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inGearX
3.1415 9265

join:2000-06-11
New York

[WIN7] how to get my user files?

I switched hard drives from my old laptop to a new laptop

and I see that all my files under C:\Users\USERNAME are encrypted

is there anyway I can get them?

thank you...
PS I'm on Win 7


ZZZZZZZ
Premium
join:2001-05-27
PARADISE
kudos:1
Who/what encrypted them?

What happens when you try to extract them..[right mouse click > Run as Administrator)?
--
~~Get our troops home...now!!~~


inGearX
3.1415 9265

join:2000-06-11
New York
said by ZZZZZZZ:

Who/what encrypted them?

What happens when you try to extract them..[right mouse click > Run as Administrator)?

it's done by default in Win7 - all user files are encrypted on the FS
can't just take out the drive and view them
need to be logged in as that user - even if there is no password on the account

if I try to access them - it says they are protected
will try the right click

OZO
Premium
join:2003-01-17
kudos:2
reply to inGearX
Are you sure that they're actually encrypted?

Do you have access to them to see or check? If you don't (it's a common case), you have to take ownership of them first (don't do it unless you are sure that they are not encrypted!) Then you may copy or use them. Files in user specific folders are usually protected with this simple way...

But, if those files are really encrypted, you're in a big trouble. You have to run OS from that drive, login as that user, copy those files in folder that is not encrypted and only then access them from other login session. And BTW, advice for future - don't encrypt your files unless you know how to deal with that in different scenarios (like this one)...
--
Keep it simple, it'll become complex by itself...

OZO
Premium
join:2003-01-17
kudos:2
reply to inGearX
"Protected" doesn't necessarily mean they are encrypted...


Kramer
Premium,Mod
join:2000-08-03
Richmond, VA
kudos:2

1 edit
reply to inGearX
Windows does not encrypt any files that I know of by default. You are probably dealing with a file permission issue. I couldn't find much that Microsoft has published that is as helpful as this article: »www.blogsdna.com/2159/how-to-tak···ws-7.htm

Give it a try.
Edit:

also: »technet.microsoft.com/en-us/libr···659.aspx

The above will give you ownership of the files, but then you are going to need to apply permissions to the files to a user or users on the new system. I really haven't had to do this with Windows 7 that I can think of though. Usually, when logged in as administrator I am just asked if I would like to access the inaccessible files and if I say yes, it handles the whole mess automatically. Maybe the foreign ownership here is the reason why Windows can't do anything. After taking ownership of the folder, you might just want to click on it and see if Windows handles the permissions for you automatically.

Shootist
Premium
join:2003-02-10
Decatur, GA
kudos:3
reply to inGearX
A simple way to stop part of this is to always use the same username and password on both PCs. At least doing that you have a chance of getting any file off the older drive without much trouble.
--
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Kramer
Premium,Mod
join:2000-08-03
Richmond, VA
kudos:2
That actually will not help when moving a hard drive from one computer to another. The user information is completely worthless when doing that.


Dr Tweak

join:2004-09-23
Chesapeake, VA
reply to inGearX
Simply take ownership of them and you can do as you please with them.


Shootist
Premium
join:2003-02-10
Decatur, GA
kudos:3
reply to Kramer
said by Kramer:

That actually will not help when moving a hard drive from one computer to another. The user information is completely worthless when doing that.

That is not true. I have 2 OS's on 2 separate HDDs, XP on one and 7 on the other. In this same PC I have 3 other HDDs with all kinds of files. When switching out HDDs I have no problem accessing all those files. Why because the user name and password, along with all permissions for that username and password are the same.
--
Shooter Ready--Stand By BEEP ********

OZO
Premium
join:2003-01-17
kudos:2
NTFS access control doesn't use user names, it uses unique IDs associated with users.
--
Keep it simple, it'll become complex by itself...


ironwalker
World Renowned
Premium,MVM
join:2001-08-31
Keansburg, NJ
reply to inGearX
If you can put the origional hard drive back in the laptop and are in deed using windows EFS (encypted File System) you can get to the EFS tool/admin box and have a recovery record copied to a thumb drive which should have been done in the first place if you used the Windows encypted File Sysem for your hard drive.

Then you can install new drive back and use the recovery record from thumb drive to retrieve/copy/manipulate any of the origional files.

If you never used EFS on the origional hard drive, the colored file names are not encrypted but showing that they are from another user or compressed or from another pc. There is a place to show (don't remember where) what all the different colored file names mean.
Taking owner ship in admin mode should work, you may need to go into safe mode but shouldn't need to.
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dave
Premium,MVM
join:2000-05-04
not in ohio
kudos:8
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
reply to inGearX
said by inGearX:

it's done by default in Win7 - all user files are encrypted on the FS

No it isn't and not they are not.


Kramer
Premium,Mod
join:2000-08-03
Richmond, VA
kudos:2
reply to Shootist
said by Shootist:

said by Kramer:

That actually will not help when moving a hard drive from one computer to another. The user information is completely worthless when doing that.

That is not true. I have 2 OS's on 2 separate HDDs, XP on one and 7 on the other. In this same PC I have 3 other HDDs with all kinds of files. When switching out HDDs I have no problem accessing all those files. Why because the user name and password, along with all permissions for that username and password are the same.

I am not sure what you are observing, but you are simply incorrect. As OZO See Profile points out, Windows does not use user names but it does use unique IDs. See the attached image of a foreign drive that just happens to be attached to my system. Accounts which are local are translated by Windows to a user name which you are familiar with, but accounts which are not local have a user ID that will not be duplicated no matter how hard you try. Notice the account that starts with S-1-5. That account is unknown to Windows because there is no corresponding account on the local system to go with it. There is no way you can match that. If you create an account with the same password and same user name, it is still going to have a different UID. This is why you need to take ownership of the files.

dave
Premium,MVM
join:2000-05-04
not in ohio
kudos:8
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS

1 recommendation

Of course, he might have his permissions set so that all users can get access, which is why all users can get access

There's nothing that requires only one user to be able to touch files. (I know you know this, I'm just stating it for the public).