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atnozm
Premium
join:2006-02-03
Schenectady, NY

[Help] 2005 5.4 Ford F150 oil change

I recently bought a 2005 5.4L Ford F150. I am about to do its first oil change on it and noticed that in the manual it says to use 5W-20. This surprised me, I've never used 5W-20 in my life. Now I know if the manufacturer says to use it it should be ok but to be honest the idea of using 5-20 makes me uncomfortable.

My dad suggested using 15W-40 which seems a little excessive to me. Would there be any negative consequences to using 5W-30 (other than potentially a SLIGHT decrease in mileage)?


hortnut
Huh?

join:2005-09-25
PNW
kudos:1
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I have a 2002 with the 5.4L - I would go with the manufacture's recommendation. I am using Synthetic 5w-20.

I do not like changing things up too much, as this engine has a reputation of spitting out spark plugs for certain model years. »www.mycarstats.com/

There are a bunch of F150 Forums out there to check out.


south1178
Premium
join:2001-12-17
Cleveland, OH
reply to atnozm
Ford has been using 5w-20 in their engines for a very long time. Why would it concern you? I run it in all my Fords. Mustang, F-150, Ranger and Fusion.

Check out »Ford150.net

--
Buckeye Stangs - Ohio Mustang Club

atnozm
Premium
join:2006-02-03
Schenectady, NY
I was just worried about the protection (or lack thereof) once the engine has heated up a bit. With my vehicles when something is broken or needs to be changed/fixed I don't have a problem performing the work. I am however ignorant as to 'how' many parts work.

When I checked the manual I was surprised to see it wanted 5W-20 as I've never had a vehicle that took it before (this is my first Ford).

I know some self proclaimed car enthusiasts will have a heart attack at the very mention of 5W-20. Which also contributed a bit to my paranoia.


VegasMan
Are We There Yet?
Premium
join:2002-11-17
Schaumburg, IL
Reviews:
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reply to atnozm
5-20 is becoming the defacto oil of choice by most manufactures these days. 5-30 is a close second.

EDIT: 5/20 is used for CAFE standards better MPG. But it is also used because the tolerances are very tight these days.

5-30 won't hurt the truck.
--
In need of a Vegas vacation.

billydunwood

join:2008-04-23
united state
kudos:2
reply to atnozm
said by atnozm:

I recently bought a 2005 5.4L Ford F150. I am about to do its first oil change on it and noticed that in the manual it says to use 5W-20. This surprised me, I've never used 5W-20 in my life. Now I know if the manufacturer says to use it it should be ok but to be honest the idea of using 5-20 makes me uncomfortable.

My dad suggested using 15W-40 which seems a little excessive to me. Would there be any negative consequences to using 5W-30 (other than potentially a SLIGHT decrease in mileage)?

said by atnozm:

I recently bought a 2005 5.4L Ford F150. I am about to do its first oil change on it and noticed that in the manual it says to use 5W-20. This surprised me, I've never used 5W-20 in my life. Now I know if the manufacturer says to use it it should be ok but to be honest the idea of using 5-20 makes me uncomfortable.

My dad suggested using 15W-40 which seems a little excessive to me. Would there be any negative consequences to using 5W-30 (other than potentially a SLIGHT decrease in mileage)?

We have a mercury grand marquis(made by Ford), and have had it since 30k miles. it now has 130k miles, and we still use and have used 5w20 since we got it. There is nothing wrong with that oil. We have used Castrol GTX and it has been fine.

Waterbug

join:2008-03-30
reply to atnozm
Modern engines are machined to a lot tighter tolerances than your dad's 1957 Chevy was. The reason that today's engines last longer is that all the parts fit much better. The tight tolerance between parts requires a thinner lubricant to penetrate the small clearances. Using a higher viscosity oil can do damage to the engine, in the amount of time that it takes the oil to heat up and thin down.

atnozm
Premium
join:2006-02-03
Schenectady, NY
Thanks for all the responses. This is the kind of info I was looking for. I knew my concerns were just on a whim as I'm not going to pretend to know the inner workings of engines.

5W-20 it's gonna be.


TheHarvester
Premium
join:2006-08-25
Dana Point, CA
kudos:3
reply to Waterbug
said by Waterbug:

Modern engines are machined to a lot tighter tolerances than your dad's 1957 Chevy was. The reason that today's engines last longer is that all the parts fit much better. The tight tolerance between parts requires a thinner lubricant to penetrate the small clearances. Using a higher viscosity oil can do damage to the engine, in the amount of time that it takes the oil to heat up and thin down.

I seriously doubt the tolerances are much tighter at all. Ford put out a TSB that specifically states the oil was changed for fuel economy and mentions nothing about tighter tolerances. Looking over the specs between a 1990 5.8 and an 2002 5.4 the clearances are nearly identical.
Copy/paste from the TSB.

"Ford Motor Company now recommends SAE 5W-20 viscosity grade for servicing most gasoline and flexible fueled vehicles.
ACTION:

All 2001 and 2002 vehicles where SAE 5W-20 is specified should be serviced at the recommended oil change intervals using SAE 5W-20. This oil is an improved formulation to improve fuel economy. Testing has validated this viscosity grade can be used in many previous model year vehicles. It is recommended ALL vehicles on the following Vehicle Application Listing be service with SAE 5W-20. "
--
mbsastronomy.com

Waterbug

join:2008-03-30
said by TheHarvester:

said by Waterbug:

Modern engines are machined to a lot tighter tolerances than your dad's 1957 Chevy was. The reason that today's engines last longer is that all the parts fit much better. The tight tolerance between parts requires a thinner lubricant to penetrate the small clearances. Using a higher viscosity oil can do damage to the engine, in the amount of time that it takes the oil to heat up and thin down.

I seriously doubt the tolerances are much tighter at all. Ford put out a TSB that specifically states the oil was changed for fuel economy and mentions nothing about tighter tolerances. Looking over the specs between a 1990 5.8 and an 2002 5.4 the clearances are nearly identical.
Copy/paste from the TSB.

"Ford Motor Company now recommends SAE 5W-20 viscosity grade for servicing most gasoline and flexible fueled vehicles.
ACTION:

All 2001 and 2002 vehicles where SAE 5W-20 is specified should be serviced at the recommended oil change intervals using SAE 5W-20. This oil is an improved formulation to improve fuel economy. Testing has validated this viscosity grade can be used in many previous model year vehicles. It is recommended ALL vehicles on the following Vehicle Application Listing be service with SAE 5W-20. "

My quote was: "Modern engines are machined to a lot tighter tolerances than your dad's 1957 Chevy was." I don't recall making any references to a 1990 5.8 whatever. I also seriously doubt that a 1957 Chevy was on that Vehicle Application List of vehicles to be serviced with 5W-20 oil. I really doubt that 5W-20 oil will provide any noticeable fuel economy improvement over 10W-30 oil. Maybe on a dyno, under all kinds of controlled conditions, but not in real life.


TheHarvester
Premium
join:2006-08-25
Dana Point, CA
kudos:3
For started recomending 5-20 in 2000 or 2001 so a 1990 5.8 would e considered old technology and the bearing clearances are going to be very close to a '57 Chevy spec. If you look up the TSB it said they (ford) determined the 5-20 is safe for older engines as well. If it was a tolerance issue that prompted the new oil recomendation, they would have mentioned that. The excluded list is a very short mostly modern engine/vehicle list. Also, what makes you think the engines are lasting longer than they used to?

The auto manufacturers do everything (to a point) in an attempt to increase MPG. Just like Chry. decided to go with a thinner synthetic gear oil in their truck diffs. Since the switch I have seen a big jump in rear diff bearing failures on those trucks. I rebuild Chry diffs 10 to 1 compared to Chevy and about 10 to 3 on Fords. Yet we have NEVER had a customer complain about a drop in fuel economy after I fill the diff with standard gear oil and have not had a repeat failure. '57 Chevy spec. If you look up the TSB it said they (ford) determined the 5-20 is safe for older engines as well. If it was a tolerance issue that prompted the new oil recomendation, they would have mentioned that. The excluded list is a very short mostly modern engine/vehicle list. Also, what makes you think the engines are lasting longer than they used to?

The auto manufacturers do everything (to a point) in an attempt to increase MPG. Just like Chry. decided to go with a thinner synthetic gear oil in their truck diffs. Since the switch I have seen a big jump in rear diff bearing failures on those trucks. I rebuild Chry diffs 10 to 1 compared to Chevy and about 10 to 3 on Fords. Yet we have NEVER had a customer complain about a drop in fuel economy after I fill the diff with standard gear oil and have not had a repeat failure.
--
mbsastronomy.com

Waterbug

join:2008-03-30
You just proved my point. Consumers see no difference in fuel economy, with the difference in viscosity of lubricants. The differences are only measurable on a dyno, under controlled conditions.


mattmag
Premium,ExMod 2000-03
join:2000-04-09
NW Illinois
kudos:3

1 recommendation

reply to atnozm
said by atnozm:

I was just worried about the protection (or lack thereof) once the engine has heated up a bit.

When I was drag racing, I used Royal Purple 0W synthetic oil. Higher viscosity oils were once thought to be the best so they would "stand-up" to to the pressures better. As it turns out, there is much to be gained with "flow-ability", in other words, it is better to have the oil reach all needed areas faster.

The 0W stuff was literally like water, but very slippery! I never had bearing issues, and I admit it was a bit of a struggle for this old-fashioned guy to stop using 20W-50 racing oil and go to 0W.

On the dyno, the 0W produced a clear 18HP gain in overall power. Pretty impressive stuff.


TheHarvester
Premium
join:2006-08-25
Dana Point, CA
kudos:3
reply to Waterbug
NO. You said they changed the oil because the tolerances are tighter. Ford says they changed it for fuel economy and makes no mention of tighter tolerances.
If Ford changed the oil because the engines REQUIRE thinner oil, they would have stated that. we have been using 10-30 for 20 years and have yet to have a vehicle come back with an engine problem due to the oil.

Go look up the engine specs yourself and you will see for yourself, they are very close to the same.
--
mbsastronomy.com

Waterbug

join:2008-03-30
said by TheHarvester:

Go look up the engine specs yourself and you will see for yourself, they are very close to the same.

My comparison was a 1957 Chevy to a 2005 Ford. You chose the specs that you want me to compare. They have NOTHING to do with my original statement. 1957 until 2005 is 48 years. 1990 until 2005 is only 15 years. I never made a comparison of a 1990 and a 2005, you did. I don't dispute your specs, but they have no relevance to my statement.


TheHarvester
Premium
join:2006-08-25
Dana Point, CA
kudos:3
A 1990 and a 1957 engine design hasn't changed very much at all and I am willing to bet the clearance specs aren't far off either. If by putting a thinner oil that is easier to pump will require less power to pump it and therefore can increase mileage. If it increases it enough so they can bump the EPA estimate another mile or 2 it will make the vehicle look that much better. There are VERY FEW people who get what the EPA estimates claim and that has been an issue for years but the manufactures try and find was to bump the numbers any way they can.

Once again FORD put out a TSB to all of it's mechanics, service managers, service writers, parts managers and parts salesmen saying they changed the oil to increase mileage... period. So, why would Ford lie to a vast majority of its employees if the real reason was that the engine REQUIRED it because of tighter clearances? and can you come up with a Ford document backing up your claim?
--
mbsastronomy.com


sk1939
Premium
join:2010-10-23
Mclean, VA
kudos:10
Reviews:
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That may be true for Ford, but engine tolerances for the luxury brand, and the Japanese brands, have gotten much tighter over the years. GM and Ford big, small, and long-bloc engines all have large tolerances built in, but not everything is that way. As someone else pointed out, Dodge's Hemi is very particular about it's oil grade.


TheHarvester
Premium
join:2006-08-25
Dana Point, CA
kudos:3
The O.P. wasn't asking about a luxury, Japanese or a hemi engine. He was asking about a Ford truck with a 5.4 and Waterbug See Profile said Ford changed the oil because of the engine. I pointed out that Ford (in writing) said they changed the oil for another reason.
--
mbsastronomy.com


sk1939
Premium
join:2010-10-23
Mclean, VA
kudos:10
Reviews:
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I'm not going to dispute that.

If it's an EcoTec, or one of Fords newer engines, then the tolerances are tighter, but I think it's a Triton V8 so not quite as picky. As far as oil goes, there's some debate as to what you can use, but 5W-20, 5W-30, 0W-20, 10W-30, and maybe even 10W-40 should be fine.


TheHarvester
Premium
join:2006-08-25
Dana Point, CA
kudos:3
Thats just it, the thread was about a run-of-the-mill 2005 Ford 5.4L engine. 10W30 will not hurt that motor. 10-30 is just slightly thicker when cold and slightly thicker when hot compared to 5-20.
--
mbsastronomy.com

ke4pym
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join:2004-07-24
Charlotte, NC
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reply to atnozm
I've been using 5w-30 in my 02 F150 for 8 years now and no issues.

Other than where the oil filter lives. Who in their right mind puts the filter above the front diff? It is SOOOOOOOOO painful to get to. And the filter likes to tighten itself up.

Finally found K&N had a filter with a nut welded on the end of it. Makes changing it a breeze. But rather expensive.