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MiB

@towerstream.com

Hate much?

I've never seen so much hatred for our Government agencies that try to protect America and its citizens. So do you all want to be protected from terrorists, la cosa nostra, destructive hackers, etc anymore?
i understand the argument that the Government shouldn't be able to listen in on anyone they want to. but a federal agent really isn't going to spend time listening to your phone call when you call a 1-800 sex line, email your mistress from your secret gmail account, or send a picture of your privates to a co-worker.

Goldman

join:2002-06-21
Maumelle, AR

1 recommendation

It's because we used to have rights in this country. Now we have overlords.

PS: You can love your country and hate your government. It happens all the time.


cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7
reply to MiB
If a federal agent isn't going to take the time to do all that, then why does he backdoors to do so?

If a criminal, terrorist, or movie pirate wants to keep a conversation private or hidden, there are a variety of commercially available encryption techniques that make it very impractical to break. So getting backdoors in to skype really hasn't done anything to stop the flow of communications.

Plus, if the technology allows backdoors, it would only be a matter of time before such backdoors are exploited for nefarious purposes.


Rogue Wolf
Mourns the Loss of lilhurricane

join:2003-08-12
Troy, NY

3 recommendations

reply to MiB
My question is, who protects me from my government?

The worst the terrorists can do is kill me. The government can make me disappear, ship me off to some cement cell in a foreign land, and make my life a living hell for years, just because I went to the wrong place or talked to the wrong person and became a "person of interest" to them. Hell, if they want to, they can just kill me outright if they deem me a "threat", no need for messy judicial involvement.

Hey, but it's easy to avoid that, right? Just don't express my opinion or become politically active (except in "approved" ways), toe the line and keep my head down, and I'll never have to worry about my government taking notice of me and doing bad things to me.

...y'know, that sort of makes it sound like a terrorist organization, doesn't it?
--
Justin Timberlake brought sexy back. I'm putting it away again.

This content may not be retransmitted by your cable company without significant rate increases!

ISurfTooMuch

join:2007-04-23
Tuscaloosa, AL
reply to MiB
said by MiB :

I've never seen so much hatred for our Government agencies that try to protect America and its citizens. So do you all want to be protected from terrorists, la cosa nostra, destructive hackers, etc anymore?
i understand the argument that the Government shouldn't be able to listen in on anyone they want to. but a federal agent really isn't going to spend time listening to your phone call when you call a 1-800 sex line, email your mistress from your secret gmail account, or send a picture of your privates to a co-worker.

If you're making life difficult for the party in power and/or the head of the agency who can do the snooping, you better believe they will.

Go out there and make a serious run for any sufficiently important office, and you'll have a whole army of people trying to dig up dirt on you. Or, if you want to do something more achievable for someone without deep pockets, start a Web site/blog that reports on the abuses and corruption in your local law enforcement agencies. You'll be amazed at the increased number of cops you'll see nearby. But don't worry, since they're just looking out for your well-being. And all those traffic tickets you'll be getting will only serve to make you a safer driver.

old_wiz_60

join:2005-06-03
Bedford, MA
reply to Rogue Wolf
Keep an eye out for a black SUV parked in front of your house. Posting here is dangerous to your health; after all, only terrorists complain.
Expand your moderator at work


Doctor Four
My other vehicle is a TARDIS
Premium
join:2000-09-05
Dallas, TX
reply to Goldman

Re: Hate much?

said by Goldman:

It's because we used to have rights in this country. Now we have overlords.

To paraphrase a meme that's been popular lately, "I for one welcome our new corporate overlords."
--
I, for one, welcome our new Computer Overlords.


COMMAN
Plug Me In

join:2000-07-17
Mount Juliet, TN

1 recommendation

reply to Rogue Wolf
said by Rogue Wolf:

The worst the terrorists can do is kill me. The government can make me disappear, ship me off to some cement cell in a foreign land, and make my life a living hell for years, just because I went to the wrong place or talked to the wrong person and became a "person of interest" to them. Hell, if they want to, they can just kill me outright if they deem me a "threat", no need for messy judicial involvement.

AMEN Brother!! - I'd rather stand up for our constitution and all it means than whimper & curl up in silence like some coward, expecting the government to protect me from all the 'evil terrorists'! (Which they can't stop any more than you or I can. Whether it's a dinosaur outside the cave, the black plague, or someone trying to down a plane, mankind has always faced "terrors" of some kind).

Look around, look at history, and do the research - there are some truly fine people in politics and government service, and there are some money-hungry, power-mongering individuals more evil than ANY gun-toting terrorist in ANY country. I'll take a bullet over tyranny any day. Some people in our government have done a good job of making us all afraid of "the evil terrorists", "the evil aliens", "the evil drugs", "the evil communists", "the evil... " - be MOST afraid of those who always tell you to be afraid, and then get over the fear, and LIVE THIS LIFE, PROUDLY!


dslcreature
Premium
join:2010-07-10
Seattle, WA

1 recommendation

reply to MiB
said by MiB :

I've never seen so much hatred for our Government agencies that try to protect America and its citizens. So do you all want to be protected from terrorists, la cosa nostra, destructive hackers, etc anymore?
i understand the argument that the Government shouldn't be able to listen in on anyone they want to. but a federal agent really isn't going to spend time listening to your phone call when you call a 1-800 sex line, email your mistress from your secret gmail account, or send a picture of your privates to a co-worker.

What makes you think terrorists, destructive hackers and your favorite mafia wars characters will agree to submit to using technology with backdoors attached?

What should the government do? Ban all encryption algorithms? Certify every application that emits a datagram? Resurrect key escrow?

Two mini 16GB SD cards filled with synchronized random thermal noise can give a "hacker" years of secure talk time with their buddies using nothing more than a rudimentary XOR instruction even a 2nd grader can understand...where no government, not even the Borg have any hope of decrypting even a single word of intercepted traffic. You can still always put ears to the ground and target or intercept the person doing the communication.

It is not the attempt to protect. It is about facing reality and recognizing the world of control of information technology they seek is just not practically possible. It is in fact counterproductive and dangerous to public safety to put effort into following fools errands rather than sticking to traditional methods which apply universally to all mediums of communication.

Regarding terrorists... the more we spy on "International" communication the more communication links are built which intentionally do not transit the historically cheapest path (USA)..this erodes USG capability to perform surveillance even when absolutely necessary.


Twaddle

@sbcglobal.net
reply to MiB
Keep on believing that our govt wouldn't do that sort of thing. That's the exact mindset that they are diligently trying to foster. I quit drinking the kool-aid in 1963.

Kearnstd
Space Elf
Premium
join:2002-01-22
Mullica Hill, NJ
kudos:1
reply to MiB
it is possible to Hate the government and love the nation. just like it is possible to hate the two wars but support the men and women of the military.
--
[65 Arcanist]Filan(High Elf) Zone: Broadband Reports


Twaddle

@sbcglobal.net
reply to old_wiz_60
I like your attitude. You are not alone!


TamaraB
Question The Current Paradigm
Premium
join:2000-11-08
Da Bronx
Reviews:
·Optimum Online
·Clearwire Wireless

1 edit
reply to MiB
said by MiB :

.... but a federal agent really isn't going to spend time listening to your phone call when you call a 1-800 sex line, email your mistress from your secret gmail account, or send a picture of your privates to a co-worker.

Their sordid, disgusting history says otherwise! See: COINTELPRO.

COINTELPRO (an acronym for Counter Intelligence Program) was a series of covert, and often illegal, projects conducted by the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) aimed at surveilling, infiltrating, discrediting, and disrupting domestic political organizations.

COINTELPRO tactics included discrediting targets through psychological warfare, planting false reports in the media, smearing through forged letters, harassment, wrongful imprisonment, extralegal violence and assassination. Covert operations under COINTELPRO took place between 1956 and 1971, however the FBI has used covert operations against domestic political groups since its inception.[2] The FBI's stated motivation at the time was "protecting national security, preventing violence, and maintaining the existing social and political order."[3]

FBI records show that 85% of COINTELPRO resources targeted groups and individuals that the FBI deemed "subversive,"[4] including communist and socialist organizations; organizations and individuals associated with the civil rights movement, including Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and others associated with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, and the Congress of Racial Equality and other civil rights organizations; black nationalist groups; the American Indian Movement; a broad range of organizations labeled "New Left", including Students for a Democratic Society and the Weathermen; almost all groups protesting the Vietnam War, as well as individual student demonstrators with no group affiliation; the National Lawyers Guild; organizations and individuals associated with the women's rights movement; nationalist groups such as those seeking "independence for Puerto Rico" and a United Ireland; and additional notable Americans, such as Albert Einstein.
[...]
While COINTELPRO was officially terminated in April 1971, continuing FBI actions indicate that post-COINTELPRO reforms did not succeed in ending COINTELPRO tactics.[43][44][45] Documents released under the FOIA show that the FBI tracked the late Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author David Halberstam for more than two decades.[46]

“Counterterrorism” guidelines implemented during the Reagan administration have been described as allowing a return to COINTELPRO tactics.[47] Some radical groups accuse factional opponents of being FBI informants or assume the FBI is infiltrating the movement.[48]

The FBI improperly opened investigations of American activist groups, even though they were planning nothing more than peaceful civil disobedience, according to a report by the inspector general (IG) of the U.S. Department of Justice. The review by the inspector general was launched in response to complaints by civil liberties groups and members of Congress. The FBI improperly monitored groups including the Thomas Merton Center, a Pittsburgh-based peace group, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), and Greenpeace USA, an environmental activism organization. Also, activists affiliated with Greenpeace were improperly put on a terrorist watch list, even though they were planning no violence or illegal acitivities. The IG report found the "troubling" FBI practices between 2001 and 2006. In some cases, the FBI conducted investigations of people affiliated with activist groups for "factually weak" reasons. Also, the FBI extended investigations of some of the groups "without adequate basis" and improperly kept information about activist groups in its files. The IG report also found that FBI Director Robert Mueller III provided inaccurate congressional testimony about one of the investigations, but this inaccuracy may have been due to his relying on what FBI officials told him.[49]
[...]

They are scum, the enemy, and always have been!

Bob

--
"Remember, remember the fifth of November.
Gunpowder, Treason and Plot.
I see no reason why Gunpowder Treason
Should ever be forgot."

"People should not be afraid of their governments. Governments should be afraid of their people"