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seaquake
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-23
Millersville, MD

Installing Underground Water Pipe

I'm giving consideration to burying about 120 foot of pipe from the back of my house to an area further out in my yard. The idea is that I can attach a hose to the pipe near the house to supply water to the other end without having to drag the house out that far. Since we have new plants and shrubs it would be a daily chore to drag the hose out and then wind it back up. Leaving it out isn't an option as it would be near our in-ground pool and cause a trip hazard.

My idea is to have quick connects at either end. The one near the house will be for hooking up to the water supply (about 10 feet away) and the other will be at the receiving end to attach a short length of hose. I guess my question comes down to what size pipe should I use? The obvious 2 candidates are 1/2" and 3/4" PVC. Which of those should I use or is there something else I should consider?

I don't plan on keeping the water pipe "pressurized" when it's not in use and I will flush the water out of it in the winter months.



jack b
Gone Fishing
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-08
Cape Cod
kudos:1

PVC pipe is not good buried outdoors, it's too brittle. Your best bet is 1" PE irrigation distribution pipe. They have all sorts of couplings and adapter fittings available.
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stevek1949
We're not in Kansas anymore
Premium
join:2002-11-13
Virginia Beach, VA
reply to seaquake

If the supply pipe size is 3/4, I would not go below 3/4 inch Schedule 40 PVC. If it is 1/2, use 1/2. If you go too large, you will lose pressure, too small and you will lose flow. Make sure that it is below the frost line. Add a couple of ball valves at each end.

Make sure that there is a backflow preventer at the supply end. I am not a plumber, but I have done the same at a former residence. I added a quick disconnect so that I could connect my air compressor to blow the last water out befor the winter.



hortnut
Huh?

join:2005-09-25
PNW
kudos:1
Reviews:
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reply to jack b

said by jack b:

PVC pipe is not good buried outdoors, it's too brittle. Your best bet is 1" PE irrigation distribution pipe. They have all sorts of couplings and adapter fittings available.

Have never heard of that, except if it is the cheap PVC.

I have all sorts of PVC buried, Schedule 40, 1 inch, 1 1/2 inch and more. Loaded semi's go over it, equipment and more. Most was first buried in 1984. Most is at 2 feet depth or so for Pac NW climate.

In some 100 ft long greenhouses, the PVC sprinkler lines are above ground, so we can move them out. Again some of these were put in place between 1985 and 1992.

Only problem I have had is where joints have given way. Usually there were improperly glued by me when in a hurry, but they have just been a handful.

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
reply to stevek1949

said by stevek1949:

If the supply pipe size is 3/4, I would not go below 3/4 inch Schedule 40 PVC. If it is 1/2, use 1/2. If you go too large, you will lose pressure, too small and you will lose flow.

Naw -- won't loose any pressure if the hose the OP connects to the far end is the same size or smaller than the one feeding the line.


tschmidt
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-12
Milford, NH
kudos:9
Reviews:
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reply to seaquake

I located a hose faucet in our lawn about 100 feet in front of the house. I used some left over ABS flexible pipe we used to installed the well pump.

I was able to run it into the house low in the basement so draining it it for winter is easy.

/tom



Ken
Premium,MVM
join:2003-06-16
Markle, IN
reply to jack b

said by jack b:

PVC pipe is not good buried outdoors, it's too brittle.

Do you realize how many millions of homes in this country have pvc sewer pipes buried underground. Even septic systems use pvc pipe.


tschmidt
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-12
Milford, NH
kudos:9
Reviews:
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reply to jack b

said by jack b:

PVC pipe is not good buried outdoors, it's too brittle.

Interesting, almost all sewer pipe out here is schedule 40 PVC.

Water is typically flexible ABS. Makes it much easier to get around the many rocks here in Southern NE.

/tom


49528867
Premium
join:2010-04-16
Fort Lauderdale, FL
kudos:3
reply to jack b

said by jack b:

PVC pipe is not good buried outdoors, it's too brittle. Your best bet is 1" PE irrigation distribution pipe. They have all sorts of couplings and adapter fittings available.

Thats bullcrap, pvc works just fine underground.

Wayne
--
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Joyce Kaufman July 3, 2010


ArgMeMatey

join:2001-08-09
Milwaukee, WI
kudos:2
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reply to seaquake

I have about 200 feet of NSF-160 PSI 1" and 3/4" PE buried throughout my yard, which has clay subsoil. Trenched in when I did a drainage project. I blow it out for the winter using my shopvac. It's been working fine since about 2004. I have all brass fittings from the well dept. at the big box.

I also have about 30 feet of buried 3/4" galvanized which is probably 80 years old. Drains seasonally by gravity to the basement.

PE is a no-brainer for my subsoil, because you just put it in the trench and fill in on top of it, no underground joints to cement. But, if there were sharp rocks I might go with something else.

Check local codes to see if PVC is permitted for potable water and to determine backflow protection requirements. Here hose-connection vacuum breakers (HCVB) are OK but I am thinking about upgrading to a pressure vacuum breaker one of these years. If you are using irrigation-grade PE you may be required to have a vacuum breaker or double check inline with the potable connection.
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bobby b

@mindspring.com
reply to 49528867

"Thats bullcrap, pvc works just fine underground."

I've always been told to avoid burying consumer-grade sc40 pvc. My 'burb's inspectors typically won't allow it

Problem is, Joe Homeowner digs a trench - by hand - and digs down to exactly the depth at which he wants to place his pipe. Rocks can lurk directly below, and with normal settling you'll have rocks punching holes in the bottom of your pipe is no time.

A contractor - a decent one, I mean - digs down a bit further, cleans out rocks and lays in a more appropriate underfill before dropping the pipe into the trench, thus drastically lessening chances that a rock will stress the pipe.

But it IS too brittle to handle being hung up on the corner of a rock underneath it.



nunya
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:12

Could you be thinking of CPVC? CPVC is garbage.


Kearnstd
Space Elf
Premium
join:2002-01-22
Mullica Hill, NJ
kudos:1
reply to seaquake

if you bury deep enough you do not even need to drain for winter, they even make special hose faucets for this application that are on the end of a really long pipe and the valve itself is down at the far end.

»www.acehardwaresuperstore.com/ya···186.html
there it is, but thats not a weekend warrior install with that kind of bury depth.



seaquake
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-23
Millersville, MD
reply to seaquake

We have sandy soil so rocks will not be a problem. I've dug in many various places in the yard and it's hard to even find pebbles.

The source faucet that I am attaching to has a backflow preventer in it so I believe that will take care of that requirement. The extension will only be hooked up an hour or two at a time and there will be water flowing through it during the duration. When we're done, we'll disconnect from the source and it'll sit there unpressurized. I'll be hooking up to the line with a standard outdoor hose on both ends

I need to take a trip to the big box store and see what kind of materials they have. Thanks for the ideas, tips and experience, folks.



pipes

@myvzw.com

PE is a good choice since it's quite durable and usually won't burst if exposed to *some* freezing temps while filled. It's also UV stable and available in long lengths. No buried fittings.

Schedule 40 PVC is okay but can get brittle with exposure to UV. It's much more prone to failure if exposed to freezing temps while filled than PE. Most supply houses carry 20' sections to minimize fittings. If you use PVC be sure it's pressure rated and not simply DWV. I've not seen any cellular core PVC in sizes under 1 1/2" but that's not to say it's doesn't exist. There are thin wall versions of smaller diameter PVC which are rated for pressure but aren't at all durable, especially underground.

Schedule 80 PVC is much more UV stable and rated for much higher pressure. Along with a higher degree of durability, comes a much higher price tag.

IMHO, PE would be best for the application.



seaquake
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-23
Millersville, MD
reply to seaquake

Going with PE pipe, are we talking about something like this? »www.google.com/products/catalog?···CBMQ8wI#

I've never worked with PE so I have zero knowledge on how it works. Are fittings and junctions as easy to install as they are with PVC?


Zach1
Premium
join:2006-11-26
NW Minnesota

Yes Sir, that's the stuff. I've seen some use barb fittings and clamps but I prefer the type of fitting linked below:

»www.aymcdonald.com/en-US/4753-ct···ing.html

You'll probably need to hit up a plumbing supply house or buy online. Most PE pipe for standard water service is CTS but there is also IPS (O. D. controlled for geothermal applications where socket fusion is the norm) and SIDR (I. D. controlled for larger waterworks applications). Most supply houses should have 300' coils of CTS 3/4" PE. You'll have some left over but it eliminates underground fittings which are likely just as costly as the extra pipe.


robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
reply to seaquake

I think the easiest thing to do for this would be to just buy some of the Sears Craftsman rubber garden hose. It holds up very well. Just bury it slightly below the surface and you can always remove it to reuse somewhere else. It has a lifetime guarantee. I have used it for years and years and it is very durable. Make sure it is the black, all rubber hose they sell and not any of their other hoses. If you watch the sales, they have it at a good sale price on a regular basis. Their site isn't letting me post a link directly to the hose showing the sale price, but it appears that all lengths are currently on sale (100' for $43.19).

»www.sears.com/shc/s/c_10153_1260···rinklers



pro7070
BJ "The Prodigy" Penn
Premium
join:2002-06-28
Inman, SC
kudos:1
reply to seaquake

I did the same thing a few years back for my dogs.

Whether you use polyethylene or pvc it doesn't matter. For the DIY PVC is probably more goof proof. PE needs to be heated up slighty to allow the fitting to slide in and hose clamp to "bite" correctly. 3/4" is the size you want. The troubleshooting difference between the 2 pipe is when pvc freezes and bursts it will shatter in several places and PE will swell up in a spot and bust. PE would be easier to fix if that ever happened (less area to dig up). If you bury your pipe at the correct depth that should be an issue though.

I'd do it the right way and bury a frost proof standpipe »www.amazon.com/Watersource-Frost···009XB4VM
and that way you wouldn't have to worry about flushing the line out or freezing during the winter. Also you could still use it in the winter if you needed to.