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MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
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join:2009-06-17
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reply to slivers

Re: Facebook Identity Card

With all the sheep that use Facebook & Twitter, the Gubbmint will soon just focus in on those that don't -- figuring that they are the ones with the most to hide.


MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
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Conservatives in minority on Bill C-30

Poll Finds Majority Of Canadians Think Tories' Online Surveillance Bill Shouldn't Become Law
»www.huffingtonpost.ca/2012/02/28···f=canada

A majority of Canadians think that the Conservatives’ proposed online surveillance Bill C-30 is too intrusive and should be defeated, according to a poll by Angus-Reid.

The poll, conducted February 23-24 and surveying 1,011 respondents on the polling firm’s online panel, found 53 per cent of Canadians believe the bill is too intrusive, compared to only 27 per cent who believe the it is necessary to fight online criminal activity.

Even a plurality of Conservative voters, or 47 per cent, thinks that the bill has gone too far. And considering that opposition to the bill is strongest in the Tory-heartland of Alberta, where 66 per cent of respondents said it was too intrusive, it is not surprising that the Conservative government has backed away from strongly supporting the proposed legislation.



Mister M

join:2010-05-01
Vancouver, BC

said by MaynardKrebs:

...The poll, conducted February 23-24 and surveying 1,011 respondents on the polling firm’s online panel, found 53 per cent of Canadians believe the bill is too intrusive, compared to only 27 per cent who believe the it is necessary to fight online criminal activity...

Simply jaw-dropping.

Testament to the incredible ignorance of a very large portion of our society.


PierrePoutin

@videotron.ca

said by Mister M:

Testament to the incredible ignorance of a very large portion of our society.

Indeedy. They believe what the GOC tells them.


Ott_Cable

@teksavvy.com

A non-trusting government is one that is not trustworthy.


jfmezei
Premium
join:2007-01-03
Pointe-Claire, QC
kudos:23

Had a short chat with the ministry offices today. The bill is essentially frozen right now. They told me to keep checking on the bill's status to find out when consultations would begin.

I suspect this time period is used to allow the realy lobbying to happen.


MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
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Re: Lawful Access articles - collection

The Issues Surrounding Subscriber Information in Bill C-30
»www.christopher-parsons.com/blog···ll-c-30/

"Despite being an extremely lengthy piece of legislation, Bill C-30 lacks the specificity that should accompany serious expansions to Canadian policing and intelligence gathering powers.

In this post, I first outline a ‘subscriber data regime’ to discuss what does – and may – be entailed in accessing Canadians’ subscriber data. Second, I explain how subscriber data can be used for open-sourced intelligence gathering. Third, I argue that an administrative process of expanding subscriber identifiers is inappropriate. Finally, I articulate why warrants are so important, and why court approval should precede access to subscriber data. In aggregate, this post explicates the concerns that many civil advocates, academics, and technical experts have with access to subscriber information, why Canadians should be mindful of these concerns, and why Canadians should rebuff current efforts to expand warrantless access to subscriber information.

....

Imagine that your IP address has been turned over by a web forum that predominantly communicates about your local Occupy movement. With the IP in hand, the authorities (a) go to your ISP to identify you as an individual; (b) identify that on Wikipedia you have been editing articles on firebombs, chemical explosives, anarchism, black block tactics, and academic freedom. While this might suggest that you are ‘of interest’ to police – and thus worth monitoring, if not charging with a specific criminal offence – it might mask the truth that you are really a graduate student who is a subject matter expert on militant advocacy in Canada. You’ve been profiled based on actions online, with certain conclusions derived from your online behaviour that would not bear out were you subject to a specific investigation. While some of the confusion might ‘work itself out’ in a court process, should you simply be monitored this profile could develop and build over time. This inappropriate characterization could lead to serious life consequences as the hidden profile influences your relations with the state over months or years."
[You could find yourself on an international Do-Not-Fly list, a quiet word could be whispered to deny you a job, ....or worse if you manage to cross a border someplace where they practice extrajudicial detention & interrogation]


MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
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A collection of article article on 'fishing' expeditions.
Add C-30 to the mix and what do you get?

Known to Police
»www.thestar.com/specialsections/···topolice


MaynardKrebs
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So we have this article on what the NSA is gathering up
»www.wired.com/threatlevel/2012/0···er/all/1

He explains that the agency could have installed its tapping gear at the nation’s cable landing stations—the more than two dozen sites on the periphery of the US where fiber-optic cables come ashore. If it had taken that route, the NSA would have been able to limit its eavesdropping to just international communications, which at the time was all that was allowed under US law. Instead it chose to put the wiretapping rooms at key junction points throughout the country—large, windowless buildings known as switches—thus gaining access to not just international communications but also to most of the domestic traffic flowing through the US. The network of intercept stations goes far beyond the single room in an AT&T building in San Francisco exposed by a whistle-blower in 2006. “I think there’s 10 to 20 of them,” Binney says. “That’s not just San Francisco; they have them in the middle of the country and also on the East Coast.”

The eavesdropping on Americans doesn’t stop at the telecom switches. To capture satellite communications in and out of the US, the agency also monitors AT&T’s powerful earth stations, satellite receivers in locations that include Roaring Creek and Salt Creek. Tucked away on a back road in rural Catawissa, Pennsylvania, Roaring Creek’s three 105-foot dishes handle much of the country’s communications to and from Europe and the Middle East. And on an isolated stretch of land in remote Arbuckle, California, three similar dishes at the company’s Salt Creek station service the Pacific Rim and Asia.


Since the NSA scoops up everything that crosses the US border, and since much of Rogers & Sympatico carried e-mail & other traffic crosses into the US before it is re-routed back into Canada, a simple and cost-effective solution to this

[Police] Recommended "Public Safety" Tax on Internet
»[Police] Recommended "Public Safety" Tax on Internet B

would to simply require all Canadian ISP's to route all traffic into the US before delivering it back into Canada.

That way the NSA can store everything for us at no cost. ISP's here won't have to spend a cent, and the government won't have to buy all kinds of expensive hardware & software.

CSIS, the RCMP, and the CPC can then work with their buddies south of the border without public scrutiny at creating Stasi-like dossiers on everyone in Canada.


MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
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Contrast and compare with Bill C-30

»www.theglobeandmail.com/news/nat···2401185/

The Supreme Court of Canada has struck down a wiretap exception police use in emergency situations on the basis that it contains no provision for notifying targets that they were under surveillance.


MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
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Ann Cavoukian Urges 'Vigilance' Against Bill C-30

Ontario Privacy Commissioner Ann Cavoukian Urges 'Vigilance' Against Bill C-30
»www.huffingtonpost.ca/2012/06/05···politics

In a report entitled “Ever Vigilant,” released Monday, Cavoukian described the proposed legislation as “one of the most invasive threats to our privacy and freedom that I have ever encountered.”

The report is here
»www.ipc.on.ca/images/Resources/2···port.pdf



elwoodblues
Elwood Blues
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Somewhere in
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reply to MaynardKrebs

Re: Lawful Access articles - collection

She must be hiding something.


MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
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reply to MaynardKrebs

Britain’s government chooses security over liberty with Internet spying plan
»fullcomment.nationalpost.com/201···ng-plan/

In the 2005 movie V for Vendetta (based on the comic book of the same name), the Conservative Party in the U.K. cements its hold on power following a terrorist attack, which turns out to be an inside job. In order to maintain control, the government institutes strict censorship laws and sends secret police — known as “Fingermen” — out to patrol streets in surveillance vans that allow them to listen in on the private conversations taking place within people’s homes. Apparently, British Prime Minister David Cameron saw this work as a policy document, rather than dystopian science fiction.

....

Under the new proposal, the government would have the ability to monitor and track everyone’s Internet and phone usage, including the web sites people visit and who they communicate with. Although police and intelligence agents would not have the ability to eavesdrop on conversations directly, they would be able to compile data on who they contact and what they do online. [ The Brits must have compared notes with Vic "Babysitter Banger" Toews ]


DanteX

join:2010-09-09
kudos:1

The Uk cant even afford to help keep children and those in need out of poverty as there is no money available, How are they going to find money for this 3billion pound program?


MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
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Same way as it'll be done here - tax cuts for the wealthy, and cutting of useful government services - like Statscan, DFO, CSIS Oversight, etc...


MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
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And little Stevie "Me Too, Me Too" Harper

A Note to Congress: The United Nations Isn't a Serious Threat to Internet Freedom—But You Are
»www.theatlantic.com/technology/a···/258709/

"The reality is that Congress Parliament increasingly has its paws all over the Internet. Lawmakers and regulators are busier than ever trying to expand the horizons of cyber-control across the board: copyright mandates, cybersecurity rules, privacy regulations, speech controls, and much more."


MaynardKrebs
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Bill C-30 - Vic "Babysitter Banger" Toews is at it aga

»www.cbc.ca/news/politics/story/2···ill.html

The controversial online surveillance Bill C-30 would help police catch criminal suspects such as Luka Rocco Magnotta more quickly, according to briefing notes for Public Safety Minister Vic Toews prepared in the aftermath of the gruesome killing of Jun Lin.

The documents drawing a link with the Magnotta case and Bill C-30 were drafted and circulated by senior officials June 4 — the same day the suspect was arrested in Berlin and more than a week after the crime occurred.

.....

Under the heading: "Could Bill C-30 have helped locate [suspect] Luka Rocco Magnotta earlier?" two memorandums decline to comment on specifics of the investigation because it is continuing, but go on to say the bill "would provide police with tools that could prove useful in similar cases."

"Bill C-30 would give authorities quicker, more reliable access to electronic information that can help catch criminals faster, which would be especially useful in cases where the suspect intends to flee or seriously harm another individual," it reads.

.....

The document package also includes an email circulated to government officials containing a blog posting by internet specialist Michael Geist, a law professor at the University of Ottawa.

At the time the story was developing, Toews said C-30 would be useful and relevant in such cases, but declined to comment specifically on the potential merits of the bill for the Magnotta case.

But Geist disputes the proposed internet surveillance legislation would have anything to do with a case like Magnotta's.

"By the time the evidence began to accumulate, he was already in Europe," Geist told CBC News. "The claim that C-30 would have made a difference is simply false — there is no evidence that law enforcement ran into problems tracking down his location to Europe and ultimately making the arrest."

......

As for the specific four claims made in the documents, Geist says there is "far less than meets the eye." He notes:

ISPs already disclose subscriber information 94 per cent of the time without a court order. For the remainder, there is no evidence that obtaining a warrant for this kind of case poses a problem.
A preservation order still requires a warrant — it is not immediate as suggested in the Q&A documents.
There is no evidence that there are delays in obtaining warrants.


slivers

join:2009-08-28
Canada

It keeps on going and going and going...

CSIS advising Toews on online surveillance bill

»www.cbc.ca/news/technology/story···den.html

Expand your moderator at work

MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
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reply to MaynardKrebs

Re: Lawful Access articles - collection

Online Spying Bill: Privacy Czar Tries To Broker Internet Surveillance Compromise
»www.theglobeandmail.com/news/pol···7033343/
»www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/01/08···855.html

The federal privacy watchdog is trying to help the Conservative government find a compromise in its contentious bid to bolster Internet surveillance powers.

A blueprint solicited by the privacy commissioner's office proposes new procedures to give police and spies key information about Internet users while retaining the principle of judicial oversight, a memo obtained under the Access to Information Act shows.....

The federal legislation would allow police, intelligence and Competition Bureau officers access to Internet subscriber information — including name, address, telephone number, email address and Internet protocol address — without a warrant. An IP address is the numeric label assigned to a computer on the Internet.

Currently, release of such data, held by Internet service providers, is voluntary.

-----

Hell, the government doesn't need C-30 .... they can get the information by simply claiming a copyright violation just like Voltage has done. Presto, chango, hand over the information right f!cking now.


MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
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Privacy watchdog seeking compromise for Tories’ Internet surveillance bill
»business.financialpost.com/2013/···ce-bill/

....Benyekhlef, a former federal prosecutor who is now director of the university’s Centre de Recherche en Droit Public, concludes that the federal bill is inconsistent with the Charter of Rights because it allows warrantless access to subscriber information.

“There is tradition in Canadian law that the state must have a warrant before exercising its search or seizure powers,” Benyekhlef said in an interview.

He proposes a five-step process in which the authorities would first apply to a court for an order seeking subscriber data. This could be done in person, by paper or on the phone.

A judge or justice of the peace would review the application to ensure it sets out “reasonable suspicion” that the Criminal Code or other federal law has been breached and that the information sought relates to the alleged offence.

If the application conditions are met, a signed order would be provided to the investigator, who could then present it to the legal division of an Internet provider. The provider would then be required to hand the investigator the data and maintain a record of the transaction.

The privacy commissioner’s analysis of the proposal points out its similarity to the production order powers currently available to authorities seeking financial and commercial information, in place since 2004.


---

My concern is that so far there has been no discussion of monitoring ANY system such as this proposal, or indeed any other, for serious or systemic abuses by the Feds, law enforcement, or a too cozy relationship with any judge or JP. There needs to be some sort of 'sunlight' clause in any legislation which permits the public/newspapers/etc... to see what is going on, and who is doing it, and how often, and for what types of cases.

In fact, I see the option of including Justices of the Peace as warrant issuing authorities as problematic. I would want the warrant issuance limited to judges.

I would also expect ISP's to 'man-up' and post monthly stats on their own web sites as to the number of warrant (or without warrant) disclosures of customer information, by province, and maybe by city - so we can have a view into the frequency & locations of such requests.


MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
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»www.christopher-parsons.com/blog···tercept/

Lawful Access is Dead; Long Live Lawful Intercept!

Most recently, the politics surrounding C-30 led to the death of the bill, though aspects of it have already crept into other pieces of federal legislation. While Canadians and advocates have arguably been successful in repelling lawful access (again), it’s important to recognize that some facets of the legislation were migrated outside of the Parliament many months ago. The death of C-30 does not mean that non-Parliamentary processes will similarly be killed. Specifically, facets of the lawful access legislation have been advanced by Industry Canada during the Department’s 700MHz consultation under the guise of modernizing lawful intercept capabilities.

...the CWTA wrote that

there has been no enabling legislation passed by Parliament that would require such services be intercepted, and submits that it is inappropriate for the Department to impose such requirements via a COL –particularly at a time when the Government is engaged in a legislative process covering the lawful access issue at a broader level. The COL should reflect the legislative requirements that exist at the time the licences are issued, and not be crafted in anticipation of legislative requirements that may or may not be in force at some point in the future.

Other carriers, such as Eastlink, Wind, MTS Allstream, Quebecor, Rogers, TBayTel, and TELUS shared sentiments similar to Bell’s and the CWTA’s. The CWTA’s comments are especially poignant in light of the government’s retreat from Bill C-30: lawful access has been largely dropped, but this has not corresponded with statements from Industry Canada or Public Safety indicating that either Department is stepping away from modernizing lawful interception requirements.

Data flowing from USB HSPA+ modems would be subject to lawful intercept, as would data linked to tethered mobile phones, as would email, text messages, an other communications emitted directly from mobile devices. In essence, the government wants carriers to be capable of preserving any data that is received by, or transmitted from, wireless devices that use licensed spectrum.

The changes that are proposed by Industry Canada represent a significant expansion of what communications could be placed under surveillance. There is a qualitative and quantitative difference between circuit-based and radio-based communications, insofar as entirely new means of communication may be captured (e.g. email, streaming music and video usage, TV-watching, gaming over wireless networks, etc) and more communication potentially falls under the auspice of this requirement because of the broad definition of ‘radio-based’. Thus, whereas carriers previously had a limited set of clear interception requirements, this simple change in language would substantially expand what they would be required to be able to intercept and preserve.


MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
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reply to MaynardKrebs

Online Spying Bill Would Have Given Police Power To Find Out All About You: Privacy Commissioner
»www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/05/22···994.html

The Harper government's recent bid to give police more information about Internet users would have unlocked numerous revealing personal details — from web-surfing habits to names of friends, says a new study by the federal privacy watchdog.

The online surveillance bill was effectively a digital key to determining someone's leanings, the people they know and where they travel, says the office of Privacy Commissioner Jennifer Stoddart.

....

The privacy commissioner's study, initiated while the bill was still before Parliament, says the government's characterization "grossly misconstrues and underestimates" what can be gleaned from the data with a bit of additional effort.

"In general, the findings lead to the conclusion that, unlike simple phone book information, the elements examined can be used to develop very detailed portraits of individuals providing insight into one's activities, tastes, leanings and lives."