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aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1

latex paint at low temperatures

I'm painting a few things with Valspar signature eggshell interior latex, but the temperatures are nowhere near the recommended minimum of 50 F.

Aside from longer drying/curing times, will there be any other difference, like paint not sticking as well, or somesuch?

TIA
--
Palin 2012!



Warzau
Premium
join:2000-10-26
Naperville, IL
kudos:1

It won't produce a nice film, and crack.



The Pig
I know you want to be me
Premium
join:2009-09-11
reply to aurgathor

If it is to cold it may bubble!



Midgard

join:2010-10-11
MA
kudos:1

1 edit
reply to aurgathor

There's additives you can put into the paint to use it at lower temps like the one below but no idea how well they work.

»www.floodco.com/paint-additive-s···uctId=12

"COLD WEATHER PAINTING

The best time to paint is when the weather is warm and dry, with little wind. Obviously, these kinds of days are few and far between during the Fall. As we approach the cold weather months, the hours of the day that are ideal for painting will shorten.

The latex house painting season starts after the last frost in Spring, then runs until about two weeks before the first expected frost in the Fall. Using latex too late in the Fall, or during an "Indian Summer," can cause great stress on the latex paint film. Cool temperatures during application can interfere with curing and cause coalescence problems. Poor coalescence will result in very early paint failure. Also, subjecting a latex paint film to freeze-thaw cycles during the first two weeks of cure may shorten the long-term life of the paint system. This cycling occurs when the temperatures at night dip below the freezing point causing a "thermal shocking" of the latex paint film which may lead to early embrittlement.

With this in mind, many turn to oil base finishes at this time of year. Latex painting generally has a low temperature application limit of 50° F. This temperature applies to surface, paint and air. Many make the mistake of starting a latex paint project when it hits 51° F. Unknowingly, the siding has not reached this temperature and may contribute to poor coalescence. Also, painting under similar conditions in the latter part of the day may result in wetting agent or glycol bleeding of the latex paint job later, especially when heavy, morning dews are frequent.

Oil based (solvent) finishes are more forgiving in regards to cold weather painting. These finishes cure by oxidation, not coalescence. Cold temperatures will retard oxidation, but are not detrimental to the overall curing of the system. Shake/shingle and oil house and trim finishes will still cure at temperatures as low as 20° F., whereas the lower limit for latex is 40° F.

Even though oil base finishes will tolerate lower temperatures, one still has to watch a couple of key factors. Cool temperatures, along with high humidity, can spell "condensation." Condensation can alter the curing process or change the gloss of the finished paint job, be it alkyd or latex. Temperatures around the freezing point can produce frost formation on the paint job, which can be just as damaging as condensation.

When the mercury starts to drop, be prepared to use an oil based shake/shingle or house and trim finish. Proper coating selection and a little common sense will result in a satisfactory paint job, even though the chill from the north will make it a little unpleasant during application. Application in cold weather may be a little tricky since the paint will not exhibit the same flow and leveling as it did at 70° F. At low temperatures, obtaining film build will be more difficult and brush drag will increase, Care will have to be taken to avoid runs and sags."

»www.goldenglowpaints.com/Article···rptg.htm

More stuff
»tlc.howstuffworks.com/home/how-t···ouse.htm



Ken
Premium,MVM
join:2003-06-16
Markle, IN
reply to aurgathor

The paint won't cure properly, don't do it. I assuming this is something outside? If so can you wait until spring or build a plastic tent and heat it?



Warzau
Premium
join:2000-10-26
Naperville, IL
kudos:1

But paint to properly cure can take up to 2 weeks. So he is going heat that tent that long? I say go with your first suggestion wait till spring.



Midgard

join:2010-10-11
MA
kudos:1
reply to aurgathor

I'd assume outside as well except in the original post it says

said by aurgathor:

I'm painting a few things with Valspar signature eggshell interior latex, but the temperatures are nowhere near the recommended minimum of 50 F.

Aside from longer drying/curing times, will there be any other difference, like paint not sticking as well, or somesuch?

TIA

Not sure why it'd be under 50 in an interior place that needs latex and cannot be heated for a few weeks though.


Pacrat
Old and Cranky
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-10
Cortland, OH
kudos:2

1 recommendation

A new, unheated home, could be that cold inside at this time of year.
--
Alcohol kills germs! Stay drunk... Stay healthy!



aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1
reply to aurgathor

Aside from my bedroom and bathroom, there's no heat in my home, and I'm doing this painting in the living room -- various precisely cut siding pieces that will not be subjected to water and weather because they are going to the bottom of my mobile. I got a bunch of leftover interior paint (didn't like the color) and in this particular application, I don't think it should matter much.

If higher temps are needed for proper curing, I can take them inside my bedroom once the paint is dried, but painting there is not option.
--
Palin 2012!



Warzau
Premium
join:2000-10-26
Naperville, IL
kudos:1

It might work, keep paint in the same temp room you plan to put the pieces in the bedroom.


robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
reply to aurgathor

said by aurgathor:

If higher temps are needed for proper curing, I can take them inside my bedroom once the paint is dried, but painting there is not option.

Siding needs to be above 50 before painting also.


aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1

Good points from both of you. I'll take both the paint and the pieces to be painted for a warm-up session before painting.
--
Palin 2012!


Crescent
Premium
join:2003-01-22
canada
Reviews:
·Eastlink Cable

It would be great to always have perfect conditions for painting but some times we must cheat a little to get the job done.

To pre-warm the wood would improve things.

1 when you move the wood from a warm spot to a cool spot the air in the wood contracts and pulls in the paint. A good demonstration of this is if you had a cool block of wood, coated it and then moved it into a warm environment you can see it blow bubbles in the coating. I have observed this when coating with epoxy resins.

2 a warm block of wood will not get condensation on it from the surrounding air.

It may not be a good idea to move the painted wood into a warm room as it will sweat a little from the temperature change and blow the coating off due to the air inside expanding.

I have had success leaving the painted wood in the cold area and putting a fan on it to speed the cure.
If the air is humid, it is raining out side, your cure time will be longer. If you put on multiple coats it will take months to dry the first coat, and the first bit of water on the wood, months later will lift the paint off in sheets. (been there done that

I will paint in the cold, but only apply one coat a week if it is not optimum curing weather.

You are on the wet West Coast. Painting in damp weather $ucks


zen1

join:2010-12-06
reply to aurgathor

maybe some heat lamps pointed at it during painting and drying would do the trick!.