (real) tax rate without considering what we pay which isn't a precisely a tax.

It's not as clear as it might seem.


NeelyCam

@comcast.net
reply to tshirt

Where did I say I think I would be better off?
Reading comprehension...?