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Anon

@comcastbusiness.net

Half baked

Wonder how HTC, Samsung, and others who have invested in Droid feel about this.

So that means that now even many of the hardware devices will only be about 80% usable, just like most Google software?
rradina

join:2000-08-08
Chesterfield, MO

Re: Half baked

Maybe they'll go cry to Microsoft?

PToN
Premium
join:2001-10-04
Houston, TX
said by Anon :

Wonder how HTC, Samsung, and others who have invested in Droid feel about this.

So that means that now even many of the hardware devices will only be about 80% usable, just like most Google software?

Why would they feel anything?? HTC have been doing great on their own and so has Samsung.

Samsung is way too big for google to buy, i am sure samsung would had said no to any deals.

The acquisition only means that google will make money out of the sales and that motorola mobile will report to google and not motorola anymore.

What are you trying to do with your phone..??? 80% ready..???? Can you make phone calls? can you send messages?? can you use data communications on your phone..?? 80% read?? you are probably half baked....

Bootes
Premium
join:2005-01-28
New York, NY

Re: Half baked

The point is that for future phones Google has an incentive to give preferential treatment to their own phones (Motorola) over other hardware companies. If I were HTC or Samsung this would definitely make me put more focus on Windows Phone 7 and maybe even abandon Android.
openbox9
Premium
join:2004-01-26
Germany
kudos:2

Re: Half baked

The OS is available to all manufacturers. What preferential treatment do you expect?

JasonOD

@comcast.net

Re: Half baked

The presumption is that the goog will be testing/releasing android versions to their new acquisition first. And because of the OS release/timing schedules, it will seriously dampen the other handset makers (and perhaps carriers) ability to customize the OS without being late to the update game.

The incentive will be toward google's own default. How 'open' is that?
openbox9
Premium
join:2004-01-26
Germany
kudos:2

Re: Half baked

Not much different than what Google does currently with its Nexus line of Android devices. The other manufacturers are already at a disadvantage due to the OS customizations that they believe necessary to distinguish their platforms. I don't see much changing in the Android space because of this acquisition.
said by Larry Page :

This acquisition will not change our commitment to run Android as an open platform. Motorola will remain a licensee of Android and Android will remain open. We will run Motorola as a separate business.


Bootes
Premium
join:2005-01-28
New York, NY

1 edit

Re: Half baked

It isn't too different, but the Nexus phones aren't widely distributed and the different manufacturers seem to take turns building them. When you can get a Motorola Nexus phone at any cell phone store and in various configurations, would you be as likely to buy a phone from Samsung or HTC?
openbox9
Premium
join:2004-01-26
Germany
kudos:2

Re: Half baked

Considering I don't envision an opportunity to "get a Motorola Nexus phone at any cell phone and in various configurations", I'm not too concerned about it. There are a lot of people that really like Samsung and HTC handsets.

Bootes
Premium
join:2005-01-28
New York, NY

Re: Half baked

said by openbox9:

Considering I don't envision an opportunity to "get a Motorola Nexus phone at any cell phone and in various configurations", I'm not too concerned about it. There are a lot of people that really like Samsung and HTC handsets.

But Motorola phones are widely distributed and that's exactly what every Motorola cell phone will be after the deal goes through. The only way to prevent this is for Google execs to ignore Motorola after the purchase. Yes, Google is really buying them for their patents, but it would still be a huge waste of money to just kill off the hardware side.

Bootes
Premium
join:2005-01-28
New York, NY
The OS is not open to all manufacturers. Honeycomb has not been released to everyone and has been kept closed source so far.

At least some preferential treatment is impossible to prevent just because the same people will be making the important decisions at Google and Moto.
openbox9
Premium
join:2004-01-26
Germany
kudos:2

Re: Half baked

Yet several Honeycomb-based tablets are on the market. Open platform doesn't necessitate open source software. Has a hardware manufacturer been denied access to Honeycomb to build an Android tablet?

Motorola will still be operated as a separate company. I believe you're overestimating how much Google wants to be in the manufacturing business.

Bootes
Premium
join:2005-01-28
New York, NY

Re: Half baked

The Xoom was the only one for a long time, the others have only come out recently.

Yes honeycomb is not given to anyone who doesn't want to pay Google licensing fees for access to the market, maps, etc. This is why there's no Viewsonic, Archos, etc Honeycomb tablets. Meaning that at this point Honeycomb is as "open" as Windows Phone 7.
openbox9
Premium
join:2004-01-26
Germany
kudos:2

Re: Half baked

said by Bootes:

Meaning that at this point Honeycomb is as "open" as Windows Phone 7.

Ok. Doesn't mean it's not available for licensing and use in whatever manner a manufacturer plans. Still waiting for that preferential treatment to present itself.
iansltx

join:2007-02-19
Austin, TX
kudos:2
They're probably waiting on Ice Cream Sandwich to do full OSS on the tablet variant. They're trying to work out issues with the platform in the mean time.
openbox9
Premium
join:2004-01-26
Germany
kudos:2

Re: Half baked

said by iansltx:

They're probably waiting on Ice Cream Sandwich to do full OSS on the tablet variant.

Google has already stated as much.
iansltx

join:2007-02-19
Austin, TX
kudos:2
Reviews:
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Google has formed a "get updates out the door ASAP" alliance with companies including HTC and Samsung. The lag has come from manufacturer OS skinning and such, not so much Google holding anything back. Also keep in mind that the Nexus devices are all made by either Samsung or HTC, not Motorola (though one could argue that the original Droid/Milestone was a Nexus-like device).

93388818
It's cool, I'm takin it back
Premium
join:2000-03-14
Dallas, TX
said by Bootes:

The point is that for future phones Google has an incentive to give preferential treatment to their own phones (Motorola) over other hardware companies. If I were HTC or Samsung this would definitely make me put more focus on Windows Phone 7 and maybe even abandon Android.

abandoning android would be suicide for HTC, Samsung
--
"To be sincere, you don't have to know anything, you just say whatever makes you feel good and spin and smug circles in your tiny fucked up little head, happy as long as you're true to yourself. In other words, Sincerity is bullshit!" -Penn Jillette
xenophon

join:2007-09-17
said by Anon :

Wonder how HTC, Samsung, and others who have invested in Droid feel about this.

They seem to approve. The enemy of our enemy is our friend.

This is about acquiring patents to protect Android.

JasonOD

@comcast.net

Re: Half baked

So how big do you let google become before realizing it's a bad idea? Android's not very open, you guys act as if you want another 'iPhone' like one-size-fits-all handset bully in the marketplace.
iansltx

join:2007-02-19
Austin, TX
kudos:2

Re: Half baked

How many handset models does Moto sell that run Android? Google isn't going to slim down the portfolio to one. It's against their interest, at least as they see it.

FailOverflow

join:2011-02-23
united state
Nothing as they have nothing to do with the "Droid" brand. That's licensed by Verizon.