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joako
Premium
join:2000-09-07
/dev/null
kudos:6
reply to slckusr

Re: Own you?

said by slckusr:

said by flycuban:

I guess verizon feels that they own your device that YOU paid for.

Its not just Verizon, Motorola also likes to keep things locked up (bootloaders). This stuff wont change and there arent enough people to get loud enough to make them care.

At least Verizon has an excuse to lock some things down (tethering does use spectrum, which cost money).

Tethering doesn't use spectrum. It allows the transfer of data between your phone and computer.

With all the carriers going to metered per-MB plans, it's not relevant. If you pay for 2GB of data, it is the same resources for the carrier if you use the data on your phone, on your tethered computer, or on your ass for that matter.

Tethering using more data than accessing the internet on your phone, so the carriers will make more revenue if more users tether.
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slckusr
Premium
join:2003-03-17
Greenville, SC
kudos:1
Tethering doesnt directly use spectrum, but getting the data from the web to your phone sure does.


FFH5
Premium
join:2002-03-03
Tavistock NJ
kudos:5
reply to joako
said by joako:

With all the carriers going to metered per-MB plans, it's not relevant. If you pay for 2GB of data, it is the same resources for the carrier if you use the data on your phone, on your tethered computer, or on your ass for that matter.

Tethering using more data than accessing the internet on your phone, so the carriers will make more revenue if more users tether.


I agree about pricing on UBB, BUT ........

said by hottboiinnc:

Yes but putting that device on a computer can and most likely will cause more strain on the network due to pulling more data over it.

But the above is also true. So where is the tradeoff. If the ISP charges for tethering they get more money for expanding infrastructure to handle increased demand.
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elray

join:2000-12-16
Santa Monica, CA
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·EarthLink
reply to joako
said by joako:

said by slckusr:

said by flycuban:

I guess verizon feels that they own your device that YOU paid for.

Its not just Verizon, Motorola also likes to keep things locked up (bootloaders). This stuff wont change and there arent enough people to get loud enough to make them care.

At least Verizon has an excuse to lock some things down (tethering does use spectrum, which cost money).

Tethering doesn't use spectrum. It allows the transfer of data between your phone and computer.

With all the carriers going to metered per-MB plans, it's not relevant. If you pay for 2GB of data, it is the same resources for the carrier if you use the data on your phone, on your tethered computer, or on your ass for that matter.

Tethering using more data than accessing the internet on your phone, so the carriers will make more revenue if more users tether.

That's only true if the tetherers buy larger buckets, or pay overages. Tetherers watching the meter WILL use more spectrum, but the carrier will not make additional revenue unless they exceed their quota; by charging the tethering surcharge up front, the carrier makes up for the revenue loss without having to resort to an overage charge.

Bucket plans aren't sold on the basis of every user achieving 100% utilization. Not by a long shot.

If you want to argue that "all bits are equal" and enforce same in the contract, then you'll find bits priced for peak-access, and your "up to 2GB" plan will become an "up to 1GB" plan for the same price, and in place of overages, you'll just pay for each additional GB at the base rate.

AT&T demonstrated how little spectrum is available for data with its iPhone fiasco - and with "smart" phone subscriptions and data volumes expecting to skyrocket, the carriers are scrambling to both accomodate the demand for the functionality, while pricing data within reach of Mom's family plan, and schooling 100 million subscribers on how to conserve, in order to fit everyone within the narrow bandwidth that's available. That means clamping down on casual tethering. Sorry.