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brianiscool

join:2000-08-16
Miami, FL
kudos:1
reply to IPPlanMan

Re: And there you have it...

AT&T owns part of the backbone.


IPPlanMan
Holy Cable Modem Batman

join:2000-09-20
Washington, DC
kudos:1
What backbone?


ArrayList
netbus developer
Premium
join:2005-03-19
Brighton, MA
reply to brianiscool
The government owns the backbone. AT&T only maintains it.


Napsterbater
Meh
Premium,MVM
join:2002-12-28
Milledgeville, GA
said by ArrayList:

The government owns the backbone. AT&T only maintains it.

uh no..


dru

join:2000-09-14
Corona, CA

2 recommendations

reply to ArrayList
You're kidding, right?

There are a number of independent Tier 1 backbones, including XO, Level3, Global Crossing, NTT Verio, Sprint, and many few have even heard of. AT&T and Verizon have both acquired several independent tier 1 networks over the years. AT&T has the original AT&T network, plus SBC, BellSouth, etc, Verizon rolled up MCI, uunet, Genuity, and others over their years.

The openness and competition in the backbone isn't the problem. There is enough competition and independence at the backbone exchanges around the country. Nobody controls the backbone, but that doesn't mean consumers should not be concerned by AT&T's move.

Thanks to corporate welfare and generosity by the FCC, the government owns nothing and controls none of the backbone or last mile access, they gave it away to their favorite sons.

Here IS the problem: 5 companies (AT&T, Verizon, Time Warner, Quest, Comcast) control a huge percentage (90%+ and growing) of broadband connectivity to residences in the US. If those 5 all got together and uniformly implemented metered service or caps, most of America, and companies like Netflix could be screwed overnight (or go back to red envelopes and machines)

Today's news story is right.... these caps are never effective when implemented by one company. But don't be shocked if these guys are conducting summit meetings at a retreat on some Caribbean island as I write this. AT&T may have drawn the short straw to publicly announce caps and metered service on wireline broadband.

Consider that 150/250 gigbytes seems almost insanely generous until you calculate the number of 1 hour HD programs or 2 hour movies it takes to get there.

All of the telcos and cable cos are extremely nervous by the rapid shift from cable and satellite subscription services to streaming internet delivery. Americans are doing something today that the bumbling FCC couldn't achieve - al la carte services and pricing. Services that have no online accessibility like HDNet, Stars, HBO, risk becoming obsolete and in decline. And now you have Netflix, Amazon, and others bypassing their own pay-per-view cash cows via their "unlimited internet" which is usually priced as a loss leader to make bundles look attractive.

Wait until the wall street guys figure this out.

TheGuvnor9

join:2006-06-23
Beverly Hills, CA
Collusion to fix prices in this country (USA) is illegal. I think public perception on this issue is winning. Look what is happening in Canada.


DarkLogix
Texan and Proud
Premium
join:2008-10-23
Baytown, TX
kudos:3

1 recommendation

reply to Napsterbater
the backbone is owned by multiple major ISP's and web sites
their isn't jsut one back bone and its more of a web


ropeguru
Premium
join:2001-01-25
Mechanicsville, VA
reply to ArrayList
Huh?


dru

join:2000-09-14
Corona, CA
reply to DarkLogix
said by DarkLogix:

the backbone is owned by multiple major ISP's and web sites
their isn't jsut one back bone and its more of a web

That is true, but irrelevant. While the internet has lots of competition, broadband access to most homes in America is through one of a handful of companies who are either ILEC (Incumbent telco) or MSO (cable companies).

The FCC has embraced an oligarchy of residential ISPs over true competition. The dupoly of cable vs dsl was deemed enough competition, even though with telcos having monopolized territory, and franchise agreements for cable companies, consumers have no choice in broadband providers other than frick vs frack. Overbuilding is possible, and alternates such as municipal broadband or wireless projects are possible, but almost without exeception, the telcos use every trick in the book (including Astroturf campaigns) to thwart any serious alternative.

There was a lot of discussion recently after Egypt and other countries turned their internet "off - like a switch" and how could that be? Well, when you have a state-owned telco they control nearly all the residents. Sure, there are workaround including international dialup. It's unthinkable that we could have that here in the US, but it is more than theoretically possible for the government to declare an emergency and matter of national security, make a handful of calls (less than 10) and block a given site, service, or technology for 90% of the country within a very short time.


ArrayList
netbus developer
Premium
join:2005-03-19
Brighton, MA
reply to Napsterbater
uh yea. they own the fiber maybe not the routers.


kamm

join:2001-02-14
Brooklyn, NY
reply to brianiscool
said by brianiscool:

AT&T owns part of the backbone.

Just stop it, you clearly don't have a clue about the topic,


Napsterbater
Meh
Premium,MVM
join:2002-12-28
Milledgeville, GA
reply to ArrayList
Again no.

Where are you getting this idea?

qworster

join:2001-11-25
Bryn Mawr, PA
reply to dru
Actually now TWO companies are doing it the biggest cableco and the biggest telco.
And since they operate by region, in some regions you will have the choice of one capped company-or the other capped company.


dru

join:2000-09-14
Corona, CA
said by qworster:

Actually now TWO companies are doing it the biggest cableco and the biggest telco.
And since they operate by region, in some regions you will have the choice of one capped company-or the other capped company.

Absolutely.... and people in those areas have no choice but to live with capped service.

It will be interesting to see how the FCC weighs in on this....but someone in Washinton will claim "yes, competition is alive, people can still rent as many on-demand movies from their cable provider as they want."

OK, so that's $3.99 each vs $10 from Netflix for as many as I want, but I have to watch the meter to make sure I don't hit the cap...... ?!?

Core0000
Premium
join:2008-05-04
Somerset, KY
Reviews:
·Time Warner VOIP
reply to dru
You know what you just said, reminded me so much of Atlas shrugged, in how things went with the multiple train companies at the beginning of the book, that its not even funny. *Sighs*

Verizon is leading the way trying to innovate, and you have all of these other companies that, rather than trying to advance, or bring new services.. they are sticks in the mud just trying to hold on to the old ways... generally speaking.


ITALIAN926

join:2003-08-16
kudos:2
reply to dru
I keep asking this, nobody ever answers. Does anyone know if Netflix pays the film industry any $$ for every download? Seems like the visual Napster.


Chuck kCAR

@teksavvy.com
reply to TheGuvnor9
The opposite is true in Canada. Collusion is the norm, our internet service is worst than almost all the third world countries.