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DaveinNC

join:2010-11-03
Charlotte, NC

Which 2210 is the "right" 2210?

The AT&T Equipment Shop says that the right 2210 for us in the SE states is 2210-02-1009. When I had DSL installed in Aug, the tech installed a 2210-02-1006 (w/5 LEDs). FAQs for this site concur with -1006 (although the model shown has only 4 LEDs).

The Equipment Shop says the right 2210 for those in the midwest is 2210-02-1022.

I decided I wanted a backup modem; went down to my local Walmart (not AT&T store) and bought "AT&T - Motorola High Speed DSL" kit, with 2210 modem. But when I opened the box, turned out to be a 2210-02-1022, 5 LEDs, w/ "Style: MSTATEA" sticker.

Do I need to take this back to WalMart? Or will a -1022 still work OK in the SE, despite what Equipment Shop says?



NetFixer
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3 edits

The 2210-02-1022 is the currently shipping (and retail sales) modem for the entire AT&T footprint. It will work just fine in the legacy BellSouth area. The 2210-02-1002 used to be the modem used in the legacy SBC area, and the2210-02-1006 used to be the modem used in the legacy BellSouth area. The 4/5 LED difference was a Motorola manufacturing change which was not directly related to the AT&T model designations.

I personally don't care for the crippled firmware that it ships with, but what you see is what you get. The most serious limitation for a typical user is that its DHCP server will only allow one connected PC to use DHCP. It also does not have telnet management capability, syslog capabilities, or a true SPI firewall.

Fortunately, if you don't like the crippled SBC firmware, you can install the older more advanced BallSouth/AT&T SE firmware on the 2210-02-1022. My understanding is that the retail versions have the AT&T SE firmware on the included CD, but I can provide you with a link if you need it.

Here is a link to the att-training.net 2210 sumulator site where you can compare the features available in each of the 2210 modems used by AT&T: »att-training.net/simulator/index.htm

EDIT: Unfortunately, the 2210 simulator site seems to be down. I guess that AT&T does not want AT&T SE customers to know what the latest 2210 modem took away from them.
--
History does not long entrust the care of freedom to the weak or the timid.
-- Dwight D. Eisenhower
The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants.
-- Thomas Jefferson


jjcox19

join:2001-04-16
Edgewater, FL

said by NetFixer:

The 2210-02-1022 is the currently shipping (and retail sales) modem for the entire AT&T footprint.
Went to Walmart yesterday and purchased a Motorola/AT&T modem. Opened the box and it was a 2210-02-1006 5 LED. There was a date sticker on the box September 2010. Could this be a remanufactured unit or is Motorola still making this model?


ndt

join:2008-08-22
Picayune, MS
reply to DaveinNC

I've been using the 2210-02-1022 that I got from walmart here in Mississippi for the last year,after my original 1006 failed.Have had no problems so far.

On your 2210-02-1022 don't forget to write down the Modem Access Code located on the bottom of the unit.You will need it each time you access the modem to check something.



NetFixer
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reply to jjcox19

said by jjcox19:

said by NetFixer:

The 2210-02-1022 is the currently shipping (and retail sales) modem for the entire AT&T footprint.
Went to Walmart yesterday and purchased a Motorola/AT&T modem. Opened the box and it was a 2210-02-1006 5 LED. There was a date sticker on the box September 2010. Could this be a remanufactured unit or is Motorola still making this model?
My understanding was that AT&T is no longer officially supplying the 2210-02-1006. However, it would make financial sense for AT&T, Best Buy, Walmart, et al to clear out existing stock. Walmart certainly has the buying power to insist that Motorola continue to provide them with whatever they request (and the purchasing savvy to get a bargain price for any old stock).
--
History does not long entrust the care of freedom to the weak or the timid.
-- Dwight D. Eisenhower
The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants.
-- Thomas Jefferson


wayjac
Premium,MVM
join:2001-12-22
Indy
kudos:1
reply to jjcox19

said by jjcox19:

purchased a Motorola/AT&T modem. Opened the box and it was a 2210-02-1006 5 LED
All the at&t 2210 modems have 5 lights there are no at&t 2210 modems with four lights
said by jjcox19:

There was a date sticker on the box September 2010. Could this be a remanufactured unit or is Motorola still making this model?
You should check the warranty date and software version displayed in the modem gui
A warranty date is the date the modem makes it's first pppoe connection

Motorola still manufactures the same 2210 hardware it's the software that is changes


antro

@bellsouth.net

Hi, All,

I have gotten a bit confused and am un-sure what I am asking. So, I beg forgiveness now.

I have been using 2210-02-1006 happily, until it died this week.

Now I have a 2210-02-1022, which so far is un-familiar. The GUI is completely disorienting.

I also sit it behind a Belkin router.

What I can't figure out is how to forward ports on this new modem. Before I had to forward ports on both the router and the modem, but now I can't figure out how to forward ports on the 2210-02-1022. I use this for gaming and vnc connections.

The firmware is 7.75r8. Does the firmware control the GUI and the NAT/Gaming features? Is there a way to change this firmware? If so, how?

I would prefer to have a feature set similar to the 2210-02-1006 because I am familiar with using and configuring that one.

I also read that the firmware might not matter if I have a router. Is that true? Can I just forward ports on my router and be done with it? Do I have to put the 2210-02-1022 in bridge mode to do that?

Thank you to anyone who can help me make sense of all this. I really do appreciate any help.

antro



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1 edit

To put your 2210-02-1022 into bridge mode, you have to change the ppp location as shown in the image below:




Of course, if you do this you will need to setup your other router to do PPPoE authentication instead of using DHCP as it now probably does.

There is also an IP Passthrough mode that bypasses NAT and puts the public IP directly on the WAN port of your other router. That is enabled as shown at the bottom of the image below:




If you want a copy of the AT&T SE 7.7.3r7 firmware so that your 2210-02-1022 looks and behaves like your old 2210-02-1006, you will need to become a member so that I can send you a link to where you can download a copy of the 7.7.3r7 firmware via IM (I will not post that link publicly).
--
History does not long entrust the care of freedom to the weak or the timid.
-- Dwight D. Eisenhower
The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants.
-- Thomas Jefferson

antro2

join:2010-11-06

Thank you, NetFixer.

It sounds as though I could do one or the other of these solutions, not both.

All my computers have been assigned static IPs already because of previous port forwarding, so if that is the case, is the IP pass through the easiest method?

And, I am now a member. I would be very grateful to have that firmware you offered. Would I just use the Manual Update method and point it to the file you send?

It might make some difference to know I am on a Mac OS X (10.5) machine. (not sure if it matters in the case of the modem files)

Thank you again.

antro



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1 edit

said by antro2:

Thank you, NetFixer.

It sounds as though I could do one or the other of these solutions, not both.

All my computers have been assigned static IPs already because of previous port forwarding, so if that is the case, is the IP pass through the easiest method?

And, I am now a member. I would be very grateful to have that firmware you offered. Would I just use the Manual Update method and point it to the file you send?

It might make some difference to know I am on a Mac OS X (10.5) machine. (not sure if it matters in the case of the modem files)

Thank you again.

antro
I just sent you an IM with the link to my copy of the 7.7.3r7 firmware. You are correct in that you would do a manual install and point to the extracted firmware file (the link points to a .zip archive file). I assume that your Macs have a utility to extract a file from the .zip archive?

If you choose to put your modem into bridge mode or IP passthrough mode, you are correct that it is either/or not both.

As for IP addresses for devices on your LAN, that will depend on how you have them connected. If they were connected to your 2210 through a switch, then you may need to do some reconfiguring if you choose to now connect them to another router and use your modem as only a bridge device (IP passthrough is also a type of bridge mode, but would require that your other router use DHCP instead of doing PPPoE authentication).

If you were previously cascading your internet connection through another router to your 2210, then no changes should be required (but you would of course need to do any required port forwarding in your other router, as I assume you would have already been doing).

If you install the 7.7.3r7 firmware and keep things connected and configured the same way (whatever way that is), then no changes would likely be required.
--
History does not long entrust the care of freedom to the weak or the timid.
-- Dwight D. Eisenhower
The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants.
-- Thomas Jefferson

BLSComcast

join:2010-11-11
Barrow, AK

There is absolute nothing special about those firmware between the 1022 and 1006 right?

The only thing I see is that special code I have to do to get into the 1022. More password and numbers to remember.

The last time I see those interface is just to put it in bypass mode and never see it again cause I use my own router with 3rd party software.



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3 edits

said by BLSComcast:

There is absolute nothing special about those firmware between the 1022 and 1006 right?

The only thing I see is that special code I have to do to get into the 1022. More password and numbers to remember.

The last time I see those interface is just to put it in bypass mode and never see it again cause I use my own router with 3rd party software.
The primary differences between the 1022 and 1006 modems only come into play if you also use it as a router and firewall. If you put it into bridge mode (which is what I assume you are calling bypass mode) and use an external router it will probably make no difference to most users which modem is used (or which version firmware is installed).

If you do use a 2210 "modem" as a router/firewall, there are plenty of differences.

The 1022 modem (running default firmware) only allows 1 PC attached to its LAN to use DHCP, the 1006 modem has no such limitation.

The 1022 modem (running default firmware) is only a simple NAT router, it does not have SPI firewall features, the 1006 modem has an SPI firewall.

The 1022 modem (running default firmware) does not have a telnet command line interface, the 1006 modem has a telnet command line interface from which many advanced features (not available in the GUI menus) may be controlled.

The 1022 modem (running default firmware) does not have external syslog capability, the 1006 modem can send log messages to an external syslog server.

The list goes on...

Loading the AT&T SE 7.7.3r7 firmware into a 1022 modem enables most of the advanced 1006 features on the 1022 modem.
--
History does not long entrust the care of freedom to the weak or the timid.
-- Dwight D. Eisenhower
The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants.
-- Thomas Jefferson

BLSComcast

join:2010-11-11
Barrow, AK

Yes, what I mean is bridge mode. After that, I dont see the Motorola interface.

Do you put yours "connect on demand" on the Motorola? And 1492?



NetFixer
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2 edits

Normally I use my 2210 modems in bridge mode and do the PPPoE in my RV082 router with the MTU set for 1492.

I do sometimes do the PPP on the 2210 modems when I need to do some testing of the internet path between my two circuits (my RV082 automatically does an internal loopback and will not allow me to do that when the internet IP addresses are assigned to its WAN interfaces). When I do that I usually do PPPoA in the 2210 modems instead of PPPoE, so I then set the MTU to 1500.

I do not use "connect on demand" whether I do the PPP in the 2210 modems or in my RV082 router. I always use "always on" or "keep alive". The "connect on demand" feature is a holdover from dial-up days and can only serve to cause problems in an environment that expects the internet connection to always be live. I really can not think of any reason for using "connect on demand" for a DSL circuit that does not have metered usage charges.

FYI, it is still possible to access the 2210 modems to get stats and logs (mine in fact automatically send log information to my syslog server) even when they are in bridge mode. You just have to provide a separate path from the router doing the PPPoE to access them. Most people just don't want (or need) that functionality. Below is a diagram of my network, where you can see the secondary routers that I use to access my modems for maintenance even when they are in bridge mode. Those two routers primarily function as a WiFi access point and a print server. The ability to use them as backdoor access to my bridged modems is just a side benefit.




Here is a traceroute showing that the two modems (dcs-gwm and dcs-gwn) are accessible through the secondary routers (dcs-ap1 and dcs-ps1), dcs-gw1 is my primary RV082 router.

Tracing route to dcs-gwm.dcs-net [192.168.8.254]
over a maximum of 30 hops:
 
  1     1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  dcs-gw1.dcs-net [192.168.10.1]
  2     1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  dcs-ap1.dcs-net [192.168.10.8]
  3     1 ms     1 ms     1 ms  dcs-gwm.dcs-net [192.168.8.254]
 
Trace complete.
 
Tracing route to dcs-gwn.dcs-net [192.168.9.254]
over a maximum of 30 hops:
 
  1     1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  dcs-gw1.dcs-net [192.168.10.1]
  2     1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  dcs-ps1.dcs-net [192.168.10.9]
  3     1 ms     1 ms     1 ms  dcs-gwn.dcs-net [192.168.9.254]
 
Trace complete.
 
 
--
History does not long entrust the care of freedom to the weak or the timid.
-- Dwight D. Eisenhower
The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants.
-- Thomas Jefferson

BLSComcast

join:2010-11-11
Barrow, AK

1. I use 'connect on demand' thinking that the router (WRT54GL) will want to connect to the modem when it wants it. Is that not the reason?

2. I notice my connection is less than a day each day. But I dont feel anything cause I think the router connect on right away. Change it to "always on" ?

3. You have DSL coming in at 2 ends from your diagram?

4. I thought ATT say cannot run any webserver or email server.

5. I cant see 192.168.1.254 and my Gateway is 192.168.1.1



NetFixer
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4 edits

said by BLSComcast:

1. I use 'connect on demand' thinking that the router (WRT54GL) will want to connect to the modem when it wants it. Is that not the reason?
The "connect on demand" setting means that after a predetermined idle period your PPP session will drop and then need to be re-established if an application needs internet access. How smoothly that works depends on the applications and how quickly the PPP session reconnects (and if the application can tolerate an IP address change in the middle of what it might consider a single session if your DSL account does not have a static IP address)




said by BLSComcast:

2. I notice my connection is less than a day each day. But I dont feel anything cause I think the router connect on right away. Change it to "always on" ?
That would most likely stop the less than daily disconnects.

said by BLSComcast:

3. You have DSL coming in at 2 ends from your diagram?
Yes, I have two DSL circuits that are load balanced by my RV082 router.

In addition to a greater composite bandwidth, it also provides me with partial redundancy since the circuits go to different DSLAMs. I used to have full redundancy all the way to the first AT&T internet backbone router, but after some recent AT&T infrastructure changes, my redundancy is now gone at the ATM cloud.

said by BLSComcast:

4. I thought ATT say cannot run any webserver or email server.
There is nothing in the current ATT/Yahoo TOS or AUP that prohibits internet servers. Residential accounts (and even some small business accounts) do have SMTP port 25 filtered, but you can send email using AT&T's email server as a smarthost. For incoming email, I use several dedicated ATT/Yahoo email accounts as pseudo "store and forward" accounts which also allows incoming email to work even with the inbound port 25 block (that also allows me to use ATT/Yahoo servers and bandwidth for spam/malware filtering).

said by BLSComcast:

5. I cant see 192.168.1.254 and my Gateway is 192.168.1.1
That is normal for two reasons:

1. If you are using PPPoE on your WRT54GL, that itself blocks TCPIP access to the bridged modem from the WRT54GL's WAN interface. You would need a second path to the 2210 to be able to access its setup/maintenance web pages, and the 2210 and WRT54GL LAN interfaces would need to be on different IP subnets in order for the routing to work.

2. Even if you used both your 2210 and WRT54GL as routers, having both the 2210's LAN and the WRT54GL's LAN on the same IP subnet would prevent routing between the two devices.

Look at the traceroute example I provided in my previous post to see that my 2210 modems and my RV082 are all on different IP subnets (and that the modems are reached using a secondary path through another router).
--
History does not long entrust the care of freedom to the weak or the timid.
-- Dwight D. Eisenhower
The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants.
-- Thomas Jefferson