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themagicone

join:2003-08-13
Osseo, MN

How to get rid of feeling of "cold"?

What are some suggestions to solve the issue of feeling cold in a house? It's not drafty but I can have the heat on 72-74 and just be freezing. I have 4 layers on now and I'm just shaking. I've checked the temp with a few thermometers and they all say 72. It's a constant battle in my house - I turn the heat up to 76-78 but roommate comes behind and puts it at 70 sighting its too expensive (even though we are on budget and pay the same no matter what). This roommate then likes to complain of how damn cold it is and turns on their electric throw blanket, heated mattress pad and lays in bed.

Why does 72 feel soooo cold? If I could get 72 to feel like 72 I wouldn't turn the heat up to 78. I don't like freezing so energy savings to me isn't a factor at this moment.


Warzau
Premium
join:2000-10-26
Naperville, IL
kudos:1

Re: How to get rid of feeling of "cold"?

First thing first do you have a humidifier? Low humidity make you feel cold,moisture from your skin will evaporate at a faster rate, causing you to feel cooler. It's the same argument in summer, dry heat isn't so hot, but high humidity low air temp it it doesn't evaporate and you feel sticky, feels like a sauna. Get a humidifier and a hygrometer,


davidg
Good Bye My Friend
Premium,MVM
join:2002-06-15
none

4 recommendations

reply to themagicone
or it could be low iron in your blood, my mother in law freezes at any temp below 80. i say her issue is just because she came here straight from hell and is used to a much hotter environment!
--
Lack of Preparation on YOUR Part does NOT Constitute an Emergency on Mine!

boaterbob
Premium
join:2005-08-01
Moncks Corner, SC
Some 'comments' from a non-technical, non-qualified plain ole everyday person:
How high are the ceilings? We have 12 ft high ceilings in all areas except the bed rooms and baths - the bedrooms are too warm at night. The thermostat is on the living room wall and is set to 72 yet the rooms with the high ceilings feel cold. Yet if I get on a step ladder to change a ceiling lamp I begin to sweat because the heat rises, so, we have the ceiling fans set to 'reverse' to mix the high up warm air with the lower colder air in the rooms - doesn't help much IMO. We do have a ventless gas log fireplace that produce humidity when turned on - this is great except then the thermostat feels the heat and does not turn the heat on thus all the other rooms in the house get colder as no heat is coming thru the vents. Leaving the HAVC fans on all the time helps some.

So I have no explanation, nor any suggestions - well, maybe invite your girlfriend over more often, or do calisthenics (that generates body heat). or 'think warm' - however you do that!


beck
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join:2002-01-29
On The Road
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reply to themagicone
Get a nice micro-plush throw or blanket and put it over your shoulders. Those things keep the heat in! Might feel weird, but they work well. Remember...NICE MICRO-PLUSH, not some cheap crap.
--
Some people are like slinkies - not really good for much.
But they bring a smile to your face when pushed down the stairs.

bkjohnson
Premium
join:2002-05-22
Birmingham, AL
Reviews:
·Charter
I have an electric throw that I really like. It's like a throw-sized electric blanket, and I use it while reading, using the computer, watching TV etc. They sell out in stores here in the fall and early winter, but Wal-Mart and others have them online. Mine is the Sunbeam brand.

themagicone

join:2003-08-13
Osseo, MN
reply to themagicone
Humm... I was thinking a humidifier. I don't really have anywhere to put one out of the way of my dogs. 4 adults, 4 dogs and 1000 sqft doesn't leave much room. Took a warm shower at least I can feel my fingers again.


nunya
LXI 483
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join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:12
Reviews:
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A "whole house" humidifier is usually installed on the furnace and controlled by a humidistat.
I have to ask, are you "old"? I know I go to a lot of old peoples homes and they are the same way. They have the heat up to 80 and walk around with sweaters on.
It very well could be a physical issue such as poor circulation. You might want to bring it up with your Dr.
--
I just might be the most "licensed" S.O.B. you know.


tp0d
yabbazooie
Premium
join:2001-02-13
Carnegie, PA
kudos:6

1 recommendation

get a SNUGGIE!! lol

or try shots of tequila. those always warm me up.

but a hygrometer and a humidifier (cheap at walmart, 25$) is a good plan. better for the lungs too

-j
--
if it aint broke, tweak it!!
currently on FiOS (kick aZZ!)

Ssid Silver

join:2010-11-04
reply to themagicone
Is there anything you could do to seal drafts in the house, e.g. around the doors (weather stripping), windows (that clear plastic shrink wrap used with double sided tape) or maybe an attic entrance? A fireplace can be bad too. The roommate's argument for economy is puzzling since any money saved is by the landlord and not you as tenants. If you can't come to a compromise (75?) then maybe a different roommate is in order.

jfmezei
Premium
join:2007-01-03
Pointe-Claire, QC
kudos:23
As a previous poster said, raising humidity level can help a lot. However, in cold climates, there are limits to this as high humidty from inside may seep through cracks/power outlets and condensate as they reach colder side of the wall and this condensation can cause a lot of damage.

I think 30% relative humidity can be achieve without problems in cold climates. If the building is well insulated and well sealed, then you can increase the level.

You feeling of "cold" may be due to lack of execise or adenaline. Installing a large poster of a bikini clad super model in a suggestive position may warm you up . Or you could install some exercise equipment and find that after regfular exercise you feel much mroe comfortable because your blood has better circulation.

Do you have low blood pressure ? If so, insuficient movement/exercise will get you feeling cold.

Of course, dressing up warmer will also help.

themagicone

join:2003-08-13
Osseo, MN
reply to themagicone
We pay for all the utilities but we are on a budget with the gas company. We pay like $80/month year round, in August we pay the difference or get a credit if we over paid.

I'm not old, only 27. All of freeze its just the ability of the others to deal with being cold (and complain about it) and me who looks for a solution (turning the heat up). Roommate rather freeze than turn the heat up. Can't really seal the house up, can't even get to most windows/doors. I'm looking at a humidifier to see if that will help.

themagicone

join:2003-08-13
Osseo, MN
reply to jfmezei
Can't argue with the needing exercise thing. But with it being really cold (-18 the other day, 1 today) I don't get out much. And come Tuesday I'm having my 3rd back surgery so I'll be having limited mobility again for another 2-5 weeks. Been looking at a gym membership to get some exercise but all the gyms around here are expensive ($50 for Anytime, $60 for lifetime, Snap is $55)


Lurch77
Premium
join:2001-11-22
Oconto, WI
kudos:4
reply to themagicone
Beating a dead horse, but first check the humidity in your home. If there is not sufficient moisture in the air it will start pulling it out of your skin. The moisture evaporating from your skin makes you feel cold. This is also why dry lips and skin is a bigger problem in the winter than summer.
--
With a bike, you could die of exposure on your own schedule and not depend on others. ~ Peter Egan

Ssid Silver

join:2010-11-04
reply to themagicone
I can't picture why you wouldn't be able to get to most of the windows and doors, out of curiosity what do you mean?

scross

join:2002-09-13
Cordova, TN
reply to themagicone
Is there a lot of open (uncovered) glass in the house? Windows without curtains, etc. will bleed a lot of heat out of (and into) the house. It might be time to invest in some quality insulating curtains.

Also, if the walls/ceiling/floor are thin, drafty, and/or poorly insulated then you will get the same effect. Remember that "72 degrees" is a measure of the air temperature; the walls, etc. could be at a considerably different temperature, and as such will absorb/emit relatively large amounts of infrared (heat) energy, which your skin can feel. Floor coverings, wall coverings, and so on can mitigate this quite a bit.

Korro

join:2008-03-15
Pittsburgh, PA
reply to themagicone
I would love to keep my heat at 72. Our house thermo is set at 69 and we are not that cold. We do have a humidifier on our furnace set at 30%.

Exercise and the house will feel HOT. Also another tip: when coming from your car to the house...make sure you turn the heat down a few miles from home....it will make your house feel cold if the heat in your car is hotter.


jack b
Gone Fishing
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-08
Cape Cod
kudos:1

1 edit
reply to themagicone
Scross nailed it. Humidity is only one factor. The air can be relatively warm but if the wall, floor, and ceiling surfaces are cool, you can feel cold. This is because the body heat you generate radiates away more quickly to cooler surfaces than it does to warm ones. Temperature differentials, hot goes to cold. That's why you feel cold.

This is why radiant heat is so comfortable, the room air can be cooler and you will still feel warm from the heated floors.
--
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~Proud Member of Team Discovery ~

jfmezei
Premium
join:2007-01-03
Pointe-Claire, QC
kudos:23
When you take showers, don't run the fan. Once done, leave door opened so the humidity can spread to the rest of your living area. In fact, to save more money, let the bathtub fil as you take a shower and empty it only after the water has cooled to room temperature. Not only does this release the heat you paid for (water heating) back to the house instead of down the drain, but it also helps with humidity as well.

I've found that in winter, the bathroom can dry very quickly because of the heating system. (forced air system).


Savant
Premium
join:2001-08-12
Toronto
reply to themagicone
I would suggest that you get some thermometers. I've found that the thermometers that come with thermostats are wildly inaccurate. Even digital ones.

Case in point, I was asked to check out the thermostat at my step-father's house for his gas fireplace. He couldn't understand why he had to turn his thermostat up to 77 to keep the room warn. So I brought over a thermometer and lo-and-behold it showed the temperature as 70. So he wasn't actually heating the room to 77, he was heating it to 70. I replaced the stat and all was well.

Check the specifications for these thermostats and you may find anywhere from a +/- 2-5 degree accuracy variance. It's possible you may be perceiving the cold since it *IS* cold, and the thermometer you are reading isn't accurate.
--

Could be better, could be worse, could be Monday...

jfmezei
Premium
join:2007-01-03
Pointe-Claire, QC
kudos:23
Location of thermostat is also important. It could mounted in a location which is warmer than the rest of house/appartment.

What type of heating is it ? Forced air ? Electric , water radiators ?

If forced air, is it gas, oil, heat pump ? With a heat pump, when it goes into defrost mode, you can certaintly feel chilly. And in colder temperatures, while the heat pump is still heating the house, the air movement feels cold because the air coming out of the vents is colder than body temperature.

BTW, digital thermostats make a HUGE difference to comfort because they are able to kick the heat in befefore the loss of a full degree. So the temperature is more stable in the house.

Old analogue thermostats end up costing more for heating because of the much larger variations in temperature. (You need to consider the mass inside the house. A bookcase full of heavy books will release heat when room temperature drops, but that bookcase will need to be heated back when you try to heat the house back up.).

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
Does anybody actually read the original post?

said by themagicone:

I've checked the temp with a few thermometers and they all say 72.



Rambo76098

join:2003-02-21
Columbus, OH
Reviews:
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reply to themagicone
Electric blankets take almost nothing compared to HVAC, so your roommate is correct. And budget billing or not, you're still paying for what you use, it's just spread out over all 12 months.

There's no way you should be cold at 72 with a bunch of layers. I'm a naturally cold person (don't like cold weather either!) and I can deal with 4 layers and 68. Are you sick? Low iron?

Again, humidity & plastic on the windows are good suggestions. I did my 80's apartment with them and it made a huge difference, never realized how much cold came off the old windows.

Moving away from MN might be a good idea too

themagicone

join:2003-08-13
Osseo, MN
Trust me - I have plans to move from MN as soon as I can. I can't stand being cold, never have. I've checked the temp with over thermometers all say 72. I have a heated mattress pad on my bed I use at night but my head gets cold. I'm thinking what everyone else has said about the humidity. It's really dry in here so I'm going to try some humidity and see if I feel warmer.


Pacrat
Old and Cranky
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join:2001-03-10
Cortland, OH
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reply to robbin
When I was sill working, I worked in an office of, maybe 20 people, and it never failed that there was always some conflict over whether it was too hot or too cold in the office area. It could be the middle of summer, with the AC going full blast and some idiots were hiding ceramic heaters in the footwells of their desks. Forunately, no one in the office could actually change the thermostat settings. It was set, by Maintenance Eng'g, to 72°F... year round! Some women were "freezing cold" while others were "baking". And no, it wasn't "hot flashes". Even some of the males were commenting on how hot or how cold it was. I kept a button-down sweater in one of my file drawers. Temperature perception/tolerance has a lot to do with each person's metabolism and mood.

I read in this forum, time after time, about folks who set their thermostats in their homes to 68° or less, and are comfortable with that. I, myself, am on the verge of being quite uncomfortable at that temperature. Both my wife and I are quite comfortable at 73 or 74 during the day so that's where we keep it. In the summer, we like to keep the AC about 10 degrees cooler than whatever it is outside. Not only that, but I will admit that even though I consider 68° to be rather cool when I'm inside, I consider that almost balmy when I'm outdoors. Go figure.

I do believe that adding some humidity to the OP's place would help quite a bit. Even a few cake pans of water in the room would add to the humidity and make it more comfortable. Steam from the bathroom shower would also help. I believe I'd try a few of the simple things that have been so far suggested before I'd go whole hog with anything else. My wife has a little "nite-lite" fountain that we run. It has a little pump in it and it causes the water to cascade over some little rocks. The whole thing doesn't stand more than 8" high and is maybe, 8 or 10" in diameter. When it is running in the winter time, we have to fill it back up nearly every day... it holds about a quart of water.

If he can't reach some compromise with his roommates, the only other alternative is find new roommates.
--
Alcohol kills germs! Stay drunk... Stay healthy!

Mr Matt

join:2008-01-29
Eustis, FL
kudos:1
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reply to themagicone
I feel most comfortable with a relative humidity of 50%. You will feel warmer if you keep the relative humidity at 50% +/- 10%. At 60% you will get more condensation on windows. At 40% you will tend to feel colder.

Crescent
Premium
join:2003-01-22
canada
reply to themagicone
I can get crazy cold in the house if it goes down to 74 if I am doing nothing. And even colder if I am sitting doing my least liked thing... paperwork.
I can go outside, when it is near freezing, without a lot of layers, and so long as I am not hungry happily work in the yard all day.

Electric blankets and pads use almost no power to speak of, compared to heating the entire house.
Radiant heat can make you feel warm.
I have a wood stove, and today I let the house temp drop to 72, so decided to go outside to chop some wood to warm up. Yep, I did warm up, with less layers outside than I had on inside the house.


Chemist

@videotron.ca
reply to themagicone
said by themagicone:

What are some suggestions to solve the issue of feeling cold in a house? It's not drafty but I can have the heat on 72-74 and just be freezing. I have 4 layers on now and I'm just shaking.

I'm not a specialist in medicine (but am one in infectious disease), nor a specialist in home engineering. But I will share my knowledge (even though I don't have a picture to upload for being "anon").

What you describe can be a house malfunction somewhere (assuming the thermostat is not correct).

But, I will leave you with this:

The symptoms you describe can be due to an under-active thyroid (not an blood-iron thing as mentioned above). Chills and feeling cold is the classic symptom.

In more advanced cases dry skin and dry hair is also a symptom, as well as personality disorders (anger, memory loss, hypertension, irregular heart beat (fluttering) etc).

If you are sure there is no draft coming in, I would go to a doc and demand a thyroid test. It's a simple run of the mill blood test.

k? Questions?

jfmezei
Premium
join:2007-01-03
Pointe-Claire, QC
kudos:23
reply to themagicone
With regards to head cold when in bed. This is a well known issue. This is why cold weather sllping bags are designed as a "mummy" bag to cover your head and just leave an opening for your face. You should do the same with your blankets. You will find you will sleep much better and feel warmer in bed, end down to your feet because your body will lose much less heat. (head is a big heat sink for the body, unless you have tons of hair).

zen1

join:2010-12-06
reply to themagicone
do you feel cold in a doctor's office? almost always they have the thermostat set to 72F. so if you don't feel cold there, then there's something with your house. perhaps the differential is too wide. did you light a candle and see if the flame moves around? that would be signs of a draft you didn't notice.