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MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
Premium
join:2009-06-17
kudos:4
reply to MaynardKrebs

Re: Lawful Access articles - collection

Canadians Not Doing Enough To Protect Privacy On Phones, Devices: Report
»www.huffingtonpost.ca/2011/08/25···339.html

Canada's privacy commissioner says Canadians aren't doing enough to protect their mobile communication devices, such as cellphones and tablet computers.

"We encourage people to use passwords, encryption, privacy settings and every other available measure to safeguard their personal information, because the meaningful protection of privacy has to start with the individual," Commissioner Jennifer Stoddart said.


jfmezei
Premium
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Pointe-Claire, QC
kudos:23
reply to MaynardKrebs

Does anyone know when Parliament reconvenes ? When will Haroper present that omnibus bill ? Will it go to committee for hearings ?


funny0

join:2010-12-22
reply to MaynardKrebs

People should start suing the Harper Conservative party for bringing such retarded laws with lawsuits , they are the cause of it all, maybe 10000 , 25000 dollar small claims actions might be a good start.


MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
Premium
join:2009-06-17
kudos:4
reply to jfmezei

said by jfmezei:

Does anyone know when Parliament reconvenes ? When will Haroper present that omnibus bill ? Will it go to committee for hearings ?

With the committees now stacked with Cons, any hearings there will be a matter of hauling out the rubber stamp. The hearings will be over before lunch.

jfmezei
Premium
join:2007-01-03
Pointe-Claire, QC
kudos:23

There has to be large amount of publish backlash and then the hearings will be more "open".



pjhillier

@mdmanagement.ca
reply to funny0

Odd that no one was barking about suits when the liberals introduced the same bills on three different occasions!


MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
Premium
join:2009-06-17
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Collectively we are are wiser and more vocal now.

Past performance is not indicative of future results. YMMV


MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
Premium
join:2009-06-17
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reply to MaynardKrebs

Law Enforcement Appliance Subverts SSL
»www.wired.com/threatlevel/2010/0···rensics/

The company in question is known as Packet Forensics, which advertised its new man-in-the-middle capabilities in a brochure handed out at the Intelligent Support Systems (ISS) conference, a Washington, D.C., wiretapping convention that typically bans the press.


MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
Premium
join:2009-06-17
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reply to MaynardKrebs

Certi ed Lies: Detecting and Defeating Government Interception Attacks Against SSL
»files.cloudprivacy.net/ssl-mitm.pdf

This paper introduces the compelled certi cate creation attack, in which government agencies may compel a certi cate authority to
issue false SSL certi cates that can be used by intelligence agencies to covertly intercept and hijack individuals' secure Web-based communications. Although we do not have direct evidence that this form of active surveillance is taking place in the wild, we show how products already on the market are geared and marketed towards this kind of use|suggesting such attacks may occur in the future, if they are not already occurring. Finally, we introduce a lightweight browser add-on that detects and thwarts such attacks.


MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
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reply to MaynardKrebs

Too Much Power
»www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/20···orcement

Though the article is in reference the the US Patriot Act, the author raises interesting points for us to ponder as we approach similar crossroads.

For the past 10 years, the Patriot Act’s critics have also made clear that their objections could be cured by amendments that limited its extraordinary surveillance powers to terrorism rather than ordinary criminal investigations. For example, when the act came up for re-authorization this year, Senator Ron Wyden, Democrat of Oregon, introduced a bill that would narrow the most controversial provision of the act, Section 215, which allows the government to seize “any tangible thing” without a warrant, from e-mails to browsing histories to library records. Wyden’s amendment would have required law enforcement officials to demonstrate that the records were connected to terrorism before seizing them.

....Of course, we can’t know precisely how the Patriot Act is being used and misused: Senator Wyden has warned that a secret law allowing the White House to keep its internal interpretations of the act classified means that it is now being used to justify surveillance that goes beyond what the public believes the law allows. But as long as the Patriot Act remains focused on ordinary Americans rather than suspected terrorists, the terrorists -- if you’ll forgive the truism -- have indeed have won.


Too Many Needless Provisions
»www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/20···riot-act

Be wary of 'scope creep'.
Less freedom doesn’t mean more safety.



GNca George
GorillaNET Wireless Broadband
Premium,VIP
join:2008-07-12
Minden, ON

Freedom is not free, free men are not equal, and equal men are not free.

The government is not very interested in your freedom, they are quite satisfied with your obedience. And we are on our way to lots more of that relating to copyrights and the Internet in the omnibus crime bill coming to a parliament near you this fall...

Geo
--
GorillaNET.ca - »gorillanet.ca/
For the serious Internet user.

Attitude is a little thing that makes a big difference.


MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
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reply to MaynardKrebs

Another thoughtful piece by Canada's Privacy Commissioner

Respecting Canadians' Privacy in the Decade After 9/11
»www.huffingtonpost.ca/jennifer-s···780.html

Too bad it'll fall on deaf ears in Ottawa.


MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
Premium
join:2009-06-17
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It's a US article but has implications here too on cell phone tracking.
»online.wsj.com/article/SB1000142···574.html

Check the article out now before it disappears behind the WSJ paywall.


funny0

join:2010-12-22
reply to elwoodblues

said by elwoodblues:

The problem is the core constituency runs around saying if you have nothing to hide, you have nothing to fear.

The Goverment will ignore all this trust me, and it won't resonate with the majority of the public (who have the same mentality as above), not realizing their rights are being unsurped.

If this goes through it will make it's way to the SCC, but by then Harper may have appointed more "like minded" Justices.

Think of the children, those unscrupulous pedophiles leering at naked little children don't you want them and the websites off the net? (I do,but I'm sure they have less the "public" methods of obtaining their materials).

Or even terrorists, we to know when someone is looking a bomb making sites.

The spin machine with unlimited dollars (your tax dollars at work) will be bigger, bolder and more widespread then a few Youtube videos(sorry Milnoc) made for Openmedia.

Just this week alone, the opposition, in light of the problems in Europe wanted a economic update, and the government having the majority , shut down any independent depositions.

so lets put cameras in your bedroom, bathroom and your house and hey lets put devices in you to make sure you do as we say not as we do.

FACT is EVERYONE gets CREEPED OUT when they are overly watched. THIS is what a warrant is supposed to be about , are you acting suspiciously NO..move along.

FACT is if harper dont scrap the prison crap and the jets were on a course like italy and greece. NUFF said.
----------------
CBC also reported yesterday that the omnibus bill does not contain the lawful access legislation ....


tc1979

@teksavvy.com

What does it matter if law enforcement has access to ip logs without a warrant when ISP keep logs for 5+ years as it is right now which is ridiculous. If they have any type of reasonable doubt they will get the warrant anyway.



El Quintron
Resident Mouth Breather
Premium
join:2008-04-28
Etobicoke, ON
kudos:4
reply to MaynardKrebs

Some clarification on Lawful Access should arguing points be required:

»www.michaelgeist.ca/content/view/6020/125/


MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
Premium
join:2009-06-17
kudos:4

said by El Quintron:

Some clarification on Lawful Access should arguing points be required:

»www.michaelgeist.ca/content/view/6020/125/

This bit... "Moreover, based on the prior bill, it will establish a comprehensive regulatory structure for Internet providers that would mandate their assistance with testing their surveillance capabilities and disclosing the names of all employees who may be involved in interceptions (and who may then be subject to RCMP background checks)."

Just hire employees who can't pass an RCMP background check, then no assistance can be given.


mazhurg
Premium
join:2004-05-02
Brighton, ON
Reviews:
·MTS
reply to MaynardKrebs

Here comes the bill (man this government is on fire...).

»www.parl.gc.ca/HousePublications···&File=12

Bet on the quality of the debate?


MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
Premium
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September 27, 2011 — The Minister of Industry and Minister of State (Agriculture) — Bill entitled “An Act to amend the Copyright Act”. 27 septembre 2011 — Le ministre de l'Industrie et ministre d'État (Agriculture) — Projet de loi intitulé « Loi modifiant la Loi sur le droit d'auteur ».


September 27, 2011 — The Minister of Industry and Minister of State (Agriculture) — Bill entitled “An Act to amend the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act”.

------------------

Wonder what this one is all about...could it be about anonymous internet posting, or simply not giving your correct name when questioned by police??

September 27, 2011 — Mr. Richards (Wild Rose) — Bill entitled “An Act to amend the Criminal code (concealment of identity)”.

27 septembre 2011 — M. Richards (Wild Rose) — Projet de loi intitulé « Loi modifiant le Code criminel (dissimulation d’identité) ».


MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
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reply to MaynardKrebs

Here's another little beauty about changes to PIPEDA

»www.parl.gc.ca/LegisInfo/BillDet···5&Mode=1

(12) Section 7 of the Act is amended by adding the following after subsection (3):


Lawful authority

(3.1) For greater certainty, for the purpose of paragraph (3)(c.1)

(a) lawful authority refers to lawful authority other than
-- (i) a subpoena or warrant issued, or an order made, by a court, person or body with jurisdiction to compel the production of information, or
-- (ii) rules of court relating to the production of records; and

(b) the organization that discloses the per­sonal information is not required to verify the validity of the lawful authority identified by the government institution or the part of a government institution.


Paragraph 7(3)(c.1) of the Act is amended by striking out “or” at the end of subparagraph (ii) and by adding the following after subparagraph (iii):

......., or

(v) the disclosure is requested for the purpose of performing policing services that are not referred to in subparagraph (i), (ii) or (iv);

-----------------------

7(3)(c.1)(v) is a loophole big enough to drive a Challenger jet with Peter MacKay on-board through -- if it were me being asked to produce anything, I'd be demanding written verification, otherwise it might just be a cop in the service of a political party or a fed with a grudge against somebody .

-----------------------


»www.huffingtonpost.ca/2011/09/30···027.html

But what has privacy experts worried is a new provision that allows organizations to hand over personal information about individuals to law enforcement and private investigators without a warrant. And, when the law enforcement agency requests it, the organization can be forbidden from notifying the individual in question that their information has been passed on.

It’s that secrecy clause that has some privacy experts comparing the PIPEDA amendment to the USA Patriot Act, a massive law passed with little debate in the wake of the 9/11 attacks that civil liberties advocates have criticized as being a major expansion of the U.S. government’s ability to spy on private citizens.

"This particular amendment appears to create a provision similar to those in the USA Patriot Act," Vincent Gogolek, executive director of the B.C. Freedom of Information and Privacy Association, told CBC. He described the bill as containing “some real dangers.”

---------------------

»www.marketwatch.com/story/govern···11-09-29

Proposed amendments would make it clear that organizations may collaborate with government institutions, such as law enforcement and security agencies that have requested personal information, in the absence of a warrant, subpoena, or order.


MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
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reply to MaynardKrebs

An ISP who stands up for its customers
»Sonic.net Fought For Tor Developer's Rights



TwiztedZero
Nine Zero Burp Nine Six
Premium
join:2011-03-31
Toronto, ON
kudos:5

said by MaynardKrebs:

An ISP who stands up for its customers
»Sonic.net Fought For Tor Developer's Rights

Aye, read that y'day too... and they do seem to be kindred spirits with how we envision TekSavvy, at least I'm hopeful.
--
You see there is only one constant. One universal. It is the only real truth. Causality. Action, reaction. Cause and effect.
-Motorola SB6120-1.0.6.1 + Netgear RangeMax WNDR3700v1 + Dupont POI + eXtreme Cable Pr0



Clarified

@videotron.ca

Laws of the 21st century: Access legislation clarified
»news.nationalpost.com/2011/10/22···arified/


MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
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»news.nationalpost.com/2011/10/22···arified/

"The act would also give the RCMP and CSIS the authority to conduct background security checks on any employees who are involved in intercepting communications."

--- So, if you were a small-time ISP and none of your employees passed the background check - would you be required to assist? or would you be required to fire your employees?

"Mr. Stamatakis said this sort of additional power would be exercised to investigate only the most serious crimes, including child pornography, organized crime and terrorism."

Or criticism of the government.



elwoodblues
Elwood Blues
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Somewhere in
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Reviews:
·VMedia

said by MaynardKrebs:

»news.nationalpost.com/2011/10/22···arified/

"The act would also give the RCMP and CSIS the authority to conduct background security checks on any employees who are involved in intercepting communications."

--- So, if you were a small-time ISP and none of your employees passed the background check - would you be required to assist? or would you be required to fire your employees?

"Mr. Stamatakis said this sort of additional power would be exercised to investigate only the most serious crimes, including child pornography, organized crime and terrorism."

Or criticism of the government.

Yes indeed, Herr Harper cannot take criticism very well.
--
It's got a cop motor, a 440 cubic inch plant, it's got cop tires, cop suspensions, cop shocks. It's a model made before catalytic converters so it'll run good on regular gas. What do you say, is it the new Bluesmobile or what?

MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
Premium
join:2009-06-17
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reply to MaynardKrebs

Privacy Commissioner weighs in

Privacy watchdog sounds alarm on Conservative e-snooping legislation
»www.theglobeandmail.com/news/pol···2215907/

Privacy watchdog urges caution in beefing up surveillance measures
»www.thestar.com/news/canada/poli···measures



le wut

@videotron.ca

Why lawful access legislation should not be allowed
»blog.privacylawyer.ca/2011/10/wh···uld.html

Privacy Commissioner Ann Cavoukian: Privacy invasion shouldn’t be ‘lawful’
»fullcomment.nationalpost.com/201···2%80%99/


jfmezei
Premium
join:2007-01-03
Pointe-Claire, QC
kudos:23

Ontario Privacy Commissioner's letter to the Minister on Lawfull Access:

»t.co/Cm3teZu1

(leads to a .pdf document, as tweeted by Michael Geist)



Link Fixer

@videotron.ca

said by jfmezei:

Ontario Privacy Commissioner's letter to the Minister on Lawfull Access:

»t.co/Cm3teZu1

(leads to a .pdf document, as tweeted by Michael Geist)

The link you provide gives a 404.

The correct link should be:

»www.ipc.on.ca/images/WhatsNew/20···ance.pdf


Round 3

@videotron.ca

Ontario Information and Privacy Commissioner call out the Public Safety Ministers' and Harpers' lies on "lawful access"

»www.nationalpost.com/news/Privac···ory.html

I must correct the inaccuracies in Minister Vic Toews' letter.

The proposed surveillance bills will capture information that bears little resemblance to "phone book information." The public does not have access to this information, nor should they - it goes far beyond address and phone number. Consider just one of the new threats to our fundamental freedoms: police could force telecoms to provide the name, address and unique device number of people (enabling online tracking) who posted comments on newspapers' websites under pseudonyms - without a warrant, without explanation and in secret. This should only be accessible through a courtordered, judicial warrant. This is unacceptable: 88 pages of new powers, without matching judicial safeguards.

One of the many complexities glossed over, the government's surveillance capacity, risks transforming telecoms into agents of the state. Much of our online activity is an extension of our in-home personal life. Everyone wants to stop child predators, but responding to this by eroding our online privacy illustrates a dated zero-sum mentality. Subjecting innocent individuals to unwarranted surveillance can have devastating consequences. Properly designed powers can assist law enforcement and also respect the rights of ordinary Canadians - we must have both. We must resist any further erosion of our fundamental freedoms and liberty.

Ann Cavoukian, Information and Privacy Commissioner, Ontario.


Will he reply, or run and hide and pretend not to have seen anything?