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This is a sub-selection from This is actually really interesting

amigo_boy

join:2005-07-22

1 recommendation

reply to tshirt

Re: This is actually really interesting

said by tshirt:

The EU counsel puts Finland at TOTAL taxation 48.8% of GDP, and the comparitive measure for the US around 29.6 (2009 numbers for both) A long way apart.
I thought you were talking about what an individual would pay.

I think everyone knows we pay a lot more than 29.6% tax when income, sales, property and sin taxes are added together. It's only by adding corporate and capital gains taxes (with all the loopholes) that it goes back down to 29.6%.


M A R S
Premium
join:2001-06-15
Long Island
kudos:1

said by amigo_boy:

said by tshirt:

The EU counsel puts Finland at TOTAL taxation 48.8% of GDP, and the comparitive measure for the US around 29.6 (2009 numbers for both) A long way apart.
I thought you were talking about what an individual would pay.

I think everyone knows we pay a lot more than 29.6% tax when income, sales, property and sin taxes are added together. It's only by adding corporate and capital gains taxes (with all the loopholes) that it goes back down to 29.6%.
interesting, does any one have a link to what some like me on Long Island pays? I bet in the end its much more than 29.6%
--
Democrats Have Guns Too..

amigo_boy

join:2005-07-22

said by M A R S:

does any one have a link to what some like me on Long Island pays? I bet in the end its much more than 29.6%
I haven't seen anything broken down by state.

It's difficult to measure, and especially apply cross-culturally. For example, earlier in this thread "pnh" pointed out how ISPs pay a tax to cities for their use of easements and rights of way. That tax is passed on to the ISPs' customers.

So, if a country like Finland doesn't do that (instead paying for the administration of easements from the general fund), their tax rate looks higher than ours.

Same with healthcare. You pay for your private insurance premiums through a paycheck deduction (and co-pay at time of visit, and deductables each year). If a country like Finland has single-payer healthcare insurance coming out of the general fund, you can't really compare their total (real) tax rate without considering what we pay which isn't a precisely a tax.

It's not as clear as it might seem.