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dahan

join:2000-10-25
Leander, TX

1 recommendation

reply to dave006

Re: FCC complaint against AT&T deceptive advertising 24Mbps

said by dave006:

It means Fiber To The Premises over IP (FTTPIP).

That may be what the acronym stands for, but it isn't what it means, unless AT&T has figured out how to encapsulate pieces of glass into an IP packet. Seriously? Fiber over IP?

So, what does FTTPIP mean?

dave006

join:1999-12-26
Boca Raton, FL
It is very simple but since you can't figure it out, I will spell it out for you.

Fiber To The Premises over IP (FTTPIP) - That means that only IP based video, high speed internet and voice services (VoIP) are available.

Dave

ConstantineM

join:2011-09-02
San Jose, CA
said by dave006:

It is very simple but since you can't figure it out, I will spell it out for you.

Fiber To The Premises over IP (FTTPIP) - That means that only IP based video, high speed internet and voice services (VoIP) are available.

Dave

You're kidding us, right? Because you can't possibly be serious!

Have you heard of the V return for FEP? The V option is for FTTP-P, Fibre to the Premises over Pigeons. It's what all the new greenfield would be getting very soon; it's in testing and qualification right now. Dave, I guess you don't know all the answers about FTTP and U-verse just yet!

BTW, with AT&T BPON, speed offerings (and tech-savvy customer satisfaction) are subpar in all markets compared to all the competition (whether that be Verizon BPON in other markets or the cableco within U-verse coverage), and they're subpar for a reason. Do a little research.

Constantine.


dahan

join:2000-10-25
Leander, TX

1 recommendation

reply to dave006
Well excuse me for not instantly understanding some made-up term that doesn't actually make sense. It sounds like what you're talking about is IP over FTTP, not FTTP over IP. Even Google has never heard of "Fiber to the premises over IP"; the only hits it comes up with are this thread and the document you copy/pasted your post from. It's definitely not a term used in the industry.

Ummm

join:2011-10-26
united state
FTTP-IP is AT&T's name for the transport type that covers all existing U-Verse fiber customers. Because this is a discussion of U-Verse it's an appropriate forum in which to use ATT nomenclature.

dave006

join:1999-12-26
Boca Raton, FL
said by Ummm:

We have a winner that can understand AT&T internal system terms.

For the others, you asked about is and now you know what it is and what it means in context in terms of AT&T and for U-verse Service at a particular Service Address. Have a nice day.

There has been so much discussion about and F-Ticket and facility qualification, I thought it made sense to share the way the system indicates what facilities are avalable at a given service address. You don't have to like it or even understand it but that's the facts.

Dave


dahan

join:2000-10-25
Leander, TX
reply to Ummm
said by Ummm:

FTTP-IP is AT&T's name for the transport type that covers all existing U-Verse fiber customers. Because this is a discussion of U-Verse it's an appropriate forum in which to use ATT nomenclature.

Using AT&T nomenclature is fine; however, claiming that it's "very simple", but I "can't figure it out" when asked for an explanation isn't.


dslfan90

@sbcglobal.net
Just because you and one other person can't figure it out, doesn't mean that others on the forum can't figure it out.


Metatron2008
Premium
join:2008-09-02
united state
Who the hell can figure out obtuse made up terms? Ask any IT guy what the hell FTTP-IP means and you'd probably get the same answer.


dslfan90

@sbcglobal.net
The information provided by dave006 was "Fiber To The Premises over IP (FTTPIP)" not just FTTP-IP.

ConstantineM

join:2011-09-02
San Jose, CA
reply to Metatron2008

In Soviet Russia...

.
At Verizon, you get IP over Fibre.
At AT&T, you get Fibre over IP!
»twitter.com/Mcnst/status/1345344 ··· 37645312

PLZ RETWEET!!!

dave006

join:1999-12-26
Boca Raton, FL
reply to dahan

Re: FCC complaint against AT&T deceptive advertising 24Mbps

Nope my quote came from the AT&T standard Local Service Pre-Ordering Requirements document (LSPOR).

The LSPOR has been created to aid the local wholesale
customer in verifying pre-ordering information in advance of submitting local service requests (LSRs) for the eXtensible Markup Language (XML) OSS interface. It describes the inputs and
outputs associated with pre-ordering for Residence and Business accounts.

The Facility Environment Provisioned Description: Identifies the type of facility serving the end user location. The FEP is the key to what you can get at your service address.

Dave

Ummm

join:2011-10-26
united state
There are a hell of a lot of AT&T employees on the forum. We are from the tech side, we're not marketing weasels trying to sell you the company line. We're all extremely aware of the limitations of U-Verse, and are by no means apologists for AT&Ts cheapness/short term thinking/stupidity.

It's also unfair to assume that non employees will know AT&T jargon. Ya'll need to chill and not snap at each other.


dahan

join:2000-10-25
Leander, TX
reply to dslfan90
said by dslfan90 :

The information provided by dave006 was "Fiber To The Premises over IP (FTTPIP)" not just FTTP-IP.

That makes it worse, not better. I could hazard a guess as to what FTTP-IP means, and in this case, I'd be right (it'd still be a guess though, and I don't see any problem with asking for what the term actually means). But when you expand it to "Fiber To The Premises over IP", that doesn't even make any sense. AT&T isn't providing fiber to anywhere over IP. 'cuz, you know, IP is a protocol for sending bits around, and can't provide a physical object like fiber?

Again, if AT&T has weird terminology and y'all want to use it, go ahead. But don't act all snooty when asked to define your terms.


dslfan90

@sbcglobal.net
You didn't simply ask him to define it, you felt the need to make this comment:

"That may be what the acronym stands for, but it isn't what it means, unless AT&T has figured out how to encapsulate pieces of glass into an IP packet. Seriously? Fiber over IP?"

Snooty comment?

ConstantineM

join:2011-09-02
San Jose, CA

The "FTTP-IP" offtopic summary and conclusion.

said by dslfan90 :

You didn't simply ask him to define it, you felt the need to make this comment:

"That may be what the acronym stands for, but it isn't what it means, unless AT&T has figured out how to encapsulate pieces of glass into an IP packet. Seriously? Fiber over IP?"

Snooty comment?

dslfan90 (anon), would you mind explaining why "FTTP-IP", whatever it means, is even relevant in this conversation, and what is it a nomenclature for? Again, noone has any idea what it means, yet you and the other AT&T guys have spent a whole page with snooty comments against me, dahan and Metatron2008.

Dave006, dslfan90 (anon) and Ummm, can you guys please get back on the topic? Instead of resorting to confusing everyone with nomenclature that doesn't actually mean anything to anyone, could you guys please address this last question that was relevant to the thread? »Re: FCC complaint against AT&T deceptive advertising 24Mbps

Let's briefly recall how user "Ummm" addressed it instead: he brought this undefined FTTP-IP term on the previous page, saying that "FTTP-IP customers are hosed", and mentioning FTTP-GPON. One full page later with many comments from the AT&T guys, and several non-AT&T people combined, noone still has any idea what Ummm meant by FTTP-IP, what's GPON status at AT&T (or why it's even needed in light of BPON still being terribly underprovisioned with lots of unused potential) or what was prior to BPON 622/155 1:32 that's holding AT&T back from providing decent service to customers like myself that have the above-mentioned BPON that does not support overall downstream slower than 622Mbps and can only be shared with a maximum of 32 users, with full overprovisioning support, of course.

As a moderator of this discussion, I would sincerely ask the AT&T guys to stop the "FTTP-IP" bs, and get back to the topic.

And let's recall where we're left off. The BPON 622/155 1:32 equipment (which I have) can easily support HSI speeds on the order of 64/8 or even as high as 100/25 or something (remember, uptake is never 100%; and even if it was overly affordable, few users saturate their connection all the time anyways). Doesn't Verizon offer 25/25 and 50/20 over essentially the very same 622/155 BPON as AT&T has? Because it would appear that it does! (With Verizon GPON, you get 150/75! Is AT&T planning to offer similar speeds with their GPON?) Why am I only getting 18/1.5, whereas Verizon customers get 25/25 service within the same price range and with equipment of the same generation and with the same underlying BPON technology? What's holding AT&T back from honouring their own 24Mbps price list offering on my 622/155 1:32 BPON? It's still hilarious to know that even copper customers at AT&T can get 24/3!

And just to re-cap: noone in their right mind has any idea what is "A = Fiber To The Premises (FTTP)" and "B = Fiber To The Premises over IP (FTTPIP)". Those terms could mean anything. What do they stand for? What's even the difference? What am I, or dahan, or Metatron2008, or I'm sure many other readers, fail to understand here, that is apparently so crystal clear to every single AT&T employee?


dahan

join:2000-10-25
Leander, TX
reply to dslfan90

Re: FCC complaint against AT&T deceptive advertising 24Mbps

I didn't ask him to define it, ConstantineM did: "What's FTTP-IP?". To which dave006 replied with a non-answer. And I guess I get jumped on for daring to point that out.


Metatron2008
Premium
join:2008-09-02
united state
Maybe Fiber to the Ip is something like this?

»British Telecom Announces Fiber To The Press Release
Expand your moderator at work