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JasonOD

@comcast.net

Sad but predictable outcome

While the MPAA/RIAA overreaches at times, they're not going to give up on chasing the bad apples. And as usual, those bad apples spoil the bunch. We'll all pay more because of this.

I don't understand the last point about targeting suspected users as being unreliable. ISP's know exactly what IP is assigned to whom, and 'accidentally' having your connection used/compromised by a guilty third party is no longer a defense. I know mistakes get made, just not at the level you seem to project.



TamaraB
Question The Current Paradigm
Premium
join:2000-11-08
Da Bronx
Reviews:
·Optimum Online
·Clearwire Wireless

1 recommendation

said by JasonOD :

ISP's know exactly what IP is assigned to whom, and 'accidentally' having your connection used/compromised by a guilty third party is no longer a defense.

Open Wi-Fi Is Not a Crime! And no, your ISP does not have a right to snoop (DPI) on your private communications without a warrant. Anyone wanting some measure of privacy, and a semblance of network neutrality, only needs to use an off-shore VPN.

The combination of ISP interference in Internet access, the outrageous MAFFIA in league with U.S. courts engaging in more and more extortion schemes, and ICE running around, illegally taking-down reams of websites like a bull in a China closest, has already started an unfortunate exodus. I have already moved all of my web and mail servers out of the country. It's a sad day, when one has to leave America to be free.

Bob
--
"Remember, remember the fifth of November.
Gunpowder, Treason and Plot.
I see no reason why Gunpowder Treason
Should ever be forgot."

"People should not be afraid of their governments. Governments should be afraid of their people"



Bugger

@rr.com

You may have to move the users of your web and mail servers outside of the USA as well if this continues to happen. Or start using Freenet.



ctceo
Premium
join:2001-04-26
South Bend, IN
Reviews:
·Virgin Mobile Br..
reply to TamaraB

Actually, yes they do. You data is traveling across THEIR network, and they don't need to get permission to open you comms and watch.

If you were to make a service available where people could walk through your house and use some rooms to get to the street on the other side and the walkers decided to build a protective wall so you couldn't see what was going on in your house along that path and in those rooms you'd shit your pants trying to tear down that wall.

It is a sad thing that the us has become nothing more than a puppet to the oligarchic corporatocracy that has built itself up around the fractal monetary reserve, a broken system to begin with, but it's true. It's never going to stop until the "bad code" gets replaced with newer better "code", to use computer terms.
--
»were.boldlygoingnowhere.org if we don't change out ways!



BHNtechXpert
BHN Staff
Premium,VIP
join:2006-02-16
Saint Petersburg, FL
kudos:147
reply to TamaraB

said by TamaraB:

said by JasonOD :

ISP's know exactly what IP is assigned to whom, and 'accidentally' having your connection used/compromised by a guilty third party is no longer a defense.

Open Wi-Fi Is Not a Crime! And no, your ISP does not have a right to snoop (DPI) on your private communications without a warrant. Anyone wanting some measure of privacy, and a semblance of network neutrality, only needs to use an off-shore VPN.

The combination of ISP interference in Internet access, the outrageous MAFFIA in league with U.S. courts engaging in more and more extortion schemes, and ICE running around, illegally taking-down reams of websites like a bull in a China closest, has already started an unfortunate exodus. I have already moved all of my web and mail servers out of the country. It's a sad day, when one has to leave America to be free.

Bob

You are wrong. Your ISP does have the right to snoop on you in the general sense. You are using their network and they have every right to insure the integrity of their network at all times. Integrity doesn't stop at whether the network works or not but any activity on that network that could jeopardize the network, it's users or the legal safety of the company as a whole.

Additionally your internet traffic is already being snooped upon by the feds anyway (again in a general sense). Has been for several years. You know...those pesky little laws enacted after 911 to protect the homeland....

So get over it...this myth of implied privacy is just a myth. If you aren't doing anything wrong to begin with you have nothing to fear.
--
"I can’t give you a surefire formula for success, but I can give you a formula for failure: try to please everybody all the time."
~ Herbert Bayard Swope


firephoto
We the people
Premium
join:2003-03-18
Brewster, WA

said by BHNtechXpert:

So get over it...this myth of implied privacy is just a myth. If you aren't doing anything wrong to begin with you have nothing to fear.

That's the biggest bullshit argument ever and you know it but it keeps the sheep happy and their the majority of dumb customers so lets set the bar low.

How does a one-of-a-kind implementation of something not leave one fearing the fact that someone WILL get knowledge of it because a bunch of power hungry and money seeking ISPs are spying on users data because the feds do it so they know they can get away with it too.

And that is what most of this is about anyway. The RIAA and friends crap is just a distraction. It's pathetic that physical contact with others is almost the only way to conduct real sensitive business in these technologically advanced times all because of government endorsed spying on citizens being legal.

So you have the ISP as the biggest problem in the mix because they do NOT get rid of those customers they know are "offenders" but instead wait for a paying **AA who wants customer records. It must be great to not only provide internet when paid but provide personal information out the other end to anyone paying the fee. Another great scam in this land of the free.
--
Say no to JAMS!


BHNtechXpert
BHN Staff
Premium,VIP
join:2006-02-16
Saint Petersburg, FL
kudos:147

said by firephoto:

said by BHNtechXpert:

So get over it...this myth of implied privacy is just a myth. If you aren't doing anything wrong to begin with you have nothing to fear.

That's the biggest bullshit argument ever and you know it but it keeps the sheep happy and their the majority of dumb customers so lets set the bar low.

How does a one-of-a-kind implementation of something not leave one fearing the fact that someone WILL get knowledge of it because a bunch of power hungry and money seeking ISPs are spying on users data because the feds do it so they know they can get away with it too.

The same way policies at work or in our society are implemented. The behaviors or the misbahaviors of the masses dictate the corrective measure and it's not always the minority causing the problem (like with this situation). If it were a small group of people then you might be correct but the problem is at an epidemic level....we're not talking about a few thousand people here...we're talking millions of violators.

Your pie in the sky visions of "we should treat each problem individually" perfect world doesn't exist. It's impossible and impractical to do this one a singular basis.

And your land of the free bullshit doesn't fly with me either. We are a land of laws, laws that all people are expected to follow in order to manage order and peace in our relatively free society. Without law our society as we love it ceases to exist...stop spewing that "land of the free" crap because it's obvious you have no clue as to how you got to be so free to begin with...
--
"I can’t give you a surefire formula for success, but I can give you a formula for failure: try to please everybody all the time."
~ Herbert Bayard Swope

kiamsiamdala

join:2001-11-05
Utica, MI
reply to BHNtechXpert

Wow. With that line of thinking, why not have cameras set up in each room of our homes for them to monitor us with. Governmental GPS trackers on our cars would make sense too. We should probably do away with cash, as well.


watice

join:2008-11-01
New York, NY
reply to BHNtechXpert

I agree with your land of the laws statement. I'm no lawyer, but I'm pretty sure your domestic privacy is protected under our current laws.

I know you didn't make this analogy, but I see a severe flaw with the building a wall so you can't see in the house statement the person in this thread had mentioned. If I were to set up an email server for a company, and I happened to own the server, does that give me the right to go through everyones email? I think there's an expectation of privacy with emails (unless otherwise noted), and I'd think there'd be an even bigger expectation of privacy with data you transmit through your ISP's network.

DPI is wrong on so many levels, and inefficient if the savvy will continue to find ways around it. I myself use a VPN on my VPS as well, but only when I'm on someone else's network. I'd expect to have some sort of privacy when using the services of an ISP that I pay [a large chunk of] money to monthly.



ctceo
Premium
join:2001-04-26
South Bend, IN
Reviews:
·Virgin Mobile Br..
reply to BHNtechXpert

Then why is it class actions are now banned? Is that not essentially every man for himself? If it isn't I don't know what is.
--
»were.boldlygoingnowhere.org if we don't change out ways!



ctceo
Premium
join:2001-04-26
South Bend, IN
reply to kiamsiamdala

Does mobile x-ray, thermographic imaging, paralleled computing, and onstar mean anything to you?
--
»were.boldlygoingnowhere.org if we don't change out ways!



ctceo
Premium
join:2001-04-26
South Bend, IN
Reviews:
·Virgin Mobile Br..
reply to watice

So them where does the problem truly lie?

The nature of your secured content?
The design and implementation of the infrastructure it uses?
The fees you pay for said services?
The system that generates the currency you use to pay for it?

The answer may surprise you.
--
»were.boldlygoingnowhere.org if we don't change out ways!



BHNtechXpert
BHN Staff
Premium,VIP
join:2006-02-16
Saint Petersburg, FL
kudos:147
reply to watice

said by watice:

I agree with your land of the laws statement. I'm no lawyer, but I'm pretty sure your domestic privacy is protected under our current laws.

I know you didn't make this analogy, but I see a severe flaw with the building a wall so you can't see in the house statement the person in this thread had mentioned. If I were to set up an email server for a company, and I happened to own the server, does that give me the right to go through everyones email? I think there's an expectation of privacy with emails (unless otherwise noted), and I'd think there'd be an even bigger expectation of privacy with data you transmit through your ISP's network.

DPI is wrong on so many levels, and inefficient if the savvy will continue to find ways around it. I myself use a VPN on my VPS as well, but only when I'm on someone else's network. I'd expect to have some sort of privacy when using the services of an ISP that I pay [a large chunk of] money to monthly.

There is no privacy on the internet period...stop with that already. You are using someone elses network. They by your own user agreement may take whatever measures needed to secure that network, its users and any protections needed to insure that the company does not get into a legal situation. They aren't snooping your emails (the ISP that is) and they don't care what you transmit or receive so long as its not illegal. DPI would be used to look for specific signatures ONLY. I don't understand why people can't get this. If you guys would grab the actual issues where you are protected I would help ya out a bit but you guys are grasping at all the wrong straws. And don't ask I'm not gonna help you with the right ones...sooner or later somebody will get it.
--
"I can’t give you a surefire formula for success, but I can give you a formula for failure: try to please everybody all the time."
~ Herbert Bayard Swope


BHNtechXpert
BHN Staff
Premium,VIP
join:2006-02-16
Saint Petersburg, FL
kudos:147
reply to ctceo

said by ctceo:

Then why is it class actions are now banned? Is that not essentially every man for himself? If it isn't I don't know what is.

Your statement has nothing to do with the issue being discussed. Tort is a whole different beast...don't confuse the two.
--
"I can’t give you a surefire formula for success, but I can give you a formula for failure: try to please everybody all the time."
~ Herbert Bayard Swope


BHNtechXpert
BHN Staff
Premium,VIP
join:2006-02-16
Saint Petersburg, FL
kudos:147
reply to ctceo

said by ctceo:

So them where does the problem truly lie?

The nature of your secured content?
The design and implementation of the infrastructure it uses?
The fees you pay for said services?
The system that generates the currency you use to pay for it?

The answer may surprise you.

The answer is in the people. Our society has become riddled with those who think they can just follow the laws they want to hell with the rest. We have raised three generations of uneducated, selfish, lazy, narcissistic little brats. They think they are above the law and they care about one thing and one thing only...themselves...to hell with everyone else. That's the problem...
--
"I can’t give you a surefire formula for success, but I can give you a formula for failure: try to please everybody all the time."
~ Herbert Bayard Swope

kiamsiamdala

join:2001-11-05
Utica, MI
reply to ctceo

Are they blanket implementations of governmental design?
--
'void planets roll regardless of desolation'



BHNtechXpert
BHN Staff
Premium,VIP
join:2006-02-16
Saint Petersburg, FL
kudos:147

said by kiamsiamdala:

Are they blanket implementations of governmental design?

Foil Hats Anyone?

kiamsiamdala

join:2001-11-05
Utica, MI

It was a loaded question, not me putting on a foil hat. Nice job at assuming, though. As you seem to always be in the right, and everybody else is lazy, stupid and self-entitled, I'll leave you to you delusions of grandeur. lol
--
'void planets roll
regardless of desolation'



BHNtechXpert
BHN Staff
Premium,VIP
join:2006-02-16
Saint Petersburg, FL
kudos:147

said by kiamsiamdala:

It was a loaded question, not me putting on a foil hat. Nice job at assuming, though. As you seem to always be in the right, and everybody else is lazy, stupid and self-entitled, I'll leave you to you delusions of grandeur. lol

My apologies...your question seemed more like a statement implying some government conspiracy...
--
"I can’t give you a surefire formula for success, but I can give you a formula for failure: try to please everybody all the time."
~ Herbert Bayard Swope

watice

join:2008-11-01
New York, NY

3 edits
reply to BHNtechXpert

said by BHNtechXpert:

There is no privacy on the internet period...stop with that already. You are using someone elses network. They by your own user agreement may take whatever measures needed to secure that network, its users and any protections needed to insure that the company does not get into a legal situation.

off the top of my head here..

»en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic···vacy_Act

»www22.verizon.com/privacy/ (as it applies to me)

who on earth told you there is no privacy on the internet? you cannot intercept data that is transmitted between two endpoints unless consent is given to, or there's a warrant. it's really simple to grasp. As it stands, there is nothing in their privacy policy or my user agreement that says DPI can be used to track what i'm transferring for the purposes of identifying pirated/copyrighted material.

As far as what they "care & don't care about", I really don't care what they care & don't care about, only about what IS. And what IS, is that my ISP cannot and does not do that. That's why they participate in the 3-strikes program and the MPAA/RIAA lawyers have to rely on 3rd parties connecting to trackers/peers to send a warning letter.

OT a lil bit, but are you a DPI equipment vendor ?


ctceo
Premium
join:2001-04-26
South Bend, IN
Reviews:
·Virgin Mobile Br..
reply to TamaraB

I would like to clarify that I agree open wi-fi is not a crime, and more people should share. But the current system is not designed for people to share it's designed for competition (otherwise known as fighting) and we all know where that mentality goes.
--
»were.boldlygoingnowhere.org if we don't change out ways!



ctceo
Premium
join:2001-04-26
South Bend, IN
Reviews:
·Virgin Mobile Br..
reply to BHNtechXpert

The problem is as old as civilization itself. The Fractal Monetary Systems put in place thousands of years ago. The behavior of the society that sprung up around it is the way it is because of the system.
--
»were.boldlygoingnowhere.org if we don't change out ways!



ctceo
Premium
join:2001-04-26
South Bend, IN
Reviews:
·Virgin Mobile Br..
reply to BHNtechXpert

This is the common response that usually erupts around a concept that is considered to be idealistic or to good to be true. That only compounds the problem and makes it worse.
--
»were.boldlygoingnowhere.org if we don't change out ways!



ctceo
Premium
join:2001-04-26
South Bend, IN
Reviews:
·Virgin Mobile Br..
reply to watice

If it profits them to do so, they will, and even if they do they don't have to tell you.

Whats one of the first things a lawyer typically tells you about defending your not-guilty plea when you choose to allow them to defend you against a charge?

The mentality of a TOS/EULA is from a perspective of litigious nature.

Just because you committed a crime doesn't mean you have to admit guilt. In fact their job is to attempt to absolve you of this charge though debate, or reduce the charges if that is not possible.
--
»were.boldlygoingnowhere.org if we don't change out ways!



TamaraB
Question The Current Paradigm
Premium
join:2000-11-08
Da Bronx
Reviews:
·Optimum Online
·Clearwire Wireless
reply to ctceo

said by ctceo:

I would like to clarify that I agree open wi-fi is not a crime, and more people should share. But the current system is not designed for people to share it's designed for competition (otherwise known as fighting) and we all know where that mentality goes.

Well, the Internet was specifically designed, and purposed, for people to share, and is structured to make sharing easy. The current system is not very different from the initial design. Even WIFI modems installed by most ISPs, until recently, were shipped fully open and unsecured.

Internet culture itself has not changed much either. It has always been, and remains in large part, a place to freely share information -- technology, art, music, literature, experiences, and culture in general. That's not a bad thing, it's a very healthy social activity. Sharing your excess bandwidth is a courteous and neighborly act, which tends to make friends not enemies.

Bob
--
"Remember, remember the fifth of November.
Gunpowder, Treason and Plot.
I see no reason why Gunpowder Treason
Should ever be forgot."

"People should not be afraid of their governments. Governments should be afraid of their people"



BHNtechXpert
BHN Staff
Premium,VIP
join:2006-02-16
Saint Petersburg, FL
kudos:147

1 edit

said by TamaraB:

said by ctceo:

I would like to clarify that I agree open wi-fi is not a crime, and more people should share. But the current system is not designed for people to share it's designed for competition (otherwise known as fighting) and we all know where that mentality goes.

Well, the Internet was specifically designed, and purposed, for people to share, and is structured to make sharing easy. The current system is not very different from the initial design. Even WIFI modems installed by most ISPs, until recently, were shipped fully open and unsecured.

Internet culture itself has not changed much either. It has always been, and remains in large part, a place to freely share information -- technology, art, music, literature, experiences, and culture in general. That's not a bad thing, it's a very healthy social activity. Sharing your excess bandwidth is a courteous and neighborly act, which tends to make friends not enemies.

Bob

The bandwidth isn't your to share. You aren't paying for bandwidth (yet) you are paying for a pipe to the internet at a rated speed and that is all. The bandwidth is not yours to share.
--
"I can’t give you a surefire formula for success, but I can give you a formula for failure: try to please everybody all the time."
~ Herbert Bayard Swope


ctceo
Premium
join:2001-04-26
South Bend, IN
Reviews:
·Virgin Mobile Br..

Scarcity is to blame here. False scarcity. With QoS design and load-balancing hardware, the issue of "handicapped bandwidth" is also false.
--
»were.boldlygoingnowhere.org if we don't change out ways!