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espaeth
Digital Plumber
Premium,MVM
join:2001-04-21
Minneapolis, MN
kudos:2

1 edit

Netflix is a different model

Internet delivered content has limitations on the number of simultaneous viewers that can be served, so while Netflix style delivery works good for serving up things like Dexter Season 1 episodes to a couple million folks who want to watch on their own time, it doesn't make sense (technically or financially) for things like live broadcasts of American Idol.

Video delivery isn't going to go 100% Internet distribution. There are cases that make clear sense for IP-based delivery, but there are a large number of cases for which IP delivery would represent a massive increase to the cost of delivery -- for those cases traditional broadcast methods will still continue to exist.

Thatgeekinit

join:2002-05-01
Washington, DC
I gave up cable tv and kept internet-only back in may. I have not lacked for things to watch on Netflix, Youtube or Hulu and dozens of other video sites plus DVD rentals.

I pay $59.95 for a premium cable modem speed tier (12/2 I think, who knows they change it so often and don't disclose well) and $18 for Netflix. That is opposed to $129 for my cable mode + cable tv bill.

Now I can afford alcohol and snacks to go with my tv watching.

--
FaceKhanCitizen Khan dot com


espaeth
Digital Plumber
Premium,MVM
join:2001-04-21
Minneapolis, MN
kudos:2
It all depends on what you want to get out of your TV viewing. While it clearly doesn't apply to you (based on your described services), the sports broadcasting market is a massive entity that is unable to be adequately served by Internet distribution. The numbers simply don't work for the quantity of simultaneous realtime viewers and the bitrate required for HD video delivery.

Kearnstd
Space Elf
Premium
join:2002-01-22
Mullica Hill, NJ
kudos:1
reply to espaeth
sports also looses another thing with internet delivery. absolute control of the blackout restriction. with TV the only method one could use is a big old C-Band dish(and odds are the sports people would sue people for that claiming its illegal).
--
[65 Arcanist]Filan(High Elf) Zone: Broadband Reports


espaeth
Digital Plumber
Premium,MVM
join:2001-04-21
Minneapolis, MN
kudos:2
said by Kearnstd:

sports also looses another thing with internet delivery.
They actually work that out in the ESPN Live engine that drives mlb.tv / NHL GameCenter Live by usiing geoIP database information. Even for online access you get blocked out based on where you are at the time. For example, when I traveled to Nashville I was able to watch a Minnesota Wild game that would normally be blocked out when accessing the site from home, but I couldn't watch a Nashville Predators game taking place the same night.

The problem is that even though the NeuLion codec brought some reasonable improvements to quality that make it quite watchable on an 11" netbook screen, it looks absolutely horrific if hooked up to a 55" HDTV.

Ulmo

join:2005-09-22
Aptos, CA
reply to espaeth
Bandwidth for P2P broadcast will lag P2MP broadcast, but it will be substantial enough to serve the prior standard's content fully, and will always catch up to the next wave's amount of content soon enough.

Furthermore, full-on most-current-standard high-count mass-broadcast events are far and few inbetween, like Assball, Football, BasketBall, and Screaming Bitches I mean Slumarican Idol Worship. The rest would easily fit, even at most current standard, in current bandwidth provisions, in P2P models.

Glossary:

P2P: Point to Point. Referring to e.g., Netflix to User using unicast IP. Not referring to P2P filesharing.

P2MP: Point to MultiPoint. Referring to traditional broadcast, like OTA TV. (The kind with an antenna.) Also used for Satellite and Cable like stuff, relative to its multipointiness.

prior standard, current standard, next wave: quality of reproduction (dimensions and detail (resolution, color depth, frequency, etc.)) -- 3D at 1,000,000 pixels by 1,000,000 pixels by 1,000,000 pixels at 480Hz with 64 bit color depth and different points of view takes more bandwidth than 1920x1080p60Hz std using MPEG4/AVC/VC1, and there are multiple steps between those two extremes, neither of which we've even gotten to yet in most places).

Assball: ASSociation footBALL.

Football: Football (USA).

Basketball: Criminals stealing a ball and running around like monkeys.

Slumarican Idol Worship: "American Idol"

Ulmo

join:2005-09-22
Aptos, CA
reply to espaeth
said by espaeth:

It all depends on what you want to get out of your TV viewing. While it clearly doesn't apply to you (based on your described services), the sports broadcasting market is a massive entity that is unable to be adequately served by Internet distribution. The numbers simply don't work for the quantity of simultaneous realtime viewers and the bitrate required for HD video delivery.
Which brings up the point: we only need about one satellite for the entire continent to cover all of that mass-broadcast sports broadcasting junk. That's because there's a finite number of mass-broadcast events on at any given moment. The amount of bandwidth in the non-point-to-point arena that needs to be dedicated to this niche market is therefore not odious, and can be easily absorbed into greater systems that are point-to-point centric. An antenna at every neighborhood cable closet can grab that small amount of broadcast spew with a relatively cheap box (only has to get a limited amount of content) and insert it on demand to the local last leg with ease. It can use multicast at that level, too (or whatever IPv6 calls it, actually).

Yes, it's a different beast, but it doesn't take a lot of bandwidth to hear horns blaring constantly like with AssBall. It's only one friggin channel. It can be special-cased, and not hold back any other point to point individualized content.