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Karl Bode
News Guy
join:2000-03-02
kudos:39

Hardwood transition to threshold for patio door

Click for full size
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So I asked some folks about this a few months ago, and I've yet to start laying 5/8" bamboo downstairs yet. About to get started, and the only part I'm confused about is the transition from the 5/8th inch bamboo to the transition outside.

I have a double glass entry heading outside to a patio, though as the photo shows, only one side opens as a door -- inwards. The threshold so far is little more than a track for a sliding screen door, and a pink, plastic threshold that the door rests directly above when closed.

On the left side, I'm thinking I just leave the expansion gap, and cover it with quarter round bamboo molding. Is that fine?

On the right side, as someone suggested, I'm thinking I'd replace that worn pink plastic strip with something like this:

»www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1vZ1···Id=10053

But I have a few questions with that. The metal faces outside, and it looks like it's too wide and will run across the screen track.

I also don't understand how I'd cover the expansion gap between the bamboo and the oak portion of the threshold -- without having to add an even higher transition piece forcing me to cut the door even shorter....

Ideas? Other options?


Jtmo
Premium
join:2001-05-20
Novato, CA

I just went right up to the door with my wood, cut to fit.



Karl Bode
News Guy
join:2000-03-02
kudos:39

You mean just running it right flush with the pink plastic strip then cutting the door shorter to clear the bamboo (the bamboo sits slightly higher than the pink strip does)?

Thing is I wouldn't mind replacing the strip and putting in a real, more weatherproof threshold there.



Jtmo
Premium
join:2001-05-20
Novato, CA
reply to Karl Bode

You have no city listed, but if you are in a weather variable area you have different issues than me.
My weather is mild, I have no threshold at all, not really needed.
I would get a nice wood threshold, or just make one out of wood and get rid of that cheap looking pink thing.

I have no threshold at all.



Jtmo
Premium
join:2001-05-20
Novato, CA
reply to Karl Bode

Click for full size
Kempas floor threshold
My threshold


Karl Bode
News Guy
join:2000-03-02
kudos:39

New York State. Definitely going to need something with some weatherproofing, and with humid summers probably going to need that expansion gap up against the door....



Jtmo
Premium
join:2001-05-20
Novato, CA
reply to Karl Bode

Bamboo is very moisture tolerant.
Maybe rip a strip (which could be easily replaced some day), and add silicone between the door and floor?


robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
reply to Karl Bode

The problem is that type of door is not make to be cut shorter. The door and pane next to it are part of a unit. There is no ready made threshold that is going to work out of the store. The proper thing to do would be to remove the door / window unit and raise it however much the bottom of the door needs to raise. I have never torn apart a door like that but I don't think it is going to be easy to just remove the plastic piece and install a higher threshold. I'm definitely not saying that it can't be done. I'm sure that someone with experience and a good selection of tools could do something with it. For others, I think it would be easier to reinstall the entire unit.



Jtmo
Premium
join:2001-05-20
Novato, CA
reply to Karl Bode

»www.lowes.com/pd_2025-28573-608B···Moulding

Here is a Bamboo threshold from Lowe's.

But, I know you are trying to avoid cutting the door more which is why you can at least try a strip of silicone with a very thin strip laid on top to finish it off?

I am just fortunate to not have to worry about my flooring moving a half inch due to weather.

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1

If I remember correctly from the earlier post, the door has to be cut or raised due to the thickness of the new floor.



Karl Bode
News Guy
join:2000-03-02
kudos:39

said by robbin:

If I remember correctly from the earlier post, the door has to be cut or raised due to the thickness of the new floor.
Yep. Unless I pull out the whole door (something I'd like to avoid if at all possible), the door has to be cut a little, as the bamboo lying on the plywood winds up being slightly higher than the pink plastic piece you see there...


Karl Bode
News Guy
join:2000-03-02
kudos:39
reply to Jtmo

said by Jtmo:

»www.lowes.com/pd_2025-28573-608B···Moulding

Here is a Bamboo threshold from Lowe's.

But, I know you are trying to avoid cutting the door more which is why you can at least try a strip of silicone with a very thin strip laid on top to finish it off?

I am just fortunate to not have to worry about my flooring moving a half inch due to weather.
Interesting. I guess I could install this after the gap, have the door rest on that piece, then cut the door to fit.

Is bamboo really what I want between me and a NY winter though? Will it be ok with some clear sealant around all edges?


Jtmo
Premium
join:2001-05-20
Novato, CA

Bamboo is one wood that is used in kitchens where there is water. It is a plant rather than wood, and softer than hardwood.


robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1

said by Jtmo:

It is a plant rather than wood
I'm pretty sure that wood comes from a plant. Perhaps you meant to say it is a grass rather than a tree? In any case, I'm not sure about it being exposed to weather as a threshold. I doubt it would hold up.


Msradell
P.E.
Premium
join:2008-12-25
Louisville, KY
reply to robbin

said by robbin:

The problem is that type of door is not make to be cut shorter. The door and pane next to it are part of a unit. There is no ready made threshold that is going to work out of the store. The proper thing to do would be to remove the door / window unit and raise it however much the bottom of the door needs to raise.
This is definitely the right way to do this. Any other way will cause problems down the road. It goes back to the old saying "pay me now or pay me later". You might just as well fix it now and do it right the first time instead of having to do it again.


Karl Bode
News Guy
join:2000-03-02
kudos:39

1 edit
reply to robbin

said by robbin:

said by Jtmo:

It is a plant rather than wood
I'm pretty sure that wood comes from a plant. Perhaps you meant to say it is a grass rather than a tree? In any case, I'm not sure about it being exposed to weather as a threshold. I doubt it would hold up.
It would probably hold up for a year or two, then I might have to replace it. What would be ideal is a threshold piece like the one above made out of metal or something more weather resistant.

The right swinging door really can be cut without it being very noticeable, as we're honestly probably talking about a few millimeters to clear the bamboo....if I can find a threshold that's not very tall....


dolphins
Clean Up Our Oceans
Premium
join:2001-08-22
Westville, NJ
kudos:7
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to Karl Bode

You're going to make your own custom exterior threshold.

Get yourself some light gauge aluminum angle trim and an unfinished threshold transition. Unfinished is not beveled. You don't want a bevel on the outer edge where you attach the aluminum angle. You may not be able to find an unfinished bamboo transition but you should be able to get it in oak. If worse comes to worst you can always make one out of 1" x 2" stock using a table saw. If you set up a jig you can cut the bevel on the inside edge or just use a sander.

You may need to trim one edge of the aluminum so it's flush with top and bottom outside edge? Make sure you finish and seal the wood part of the threshold before attaching the angle. Apply silicone between the angle and the transition and in the pre-drilled screw holes. You will also be siliconing the bottom when you fasten the completed threshold to the sub-flooring making sure not to fasten the threshold to the finished floor.

Do you need me to be more specific?
--
Stop The Mindless Killings Stop Over Fishing



Karl Bode
News Guy
join:2000-03-02
kudos:39

No I get it. Looks like a good idea, though the vast majority of thresholds I see are tapered, and they all seem to tack another 1/4 inch onto the bamboo I'm installing, which the door already doesn't clear....would be nice if they just made a low profile tapering metal threshold I could tack on over the expansion gap....

You know, like something that started like this:

»www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1vZ1···Id=10053

but was wider, thinner, shaped kind of like an end cap or threshold transition and sloped downward?



tschmidt
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-12
Milford, NH
kudos:9
Reviews:
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reply to Karl Bode

We have several areas in our house where standard threshold would not work.
Have you thought about getting a piece of oak lumber, or other durable hardwood, the width of the door opening? Use a table saw to cut it to different thicknesses so it rests on new floor and old floor at the door. Then take a router or table saw to mill the edge facing the room. Give it a coat of urethane to protect the wood.

/tom



Karl Bode
News Guy
join:2000-03-02
kudos:39

1 edit
reply to Karl Bode

Ok, after playing around a bit, I'm not even sure I can get that pink piece up without doing serious damage to the plywood and other supporting wood around it. It looks cheap but it's solid, and it's ridiculously tightly fixed to the wood.

I guess I can probably cut it out.

Are pieces like this really used by people as exterior, weather resistant thresholds with the door resting directly above the flat portion of the piece?

»www.lumberliquidators.com/catalo···tId=1448


Msradell
P.E.
Premium
join:2008-12-25
Louisville, KY

said by Karl Bode:

Are pieces like this really used by people as exterior, weather resistant thresholds with the door resting directly above the flat portion of the piece?
Not that I've ever seen!

cwm1276

join:2004-01-16
Stillman Valley, IL
reply to Karl Bode

Pergo used to make a little L like piece, similar to a trim piece you would put on an outside corner of wall. It was only big enough to cover the expansion joint and slip into the joint.

It is much smaller than the T bar stuff they suggest you use today plus it does not have quite the height.

I thankfully could reuse mine when I replace may patio door last year as only silicone caulk holds it on place and I could cut off the old caulk and put new in.


robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
reply to Msradell

said by Msradell:

said by Karl Bode:

Are pieces like this really used by people as exterior, weather resistant thresholds with the door resting directly above the flat portion of the piece?
Not that I've ever seen!
Correct -- that is a transition piece for indoor use.


dolphins
Clean Up Our Oceans
Premium
join:2001-08-22
Westville, NJ
kudos:7
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 recommendation

reply to Karl Bode

Aesthetically speaking I would go with my custom exterior transition threshold. If done right it will last the lifetime of the door. You can also find a local metal fabrication shop that can bend aluminum sheet/plate or cut from stock a custom threshold although you will need to design it yourself and submit a detailed drawing. Otherwise you'll need get a new door or remove the whole patio door assembly to rebuild it to fit the new dimensions.

If you are unable to do any of the above, you will need to call a contractor.
--
Stop The Mindless Killings Stop Over Fishing


popper

join:2006-05-30
Baton Rouge,
kudos:1
reply to Karl Bode

I'll agree with robbin. The plywood looks as if it was installed after the door unit was i place which means any approach other than taking the door unit out will be custom. I can't really judge what type of threshold is installed now, but the one at HD (in the first post) is typically fastened to the jambs and glued to the floor.
GL



Karl Bode
News Guy
join:2000-03-02
kudos:39

3 edits

1 recommendation

Click for full size
Click for full size
Well the door is cut-table. It was already cut, and already custom. Removing and reinstalling the entire door system seemed unnecessary.

I decided to go with dolphins' suggestion and go custom.

I found a piece of higher-end bamboo tapering transition (though the pic doesn't look it), custom cut a piece of wood to fit, nailed them down, poly-d the whole thing, sealed the edges with silicon and caulk, nudged it up against the existing plastic screen door track, placed a silver tread on top (sealing that too), then cut the door another quarter inch to fit.

It allows me my 1/4 to 1/2 inch hardwood expansion gap and something a little more resilient to wear and tear.

The bamboo transition strip may not be the best thing to be facing the weather, but it's not only protected by ridiculous layers of sealant, it's protected by roof overhang, the sliding door track, silicone, and the one inch lip of the screen door -- plus plastic if I seal the screen during winter.

The door also closes better than it did when I found it. Next summer I'll tackle the aging deck....

Edit: hah...noticed my cat's head made its way into the second pic.

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1

said by Karl Bode:

Well the door is cut-table. It was already cut, and already custom.
I'm glad you found a solution. I hope it holds to the weather. I do want to comment on your statement I quoted. From the pics you posted, the door had not been cut and was not already custom. The pictures you posted show the factory build of an Atrium door. That is the way they were built. Be careful not to distort the truth!


Karl Bode
News Guy
join:2000-03-02
kudos:39

The original pic only showed the door swung 90 degrees in shadow. I'm obviously not gaining anything by distorting what I was dealing with. Only one side opens, and that side had already been cut perhaps 1/4 inch to simply deal with having to close over a transition.....

I truly do appreciate the input!



dolphins
Clean Up Our Oceans
Premium
join:2001-08-22
Westville, NJ
kudos:7
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 recommendation

Good job! I knew you'd get it figured out. Looks like one of your cat's nine lives wanted to take a peek.
--
Stop The Mindless Killings Stop Over Fishing



Msradell
P.E.
Premium
join:2008-12-25
Louisville, KY
reply to Karl Bode

said by Karl Bode:

The original pic only showed the door swung 90 degrees in shadow. I'm obviously not gaining anything by distorting what I was dealing with. Only one side opens, and that side had already been cut perhaps 1/4 inch to simply deal with having to close over a transition.
It's actually the way they are manufactured. The door that is designed to swing is manufactured shorter to allow for the swing. I'm sure it wasn't cut it to you cut it. Your solution looks quite good. Even if the bamboo deteriorates it shouldn't be too hard to replace.