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ricon

@comcast.net
reply to mikedz4

Re: [DVR] Spectrum Quad Tuner DVR revealed

Denver will get it in June


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:17
said by chadb97:

Will the guide that comes with this spectrum box be rolled out to the motorola boxes in the field, or will the new hd guide only be on the spectrum box?

said by cypherstream:

I think initially this needs the Intel CE3100/4100 series processor, which will be in the Spectrum box (manufactured by Pace).

Though the Broadcom BCM7400 series CPU does support HD graphics, as I believe at least one of my DirecTV boxes uses this CPU and I have an HD-GUI. Also the newer Motorola Verizon Fios set tops use this CPU and IMG 1.9 has a 16:9 HD GUI.

An article today about Intel launching the CE5300 SoC, which "more than doubles the [central processing unit] performance" of the CE4200 that is used in the Pace set-top for Xfinity's X1 service:

Intel Plucks 'Berryville' Chip For Set-Tops, Gateways
Silicon Supplier Aims at Broadcom With New 32-Nanometer CE5300 Processor
Multichannel News - March 19, 2012
»www.multichannel.com/article/482 ··· ways.php

"Intel, claiming to leapfrog the performance of chips currently shipping from Broadcom, is launching its fourth-generation system-on-chip for set-tops and media gateways that provides rich graphics comparable to a PlayStation3.

The Intel Atom CE5300, previously code-named "Berryville," is the chip maker's first 32-nanometer SoC, featuring a dual core with hyperthreading and virtualization, an advanced 3D/2D graphics engine, integrated power management, and an H.264 hardware encoder.

Keith Wehmeyer, general manager for Intel's set-top box platforms group, says the Berryville processor -- which is available in quantity today -- delivers 30% to 40% better performance compared with Broadcom's most recently announced SoC solutions.

"We've more than doubled the [central processing unit] performance with the CE5300," he said. "Today's set-top boxes are probably the most underperforming devices in the home."

Initial testing by Intel indicates the chip delivers performance comparable to a PlayStation3 game console, Wehmeyer added.
:
Operators including Comcast, France's Free, Liberty Global's UPC, Numericable and Telecom Italia have announced or launched products on Intel silicon. Comcast, for example, is gearing up for a launch in 2012 of the Xfinity X1 service, which uses a Pace set-top with Intel's CE4200 processor (known as "Groveland").

The more powerful CE5300 enables new applications, such as gesture controls, high-performance gaming, two-way videoconferencing and "sync-and-go" video transcoding for viewing on tablets or other mobile devices.

Intel's forthcoming Puma 6 chip, which provides DOCSIS 3.0 support for up to 1 Gigabit per second of bandwidth and up to six MPEG tuners, will be sampling later this year. The Puma 6, combined with the CE5300, is aimed at "headed" gateway solutions. Intel acquired the Puma line of DOCSIS silicon from Texas Instruments in 2010."


mikedz4

join:2003-04-14
Weirton, WV
reply to ricon
maybe comcast will make me eat crow. Probably around the time I get ready to install directv at my apartment comcast will launch this service here.


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:17
reply to telcodad
Also an article about the new CE5300 chip on the Light Reading Cable site:

Intel's New Set-Top Chip Packs More Punch
Light Reading Cable - March 19, 2012
»www.lightreading.com/document.as ··· r_cable&

"Formally named the CE5300, the chipset is Intel's first media processor built on 32nm technology (its earlier CE4100/Sodaville and CE4200/Groveland processors used 45nm) and a dual-core processor, allowing Intel to more than double performance and beef up a 2-D/3-D graphics engine that can support some advanced gaming and videoconferencing applications.
:
A feature called hyperthreading lets the 5300 support four simultaneous sequences/programs, Wehmeyer says. An H.264 B-picture hardware encoder allows the gateway to stream video to other devices on the home network, such as a tablet or another TV, at a lower bit rate without affecting video quality.

On the cable front, Intel initially plans to integrate the CE5300 with the Puma 5, a Docsis 3.0 chipset acquired from Texas Instruments Inc.

Wehmeyer says the 5300 is ready for high-volume manufacturing. Intel is demonstrating the chipset at this week's IP&TV World Forum in London."


cypherstream
Premium,MVM
join:2004-12-02
Reading, PA
kudos:3
Reviews:
·ProLog
reply to telcodad
said by telcodad:

"Today's set-top boxes are probably the most underperforming devices in the home"

FINALLY someone gets it! I've only been saying this for years.

Now let's see this landscape change before I smudge my puma.

ComcastTech

join:2008-05-31
Hey you watch your mouth! lol. Actually the new RNG200's that I have aren't that slow.

said by cypherstream:

said by telcodad:

"Today's set-top boxes are probably the most underperforming devices in the home"

FINALLY someone gets it! I've only been saying this for years.

Now let's see this landscape change before I smudge my puma.


SpHeRe31459
Premium
join:2002-10-09
Sacramento, CA
kudos:2
reply to cypherstream
So do we know the current status of the disabled fourth tuner, has it been enabled yet for the testers?

Also is there any further word on this being AnyRoom DVR enabled? It would be asinine to not enable it since it has four tuners.


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:17
reply to cypherstream
Here is a blog item from the Multichannel News site explaining Comcast's "Reference Development Kit" (RDK) methodology for developing chips for new TV services like "X1":

A New Path to Moving Faster: Comcast’s ‘RDK’
By Leslie Ellis, Technology Analyst
Multichannel News - March 26, 2012
»www.multichannel.com/blog/Transl ··· RDK_.php


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:17
reply to cypherstream
OK, now it looks like Comcast has a new model, the "X3":

Comcast Sizes Up All-IP Set-Top
By Jeff Baumgartner, Light Reading Cable - April 4, 2012
»www.lightreading.com/document.as ··· r_cable&

An excerpt:

"Comcast Corp. has its first all-IP set-top box on the roadmap, Light Reading Cable has learned.

Industry sources say the model, referred to as the X3, is an IP-based, HD client device that's capable of running Comcast's new cloud-based navigation system and handling future services, including a network DVR.

The box appears to be the latest device tagged for Xcalibur, Comcast's next-gen video platform. The first product to come out of that project is the Pace plc -made X1, a hybrid QAM/IP video gateway equipped to support the MSO's new navigation system while opening the door to third-party applications such as Pandora Media Inc. and Facebook . Comcast is testing the X1 in Augusta, Ga., though sources say the MSO expects to start expanding those tests into at least one more market by May. (See Comcast to Swing Xcalibur Wide in 2012 »www.lightreading.com/document.as ··· lr_cable )

How the X3 will source linear and on-demand video in the early going was not immediately known. However, its appearance on the roadmap suggests that Comcast may be pursuing the deployment of an IP video simulcast. While the amount of bandwidth required for that seems to vary, cable engineers have indicated recently that an MSO might need to carve out 24 to 32 channels to produce a full IP simulcast. Comcast is already in the process of reclaiming all of its analog spectrum to apply toward HD programming and new services like Xcalibur. (See MSOs Must Bust Out Bandwidth for IP Video Leap »www.lightreading.com/document.as ··· lr_cable and Comcast Starts to Kiss Analog TV Goodbye »www.lightreading.com/document.as ··· lr_cable )

If the X3 is compatible with a future version of the X1 that includes real-time video transcoding, it's also been suggested that the X1 gateway could convert incoming QAM video into IP and shuttle those streams to the X3 using Multimedia over Coax Alliance (MoCA) .
:
But a pairing of the X1 and X3 isn't expected to happen for a while. An industry source says the first multi-room DVR implementation involving the X1 will team the hybrid device with the RNG150, an all-digital HD client box from Motorola Mobility Inc. (NYSE: MMI), with trials expected late this year.
:
It's not clear when Comcast will introduce the X3, though it's not expected until late 2012 or sometime next year."


mikedz4

join:2003-04-14
Weirton, WV
so is the x3 the one that will be widely deployed or the x1?


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:17
said by mikedz4:

so is the x3 the one that will be widely deployed or the x1?

Well, according to that article, it sounds like the X3 may be like an AnyRoom client box that will pair-up with a "gateway" STB or an AnyRoom DVR, using MoCA.:

"Industry sources say the model, referred to as the X3, is an IP-based, HD client device that's capable of running Comcast's new cloud-based navigation system and handling future services, including a network DVR.
:
If the X3 is compatible with a future version of the X1 that includes real-time video transcoding, it's also been suggested that the X1 gateway could convert incoming QAM video into IP and shuttle those streams to the X3 using Multimedia over Coax Alliance (MoCA) .
:
But a pairing of the X1 and X3 isn't expected to happen for a while. An industry source says the first multi-room DVR implementation involving the X1 will team the hybrid device with the RNG150, an all-digital HD client box from Motorola Mobility Inc., with trials expected late this year.
:
It's not clear when Comcast will introduce the X3, though it's not expected until late 2012 or sometime next year."

So I would expect that the X1 will be widely deployed first.


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:17

2 edits
reply to telcodad
Jeff Baumgartner, the author of the article, has added this info in the Comments area:

"Comcast declined to comment on the X3, by the way. But a person with some knowledge of the project says this is potentially an ARM-based device, so it will likely be a less power-hungry set-top and fit into cable's new long-term view on how to reduce power consumption. And ARM, I'm told, may also give Comcast some help in the development area, since that kind of architecture is being used in cell phones, tablets, and streaming boxes like the Roku."

and:

"I was reminded that IP video isn't broadcast so the term simulcast in this sense may not be the best description... and to think about this in terms of switched digital video "without all the muss and fuss." Make me recall that BigBand (now part of Arris, which happens to do alot of work with Comcast) did envision SDV as being a stepping stone to IP video »www.lightreading.com/document.as ··· lr_cable . But the reminder brings a lot more questions to mind on *how* Comcast might accomplish this. JB"

and some more:

"From: Mari Silbey - Since Comcast is already using the Motorola Televation streamer thingy (aka AnyPlay), it could avoid doing a large amount of simulcast (or whatever you want to call it), and instead transcode to IP for access on connected devices like iPads in addition to cheaper all-IP set-tops. I wouldn't necessarily have bet on Comcast picking up a transcoding device like the Motorola streamer, but since it has, the introduction of all-IP set-tops makes a lot of sense. They're cheaper, greener, and can be easily networked with other IP devices."

"Yeah, that possibility crossed my mind too but I wonder how the lack of transactional VoD on the AnyPlay (for now, anyway) would affect that sort of a set-up. Also I'd be curious to know if this IP client device would have WiFi in there to support AnyPlay. But that kind of setup would give the mpeg pipe more legs during the IP video transition, which will take a looong time considering how many millions of MPEG-only set-tops are out there. JB"

"From: Mari Silbey - Could users still stream free VoD with AnyPlay? If the issue is just paid on-demand content, Comcast (and users) might be willing to let that reside solely on a parent box in the house short-term. Hmmm..."

"I take that back. Took a quick look back when they launched AnyPlay in Denver and Nashville, and we reported then (»www.lightreading.com/document.as ··· lr_cable) there's no VoD supported yet on that streaming unit, transcactional or otherwise. I must've been thinking about something else, but now I can't put my finger on it JB"

"From: Mari Silbey - Well that does limit things somewhat. Interesting then that Comcast is pursuing both in-home transcoding and straight-up IP set-tops. Guess they have to cover all their bases given the increasingly hybrid landscape."

"Also, as I have more discussions on this, it appears more and more likely that this box will feed off a gateway, perhaps whatever follows the current version of the X1, so it's still hard to see how soon we can expect to see some sort of an IP video simulcast (guess i'll keep using that term until we can come up with something better). So the transcoding idea could have more weight versus that other option. JB"

Edit: Added second comment
Edit2: Added later comments


mikedz4

join:2003-04-14
Weirton, WV
so will this x1 be available this summer or fall?

Russ6

join:2011-03-17
Houston, TX
kudos:1
said by mikedz4:

so will this x1 be available this summer or fall?

The article at Light Reading Cable says:
quote:
Comcast is testing the X1 in Augusta, Ga., though sources say the MSO expects to start expanding those tests into at least one more market by May.
It will depend on how those tests go before X1 is deployed widely.
--
SA 8300 HD DVRs with Patched S25 Guide
Links:
'S25 Guide Blog' 'Schedule' 'Info' 'Patch Thread'


mikedz4

join:2003-04-14
Weirton, WV
here's hoping that market is the pittsburgh region so I can try it.


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:17
reply to telcodad
Mari Silbey, in her article today on the FierceCable site about Comcast's plans for all-IP set-top box - the "X3," also gives a nice summary about Comcast's many other IP initiatives that are also in the works:

Comcast plans the X3, its first all-IP HD set-top
By Mari Silbey, FierceCable - April 5, 2012
»www.fiercecable.com/story/comcas ··· 12-04-05

Russ6

join:2011-03-17
Houston, TX
kudos:1
Inside the Comcast RDK, Part Two

by Leslie Ellis
MultiChannel News
April 9, 2012

This week’s Translation steps further into the parts of the Comcast “RDK” (reference development kit), the software effort aimed at shaving a year off the time it takes to launch new cable gateways, hybrid set-tops and all-Internet protocol hardware and services.

Quick refresher: RDK is a bundle of software drivers and source code that gets preloaded into chips so manufacturers can develop product more quickly. That means apps, services and everything related goes more quickly. Quickly is the goal of RDK.

In essence, the RDK outlines a “now-and- next” list of software items, where “now” means what’s in today’s digital set-tops: A CableLabs “Reference Implementation” (RI) for OCAP and Tru2way, a Java Virtual Machine (JVM), a video proxy, media streamer and DTCP (Digital Transmission Copy Protection), for security.

The “next” parts of the RDK come from the IP (Internet-protocol) side of the world.

Recall that a huge driver for the RDK is to tap into the larger world of Internet developers instead of building complicated, cable-specific stuff.

For brevity, we’ll sidestep the familiar, “how things are now” components, which this column has covered every which way over the past decade.

Let’s look instead at the new stuff: Gstreamer, QT and webkit. We’ll start with “QT,” which people tend to say as a word: Cute. (No, really.) QT is a “windowing framework,” meaning it’s the traffic cop for everything that wants to get onto a screen.

And because nearly everything in software happens in stacks, the next one up in RDK is “webkit,” a browsing framework used under the hood of Safari, Chrome, and mobile environments like iOS (Apple) and Android (Google).

Including a browsing framework, notably, isn’t the equivalent of Internet browsing on TV. Rather, a browser framework knows how to do things like render HTML, parse incoming markup languages and access specific media types — so that a browser, as we know it, could work on top of it.

Then there’s Gstreamer — and here comes that “framework” again, this time for video. It’s what’s underneath the processing or raw audio and video files, so that they play out as intended. Handily, it’s a framework that plugs into multiple types of digital rights management (DRM).

In the olden days of right now, most of these activities are done on proprietary silicon that works differently, one chip vendor to the next. RDK exists to change that.

»www.multichannel.com/blog/Transl ··· _Two.php

NOTE: The following is a link to his original blog entry about Comcast's RDK, posted earlier in this thread:
»www.multichannel.com/blog/Transl ··· RDK_.php
--
SA 8300 HD DVRs with Patched S25 Guide
Links:
'S25 Guide Blog' 'Schedule' 'Info' 'Patch Thread'


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:17

1 edit
reply to telcodad
Here's an item from today's cable news roundup article on the Light Reading Cable site:

Comcast Takes IP Video Back to School
By Jeff Baumgartner, Light Reading Cable - April 10, 2012
»www.lightreading.com/document.as ··· lr_cable

"Comcast will use the Massachusetts Institute of Technology campus to test a new IP video delivery system this fall, reports The Wall Street Journal, noting that the trial will let students watch live TV on PCs or broadband-connected TVs via the campus network. The paper says the MSO could expand the trial to Comcast employees later in the year. There's no word on when Comcast might deploy the new platform commercially, but Light Reading Cable reported last week that the MSO has an IP-only set-top box/client on the roadmap called the X3. In the meantime, Comcast is testing a hybrid gateway called the X1 that relies on QAM for traditional video services and an IP connection to feed the device's cloud-based guide and integrated Web apps such as Facebook . (See Comcast Sizes Up All-IP Set-Top »www.lightreading.com/document.as ··· lr_cable and Comcast IDs Cloud TV Product as 'X1' »www.lightreading.com/document.as ··· lr_cable .)"

Edit: A link to the Wall Street Journal artice on this:

Comcast Tests Same Technology Used by Online-Video Rivals
»professional.wsj.com/article/SB1 ··· 642.html

From an article insert:

"Trading the Set-Top Box for the Internet Age

A Juiced-Up Program Guide .. Would Be Just One of the Changes

With Comcast's current system:
- To watch live TV, viewers must have a set-top box.
- Live TV delivery system isn't compatible with Internet devices such as Xbox game consoles and computers.
- Program guide is stored inside each set-top box and offers limited features.

In the future:
- Consumers could watch live TV without a set-top box.
- Consumers could access live programming on Web-capable devices, such as tablets.
- Program guide is stored on remote services (as above), allowing for additional features like connections to social media and Web-video services.


caster 665

@dsl.net
sounds cool but will it go any where as over the past few years they have shown off lot's of cool stuff that did not go any where or only stay in the testing area. Why not just go all VID and let others do the UI and boxes at the tv parts?

The Q

join:2008-06-26
Collegeville, PA
reply to Russ6
said by Russ6:

Inside the Comcast RDK, Part Two

by Leslie Ellis
MultiChannel News
April 9, 2012

NOTE: The following is a link to his original blog entry about Comcast's RDK, posted earlier in this thread:
»www.multichannel.com/blog/Transl ··· RDK_.php

FYI only - Leslie Ellis is a she...»www.translation-please.com/


mikedz4

join:2003-04-14
Weirton, WV
reply to telcodad
I wish they would get off their dead butts and move forward with this. It's getting old that we are left behind here in the pittsburgh area.
Just because we are motorola we are second class citizens now.

Russ6

join:2011-03-17
Houston, TX
kudos:1
reply to telcodad
After reading the Wall Street Journal article "Comcast Tests Same Technology Used by Online-Video Rivals" by JESSICA E. VASCELLARO, it became clear to me that the test at MIT is not the X1 (Xfinity Spectrum DVR) or X3. Instead, it delivers live TV service to any device that can connect to the Internet. The following excerpt by Comcast's president of converged products Sam Schwartz does apply to X1 (Xfinity Spectrum DVR):

quote:
The Augusta trial will be expanded to other markets and the service will be rolled out next year, according to Mr. Schwartz.
said by telcodad:

Here's an item from today's cable news roundup article on the Light Reading Cable site:

Comcast Takes IP Video Back to School
By Jeff Baumgartner, Light Reading Cable - April 10, 2012
»www.lightreading.com/document.as ··· lr_cable

"Comcast will use the Massachusetts Institute of Technology campus to test a new IP video delivery system this fall, reports The Wall Street Journal, noting that the trial will let students watch live TV on PCs or broadband-connected TVs via the campus network. The paper says the MSO could expand the trial to Comcast employees later in the year. There's no word on when Comcast might deploy the new platform commercially, but Light Reading Cable reported last week that the MSO has an IP-only set-top box/client on the roadmap called the X3. In the meantime, Comcast is testing a hybrid gateway called the X1 that relies on QAM for traditional video services and an IP connection to feed the device's cloud-based guide and integrated Web apps such as Facebook . (See Comcast Sizes Up All-IP Set-Top »www.lightreading.com/document.as ··· lr_cable and Comcast IDs Cloud TV Product as 'X1' »www.lightreading.com/document.as ··· lr_cable .)"

Edit: A link to the Wall Street Journal artice on this:

Comcast Tests Same Technology Used by Online-Video Rivals
»professional.wsj.com/article/SB1 ··· 642.html

From an article insert:

"Trading the Set-Top Box for the Internet Age

A Juiced-Up Program Guide .. Would Be Just One of the Changes

With Comcast's current system:
- To watch live TV, viewers must have a set-top box.
- Live TV delivery system isn't compatible with Internet devices such as Xbox game consoles and computers.
- Program guide is stored inside each set-top box and offers limited features.

In the future:
- Consumers could watch live TV without a set-top box.
- Consumers could access live programming on Web-capable devices, such as tablets.
- Program guide is stored on remote services (as above), allowing for additional features like connections to social media and Web-video services.


--
SA 8300 HD DVRs with Patched S25 Guide
Links:
'S25 Guide Blog' 'Schedule' 'Info' 'Patch Thread'


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:17

2 edits
said by Russ6:

After reading the Wall Street Journal article "Comcast Tests Same Technology Used by Online-Video Rivals" by JESSICA E. VASCELLARO, it became clear to me that the test at MIT is not the X1 (Xfinity Spectrum DVR) or X3. Instead, it delivers live TV service to any device that can connect to the Internet. The following excerpt by Comcast's president of converged products Sam Schwartz does apply to X1 (Xfinity Spectrum DVR):

quote:
The Augusta trial will be expanded to other markets and the service will be rolled out next year, according to Mr. Schwartz.

I don't know, Russ, while it's definitely not the X1 (aka "Xfinity Spectrum DVR" or the "Parker box"), it does sound a lot like the description given of the mysterious X3 box in the Light Reading Cable article (»www.lightreading.com/document.as ··· _cable):

"[Comcast] has its first first all-IP set-top box on the roadmap, Light Reading Cable has learned.
:
Industry sources say the model, referred to as the X3, is an IP-based, HD client device that's capable of running Comcast's new cloud-based navigation system and handling future services, including a network DVR.
:
How the X3 will source linear and on-demand video in the early going was not immediately known. However, its appearance on the roadmap suggests that Comcast may be pursuing the deployment of an IP video simulcast.
:
It's not clear when Comcast will introduce the X3, though it's not expected until late 2012 or sometime next year."

For the MIT device, it's said that:

"The company will expand testing to Comcast employees later this year, allowing them to watch live programming via a small box or another device that can connect to the Internet like a computer, tablet or Microsoft Corp.'s Xbox gaming console in their homes."

So, it sounds to me like MIT is the X3 testbed, with the Comcast employees doing the "expanded testing ... later this year," in preparation for introducing it in "late 2012 or sometime next year."

The only other possibility is that it is the, undisclosed-until-now, "X2" box?

Russ6

join:2011-03-17
Houston, TX
kudos:1
An Excerpt from the Wall Street Journal article "Comcast Tests Same Technology Used by Online-Video Rivals" by JESSICA E. VASCELLARO,

quote:
Comcast will start testing its new video-delivery technology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology this fall, according to a person familiar with the matter, allowing students to watch live TV on a computer or TV that can connect to the Internet over the local campus network, without a cable-hook up. A spokesman for MIT declined to comment.

The company will expand testing to Comcast employees later this year, allowing them to watch live programming via a small box or another device that can connect to the Internet like a computer, tablet or Microsoft Corp.'s Xbox gaming console in their homes. If the test is deemed a success, Comcast says the all IP-video system would eventually be added to its existing suite of services; it will continue to offer its traditional cable service for the foreseeable future.
It is difficult to tell exactly what is required. It sounds like, if you want to display the video on a computer you don't need any additional device. If you want to display the video on a TV, you would need an additional device. The additional device could be the X3 or maybe a media extender, such as a Xbox.
--
SA 8300 HD DVRs with Patched S25 Guide
Links:
'S25 Guide Blog' 'Schedule' 'Info' 'Patch Thread'


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:17
Karl Bode has a link to his DSLR news item (»Comcast Tests IP Set Top at MIT) on the MIT "all-IP STB" test (and ID'ed as the "X3") in the Comcast HSI forum this morning: »[NEWS] Comcast Tests IP Set Top at MIT


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:17
reply to telcodad
Just received this schedule for the X1 (Xcalibur platform) roll-out from someone that's supposed to be involved with the project (not sure how reliable this might be, though):

Greater Boston area on May 1 (RNG-150 on June 30)
Atlanta and Chattanooga on July 31
Denver on August 15
Beltway and Freedom Region areas on September 11

We'll have to see if these dates actually do hold up, or will be slipped as usual.


mikedz4

join:2003-04-14
Weirton, WV
any news on pennsylvania like central and western?
Keystone is the region.


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:17

1 recommendation

said by mikedz4:

any news on pennsylvania like central and western?
Keystone is the region.

No, sorry mikedz4, that's all the info I got so far.

TiredRetired

join:2012-04-11
East Montpelier, VT

2 edits
reply to telcodad
Hello all. My first post here. I have been running a Cisco RNG200 DVR and a 1TB external drive via esata for 13 months now. Comcast in Vermont.

Since I have had the 200 I have been experiencing audio issues, freeze ups and random reboots with my box that Comcast has been unable to rectify. They keep promising fixes but they never come. They keep promising upgrades to my service but it never comes. World of More promised a year and a half ago and nothing. Is World of More something they even do anymore or have they bailed on that as well?

Now I see all this talk about these new boxes but will they ever come or is all this just more hyperbole? I see in a previous post that Comcast is continuing to test the X1 one city at a time basically every other month. Really? At the rate when will it ever be ready for mass distribution? Will it be ready before it is even obsolete? I want to stay with my triple play package as i really like the telephone and Internet but I look at what the competition is offering and Comcast is light years behind. It seems they are always testing and never deploying.

Sorry for the cynical post but my frustration meter with Comcast is pegging 10 right now. The money I give them each month most likely makes me the dumb one I guess.

Is there any hope in my lifetime (I am 63) that a SA/Cisco area of Comcast will ever see anything that approaches modern technology or am I living in la-la land?

gt1racer

join:2008-11-19
Fall River, MA
reply to cypherstream
Hopefully the Greater Boston area includes Southeastern Mass.