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Sbrav77
Premium
join:2004-03-02
Bourbonnais, IL

Garage Door Cables keep coming loose

I"m having issues with our almost new garage door. I had a buddy from work repair it about a month ago due to a neighbor that tried to pry the center of the door and pop the lift arm off to gain access. All was working fine til a few days ago. The door seemed to be catching while closing. Upon closer inspection, I found the lift cables on the sides of the door had become wound around themselves and was getting caught. The door is a Chamberlain and is about a year old or so. It uses the torsion spring design. I locked the door open and took off both cables first. Then I closed the door and released the tension on the spring. I then re tensioned the spring and would the cables back around the drums one at a time and tightened each drum getting the cable as tight as I could on each side. I attempted to manually open the door and found the door got about half way up. Then the cables would lose tension and get wound up around the drums again. I tried several times and had the same results.
I'm at a lose at to what could be causing this. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks in advance everyone.


dingo4
Premium
join:2009-02-08
kudos:1

1 recommendation

Torsion springs can take your arm off. I fix almost everything myself, but will not touch them. I would surmise something is bent as well. Call a professional.



Lurch77
Premium
join:2001-11-22
Oconto, WI
kudos:4

1 recommendation

reply to Sbrav77

Like you, I would have tried doing what I can to fix it. But at this point I'd call in the door pros. They'll save you frustration for not too much money. And the neighbor would be getting the bill or an ass beating, which ever he prefers.
--
With a bike, you could die of exposure on your own schedule and not depend on others. ~ Peter Egan


Sbrav77
Premium
join:2004-03-02
Bourbonnais, IL

Actually the neighbor broke into the garage while my uncle had the house. We bought it from my uncle. A buddy from work is gonna take another look at the door to see what he can do. Hopefully he can get it working again.



eatatjoz
Premium
join:2002-06-16
Mayflower, AR
kudos:3

2 recommendations

reply to Sbrav77

Is your top section creased? If so, you'll need to add a strut in addition to these instructions or get a new section.
This is based on a 7' high door with a normal spring setup. No low headroom stuff or any weird out of the ordinary counter balance system.

Get enough 1/2" cold roll steel bar to make two 18" winding bars. If you decide to use screwdrivers or 3/8 drive extensions, your stupid and don't need to touch the thing.
I'm assuming that you're not because you have wound them once already.

I think your problem is either 1: the door is creased, 2: incorrect tension or wound backwards. 3: God only knows, because I'm not looking at the door.

You're going to need to unwind the springs and start from scratch, so either raise the door and pop the cables off the drums like you did before,and lower it back down, or unwind them with it on the floor. DO NOT back the set screws off without a winding bar in place. I've seen one guy that lost three fingers because he just backed the set screws off with a wrench and was trying to hold the spring with his hand.

LOCK THE DOOR, AND RELEASE THE OPENER.

Now that you're unwound, loosen the set screws on the drums,
and set the door parallel to the tracks. You can use a block of wood or something under the door. If it's already sitting correctly, your concrete guys did a good job and I haven't seen much of that in years.

Starting with the left side, wrap your cable around the drum.

While holding the drum with the cable taught, set a pair of vice-grips on the shaft so that it doesn't move.

wind the cable around the right drum, and set the screws on it. Once they touch the tube/shaft, give them another 1/2 to 3/4 turn.

Now we're going to wind the springs to about 7 turns. I generally put 29 to thirty quarters on them and adjust from there.

Wind the springs up, with your body away from the spring. ALWAYS have at least one winding bar in the cone at any given time. Make sure that the bar fits, and is seated fully.

Once you have seven turns on the springs, get off your ladder, put your foot on the bottom of the door and release the lock.

The door shouldn't raise, and should be buoyant. If it jumps get the hell out of the way and let it fuck up something besides you.

Raise the door slowly to the open position without using any real lifting. If it doesn't raise with 5lbs of pressure, you'll throw the cables again and you don't want to be under it.

If all of this is successful, check the jambs for obstructions. If the door flops when raised, it's torn and needs replaced. Don't run the motor until you have raised and lowered it by hand a few times.

I can get more detailed tomorrow when I haven't been drinking, but if you understand what I'm saying, I think you'll be okay.
Just don't get in a hurry, and be very nervous.

A door man is cheaper than an ER visit.
--
"I hope you did something important today, 'cause it cost ya another day of your life."


robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1

said by eatatjoz:

Get enough 1/2" cold roll steel bar to make two 18" winding bars

Just a note -- 1/2" steel rod is usually available at the big box stores in 3' lengths.

Sbrav77
Premium
join:2004-03-02
Bourbonnais, IL
reply to eatatjoz

Yes. The door was creased in the center. My buddy that worked on it last time had an L shaped steel bar and pre drilled the bar and then pressed the door panel straight and bolted the steel bar in place. The door closed flush with the seal when he first fixed it so I'm most certain he straightened out the panel.



eatatjoz
Premium
join:2002-06-16
Mayflower, AR
kudos:3

Look between the top two sections (panels) behind the center style, under the operator arm. You'll probably find a tear on those two sections.
--
"I hope you did something important today, 'cause it cost ya another day of your life."


Sbrav77
Premium
join:2004-03-02
Bourbonnais, IL

1 recommendation

reply to Sbrav77

Got it fixed and working finally.Eatatjoz was right on the money about not having enough tension on the spring. My buddy came over and we increased the tension until the door went up and tension was kept on the cable to keep it from jumping out of place on the drum.
Just a side note. I found the owners manual for our door and found it was the easy tension system. There is a screw on the tensioning unit that you use a drill with socket attachment to turn. As it turns it increases the tension without the need to use a winding bar. It takes longer to get the tension built up. But, it's a lot safer and much easier than cranking it up by hand using the winding bar.


dingo4
Premium
join:2009-02-08
kudos:1

great...and beat the really cold weather as well.



eatatjoz
Premium
join:2002-06-16
Mayflower, AR
kudos:3
reply to Sbrav77

Sounds like a Wayne Dalton "torque force" door.
Glad you got it fixed. Now you just need to lubricate it and you'll be good for a while.
--
"I hope you did something important today, 'cause it cost ya another day of your life."


zen1

join:2010-12-06
reply to Sbrav77

said by Sbrav77:

Actually the neighbor broke into the garage while my uncle had the house. We bought it from my uncle. A buddy from work is gonna take another look at the door to see what he can do. Hopefully he can get it working again.

the neighbor should pay for the repairs as part of his sentence or probation!!.


ProtusMose
Immortal. Eternal.
Premium
join:2001-10-03
Bellevue, NE
kudos:4
Reviews:
·ooma

1 recommendation

reply to eatatjoz

Great information. Only thing I would really add is a clarification on the "one winding bar in at a time." It's kind of moot since he's got the door fixed but someone else could be reading it. When winding it up, get it high enough that there's a hole pretty much vertical and get the winding bar in that one. That way if something happens, it locks up against the door. Don't start winding up until the bottom one's snug and the top one is completely out. I've seen someone about crack their skull open when they lost a grip on the bottom bar and the top wasn't completely out yet. Luckily he only had a turn or a turn and a quarter on it.
--
Blogsaus "Everyone bows to something. Everyone answers to someone. Wherever your treasure lies, there your heart will be also.

Who do you belong to? " - Andrew Schwab


Sbrav77
Premium
join:2004-03-02
Bourbonnais, IL
reply to Sbrav77

On a side note. The door is about a 1 1/2 years old and was purchased from Menards. I believe chamberlain calls it the easy torque system.



mattmag
Premium,ExMod 2000-03
join:2000-04-09
NW Illinois
kudos:3
reply to eatatjoz

said by eatatjoz:

Now you just need to lubricate it and you'll be good for a while.

Could you elaborate on this part please? I know there is a right way and a lot of wrong ways to do this, so I'm thinking many of us here could learn from your professional experience.

Thanks--


eatatjoz
Premium
join:2002-06-16
Mayflower, AR
kudos:3

I shall write up some of the more common door maintenance stuff tomorrow.
It's dark now, and I'd rather add a few pictures for better explanation.
--
"I hope you did something important today, 'cause it cost ya another day of your life."



Nick_L
Premium
join:2003-01-22
Pittsburgh, PA

I just wanted to add a little "bump" to this as a reminder, in case you get the opportunity to do your write up.



eatatjoz
Premium
join:2002-06-16
Mayflower, AR
kudos:3

Oops! forgot.



open caliber

@cox.net
reply to Sbrav77

I have a 7x16 door that I just insulated and after adjusting for the added weight my door when closed is up off the floor about a half inch on the right side. I noticed that the drum cable doesn't have any tension on the left side and pretty tight on the right and seems to be holding the door up some. Can cable tension be adjusted on the drum without releasing the main springs?



eatatjoz
Premium
join:2002-06-16
Mayflower, AR
kudos:3

Yes.
It's called "slipping the drum"
It involves releasing the set screws slowly, and I won't tell you how to do it.
That's more dangerous than the initial set of the springs.

Search for truetex on google and start from scratch. Don't risk a finger trying to set one side.
--
"I hope you did something important today, 'cause it cost ya another day of your life."