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MDColson

join:2002-12-20
West Hartford, CT

Microwave / Gas Range

I just pulled a new 12ga wire on a 20A circuit for my microwave. The location where my junction box ended up, and where the wire leaves my basement for the microwave, is in a very convenient place to put a new outlet in for my gas range.

Is putting these two appliances on the same circuit a code or safety problem? I can't imagine the stove draws much, the electricity is used essentially for the clock/ignitors.

Thanks,

Mark


Msradell
P.E.
Premium
join:2008-12-25
Louisville, KY
As long as the total current draw is within limits you are okay. You can probably determine this by looking at the nameplates of both appliances. You don't want to exceed 80% as a rule of thumb so in this case you would want to be about 16 amps continuous load.


nunya
LXI 483
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:12
reply to MDColson
More than likely, you'll be fine. The gas range probably draws "next to nothing".


Lurch77
Premium
join:2001-11-22
Oconto, WI
kudos:4
reply to MDColson
Our new house is wired and piped for use of either a gas or electric range. The circuit for electric is on its own, obviously. But the outlet for a gas range use is tied in with the above range microwave and a few outlets. Gas ranges use almost no electricity.
--
With a bike, you could die of exposure on your own schedule and not depend on others. ~ Peter Egan


macsierra8
Baby Newfoundland
Premium
join:2003-11-30
Minden, NV
reply to MDColson
As long as you don't have a dual fuel gas range it will be fine. In our remodel I ended up with a dual fuel gas/electric convection range/oven and a big convection microwave Kitchenaid combo.

I ran a separate 20 amp circuit to the microwave with oversized 10 gauge romex left over from a roll. I've had nothing but trouble with microwaves failing over the years and I suspect voltage drop on startup was the main culprit.
--
I was against Obama before it was cool!
Elect anyone BUTT Harry Reid!

saratoga66

join:2002-08-22
Saratoga, CA

1 edit
reply to MDColson
422.16(B)(4) requires receptacles supplying range hoods to be on an individual branch circuit. While installing the receptacle supplying the gas range would probably never cause any problems it is a code violation.


tp0d
yabbazooie
Premium
join:2001-02-13
Carnegie, PA
kudos:6
Gas ranges -do- use 3-4 amps when heating the ignitor for the oven. The sparker and clock are probably less than 20watts though..

just an fyi

-j
--
if it aint broke, tweak it!!
currently on FiOS (kick aZZ!)


whizkid3
Premium,MVM
join:2002-02-21
Queens, NY
kudos:9

1 edit
reply to Msradell
said by Msradell:

As long as the total current draw is within limits you are okay. You can probably determine this by looking at the nameplates of both appliances. You don't want to exceed 80% as a rule of thumb so in this case you would want to be about 16 amps continuous load.
Bear in mind, that the NEC requires that when circuits are used for a combination of fixed-in-place appliances, and receptacles (cord&plug connected loads), that the total load of the fixed-in-place appliances does not draw more than 50% of the branch circuit's rating.

So, assuming its a 20A circuit, as long as the microwave does not exceed 10 amps (1200 VA), it should be fine. If it does (and its certainly a possibility), then you should put the receptacle for the range on another circuit to be code compliant. Neither is considered a continuous load, so there is no 80% requirement.


MDColson

join:2002-12-20
West Hartford, CT

2 edits
Is a microwave and a gas range considered a combination of fixed-in-place and cord/plug? It would seem to me they are both fixed in place AND cord/plug in that neither of them are hard wired.

I suppose I could put it on one of the counter top circuits, but it would be a much neater job in the basement if it would work on the microwave circuit.

The installation manual for the microwave says: 120 volts AC, 60 Hertz, 15 amps and 1.58 kilowatts. (The information page on the website says Microwave Watts = 1000W using IEC-705)

The installation manual for the range says: 120V; 60Hz; 5A.


whizkid3
Premium,MVM
join:2002-02-21
Queens, NY
kudos:9

2 edits
said by MDColson:

Is a microwave and a gas range considered a combination of fixed-in-place and cord/plug? It would seem to me they are both fixed in place AND cord/plug in that neither of them are hard wired.
If you mean a microwave that is bolted to the wall above a counter or range, then it is 'fixed-in-place'. Likewise, a free standing range is fixed-in-place and so is a refrigerator for that matter. In spite of the fact that they plug into receptacles. So, they fall under both the NEC requirements for cord & plug appliances and fixed-in-place.

said by MDColson:

I suppose I could put it on one of the counter top circuits, but it would be a much neater job in the basement if it would work on the microwave circuit.
By 'it', you mean the range. While it may be neater, and also easier and cheaper, you still should make the installation code compliant. Otherwise, we will be seeing a new post from you, like many others, titled 'why are my circuit breakers tripping'.

said by MDColson:

The installation manual for the microwave says: 120 volts AC, 60 Hertz, 15 amps and 1.58 kilowatts. (The information page on the website says Microwave Watts = 1000W using IEC-705). The installation manual for the range says: 120V; 60Hz; 5A.
Assuming you have a 20 amp circuit, putting them both on the same circuit would not be code compliant. As well, your circuit would be overloaded. For the purposes being discussed here, both are fixed-in-place appliances. The 50% load requirement for fixed-in-place appliances in combination with (other) receptacles for cord&plug appliances would not apply, assuming you have no other receptacles on the circuit. However, the problem is that you exceed the NEC requirement not to go over 80% of the circuit's rating (16 amps).

And you can not put either one one on the same circuit as the over-counter receptacles, as they are likely the two required 20A 'small appliance' circuits, which can not have anything else (especially fixed-in-place) appliances on the same circuits. (And this would assume that your kitchen wiring is up to date with respect to the electrical code).

But what can you do to make life easier? Assuming again, that you kitchen wiring is up-to-date; you can put the small 5A load of the new range on one of the circuits that, for example, supplies wall receptacles to the kitchen or dining room, etc. Or, if you are fortunate enough to have refrigerator with a dedicated circuit, you can check to see that the combination of the range and refrigerator load would not exceed 16amps, and put it on that circuit. Otherwise, me thinks you are out of luck, and should simply add another circuit. And with a new circuit, you could add another 11 amps worth of receptacles or other appliances to it later.

- not putting


MDColson

join:2002-12-20
West Hartford, CT
Thanks for your comments and help. I am by no means trying to be argumentative - just trying to learn.

I have looked online quite a bit and it would seem putting the gas range ignitor on one of the small appliance circuits is one of the two exceptions to the rule that the small appliance circuits shall have no other outlets on them.

210.52(B)(2) No Other Outlets

Small-appliance branch circuits feeding receptacles in kitchens, pantries, breakfast rooms, dining rooms and similar areas shall have no other outlets. While general-purpose branch circuits can feed lights and receptacles, small-appliance branch circuits cannot. Small-appliance branch circuits can only feed receptacles in kitchens and other rooms specified in 210.52(B)(1). Lighting outlets and hood fans are not permitted on small-appliance branch circuits. Outdoor receptacles cannot be fed from small-appliance branch circuits.

Two exceptions pertain to this provision.

• A receptacle installed to supply and support an electric clock in any of the rooms specified in 210.52(B)(1) can be fed from a small-appliance branch circuit. [210.52(B)(2) Exception No. 1.]

• The second exception pertains to gas cooking equipment. A receptacle installed to provide power for supplemental equipment and lighting on gas-fired ranges, ovens or counter-mounted cooking units can be fed from a small-appliance branch circuit. [210.52(B)(2) Exception No. 2.]

saratoga66

join:2002-08-22
Saratoga, CA
reply to MDColson
For some reason when I first read the topic I thought the OP had installed a microwave over the range (micro/hood). Apparently I read too much into this thread so my previous post does not apply.


whizkid3
Premium,MVM
join:2002-02-21
Queens, NY
kudos:9

1 edit
reply to MDColson
said by MDColson:

The second exception pertains to gas cooking equipment. A receptacle installed to provide power for supplemental equipment and lighting on gas-fired ranges, ovens or counter-mounted cooking units can be fed from a small-appliance branch circuit. [210.52(B)(2) Exception No. 2.]
Good catch!

The point must be that the very short duration, small current use of a gas stove igniter, is not going to be a big deal, even if you are running your toaster and waffle iron at the same time.

I missed that. Go ahead and put it on one of the two 20A small-appliance circuits; and then have a beer!