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Drift_91

join:2009-02-11
Perth, ON
Reviews:
·NCF

Phoneline Quality Regulation in Canada?

I've read in so many places that phone companies are only required to provide "voice" quality from their phone lines, that is they're only required to maintain the lines to the point that you can "talk" but are not required to fix your phone line if you can't use your dialup modem. I read in one article that they ARE required to maintain reasonable dialup connectivity on their lines. All these articles didn't specify what countries they applied to, so I'm guessing they were aimed at an all american audience.

What I want to know is if I can take legal action against Bell for providing inadequate line quality for me to use my dialup properly. My ISP keeps blaming my phone line every time I ask them to fix their modems. I want to make sure the phone line is sudo-reliable so I can prove it's their modems and not Bell's lines. Switching ISPs is not an option because they are the only ISP in my local calling area that provides truly "unlimited" access.



tschmidt
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-12
Milford, NH
kudos:9
Reviews:
·G4 Communications
·Fairpoint Commun..
·Hollis Hosting

I assume Canadian regulations are similar to those in the US. Regulations specify voice quality. Modems take advantage of the fact that in most cases loop quality is much higher then required allowing to modem to operate faster then if worst case line conditions are assumed.

1) How is voice quality? Any noise on line, especially when phone is first picked up? What about crosstalk, other voices? If voice quality is not up to snuff have the phone company repair the line.

2) I doubt the ISP modem is at fault. Assuming your ISP supports V.90/92 ISP side is directly terminated to T-1 or other digital service. V.90/92 requires that one and only one digital to analog conversion exist between ISP and customer. That normally occurs at the central office serving the customer.

Most likely your phone company is using some form of pair-gain equipment to multiplex multiple voice customers over a single circuit. This can significantly degrade modem speed.

I've posted more info on my site if you are interested in the gory details.
»www.tschmidt.com/writings/POTS_M···ents.htm

/tom


Drift_91

join:2009-02-11
Perth, ON
Reviews:
·NCF

I'll check out that link in a minute.

There is some audible noise, mostly crackling after it rains. There's a very hard to hear hiss during dry weather no mater how windy it is (typically need to place my ear right next to the speakerphone).

We're not the only one's getting the audible symptoms, the first thing I thought was they must be sending several signals over one analog line using different frequencies (like DSL uses a different frequency) because digital lines are relatively immune to noise.

I believe it is the ISPs modems (or authorization servers, etc.), I've tried dialing from another location and I've tried using a freenet all the way in Los Angeles. At one point we switched to another ISP who falsely advertised their service as "unlimited" and this ISP would still let me dial in and use the internet when it wasn't supposed to.

It stays connected for hours, but the instant I start a download or load a large webpage it disconnects.


Drift_91

join:2009-02-11
Perth, ON
Reviews:
·NCF

OK, I read your article. I'm currently connected at 44.0Kbps so I'm obviously in V.90/V.92, I believe I'm in V.92 but I'm not sure.

I still maintain connection speeds in the 40s even with the "wet line" noise, which is easily heard but only slightly impedes the ability to understand the other person's words.

I've been wondering for a while if there's any way I can test the line myself? for example dialing to a modem dedicated to such purpose.



tschmidt
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-12
Milford, NH
kudos:9
Reviews:
·G4 Communications
·Fairpoint Commun..
·Hollis Hosting

said by Drift_91:

I've been wondering for a while if there's any way I can test the line myself? for example dialing to a modem dedicated to such purpose.
Not really.

You said this ISP was the only one with local point of presence (POP). If you have an account with another dialup ISP you could give that a try even though it is a toll call.

Back when I had dialup my ISP recommended using modem with chips made by the same vendor as ISP modem. Theory being under adverse conditions that would likely result in best connection. Not sure how useful that recommendation was even back then. V.90/92 has been around for a long time and most are soft modems now a days, using the main PC CPU for most of the heavy lifting.

/tom