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« 30 minutes/monthhmm »
This is a sub-selection from Profit in the parks

k1ll3rdr4g0n

join:2005-03-19
Homer Glen, IL
reply to Bobcat79

Re: Profit in the parks

said by Bobcat79:

There are hot dog / soda carts in the parks. I assume the vendors are there to make a profit. We pay money to get a Coke; why should WiFi be any different?
I think you missed the point.
Those hotdog sellers have to pay for inventory. To provide wifi access, all an ISP has to do is setup some APs and run an internet connection to them. After that, the service runs itself. You only need to send people out for maintenance. ISP's do NOT pay per amount of data, they pay for the speed of data (assuming they don't have a backbone of some kind). Which I'm sure when the smoke clears, they will have some sort of cap for that .99c simply because they want to continue the illusion that they pay per byte.
So, some of the costs would be:
+ Equipment (one time)
+ Maintenance
+ Cost of the speed of bandwidth/month
Which, to an ISP the last item is pennies compared to the amount of profit they can get from this deal.


aztecnology
O Rly?
Premium
join:2003-02-12
Murrieta, CA

said by k1ll3rdr4g0n:

said by Bobcat79:

There are hot dog / soda carts in the parks. I assume the vendors are there to make a profit. We pay money to get a Coke; why should WiFi be any different?
I think you missed the point.
Those hotdog sellers have to pay for inventory.
lolwht...?
--
.:|:. This link for rent...!

Bobcat79
Premium
join:2001-02-04
reply to k1ll3rdr4g0n

Neither hot dogs nor bandwidth is free.


talz13

join:2006-03-15
Avon, OH
reply to k1ll3rdr4g0n

said by k1ll3rdr4g0n:

ISP's do NOT pay per amount of data, they pay for the speed of data (assuming they don't have a backbone of some kind).
I thought they only paid for the amount of data, not necessarily the speed.


Simba7
I Void Warranties

join:2003-03-24
Billings, MT

2 edits
reply to Bobcat79

said by Bobcat79:

Neither hot dogs nor bandwidth is free.
I'm sure the ISP's can squeeze at least 1Mbps from their Tb/sec backbone.

..not to mention most ISPs get a discount for getting a huge pipe. What frustrates me is some charge by the byte when they're getting charged by the speed.


WHT

join:2010-03-26
Rosston, TX
kudos:5
reply to Bobcat79

said by Bobcat79:

Neither hot dogs nor bandwidth is free.
Nice play on "Animals and proles are free." Thumbs up.

k1ll3rdr4g0n

join:2005-03-19
Homer Glen, IL
reply to Bobcat79

said by Bobcat79:

Neither hot dogs nor bandwidth is free.
Did I say it was? No.
Please reread my post.


tubbynet
reminds me of the danse russe
Premium,MVM
join:2008-01-16
Chandler, AZ
kudos:1
reply to Simba7

said by Simba7:

I'm sure the ISP's can squeeze at least 1Mbps from their Tb/sec backbone.
thats quite a bit of a stretch -- considering that if a transit backbone is using something like packet over sonet links, technology only exists for n*oc768 (~40gbps). 40gbe and 100gbe are still in the pipeline and have not been standardized yet.

q.
--
"...if I in my north room dance naked, grotesquely before my mirror waving my shirt round my head and singing softly to myself..."


tubbynet
reminds me of the danse russe
Premium,MVM
join:2008-01-16
Chandler, AZ
kudos:1
reply to k1ll3rdr4g0n

said by k1ll3rdr4g0n:

ISP's do NOT pay per amount of data, they pay for the speed of data (assuming they don't have a backbone of some kind)
if an isp has a backbone -- transit is free, but the peering is not. the transit path simply allows them to carry data where cheap peering is available (or to provide "in house transit" to different nap's in the country).
at the end of the day -- if the destination resides out of the control of the isp's network, then traffic will have to be handed off to another carrier -- sometimes at a cost. depending on the size of the carrier, traffic agreements, load sharing, etc, the peering may be "free" since the two peers will come to an agreement that traffic will be roughly equal and differences split at the end of the quarter/half/year, etc (generally true for tier-1 access). however, if the isp is a residential access network that is not an old lec (i.e. your mso's) and they don't have a significant userbase from which to draw destination traffic from -- they will probably end up paying for throughput in one way or another (something like 95th percentile or so).

q.
--
"...if I in my north room dance naked, grotesquely before my mirror waving my shirt round my head and singing softly to myself..."


Simba7
I Void Warranties

join:2003-03-24
Billings, MT
reply to tubbynet

said by tubbynet:

thats quite a bit of a stretch -- considering that if a transit backbone is using something like packet over sonet links, technology only exists for n*oc768 (~40gbps). 40gbe and 100gbe are still in the pipeline and have not been standardized yet.
I meant multiple redundant backbones. Some of the larger ISP's (or backbone providers) usually have several.

..and that's 40GbE on a single link. We all know that a fiber bundle usually has several tens/hundreds of them.

Also, 40GbE and 100GbE are official. »en.wikipedia.org/wiki/100_Gigabit_Ethernet
--
Bresnan 18M/1M
MyWS[E5200@3.75GHz,4GB RAM,2x1TB HDDs,Win7]
WifeWS[A64@2GHz,2GB RAM,120GB HDD,Win7]
Router[2xP3@1GHz,512MB RAM,18GB HDD,SMC 8432BTA,2xDigital DE504,Compaq NC3131,Intel Pro/1000MT,IBM Gigabit Ethernet-SX,Allied Telesyn AT2560FX,Gentoo Linux]


tubbynet
reminds me of the danse russe
Premium,MVM
join:2008-01-16
Chandler, AZ
kudos:1

said by Simba7:

..and that's 40GbE on a single link. We all know that a fiber bundle usually has several tens/hundreds of them.
but the fiber bundle may or may not carry all of the same isp's transit traffic. the issue with having several hundred strands per bundle, is the optics, linecards, chassis, and management to be able to handle all of said terminations. at the current packet over sonet max rate -- thats still a bundle of 25 sets of strands. not saying it doesn't happen -- but thats quite a stretch to say that it *always* happens.

Also, 40GbE and 100GbE are official. »en.wikipedia.org/wiki/100_Gigabit_Ethernet
yes -- as of 17 june 2010. show me a manufacturer that has done more than demo their phy and show me a kit maker that has 40gbe or 100gbe running currently in a box for sale.

q.
--
"...if I in my north room dance naked, grotesquely before my mirror waving my shirt round my head and singing softly to myself..."