dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
98
share rss forum feed


goalieskates
Premium
join:2004-09-12
land of big

2 edits

1 recommendation

reply to chrisretusn

Re: Facebook now wants your personal phone number....

said by chrisretusn:

Not seeing that here.

Yet, maybe?

According to Facebook help you need to provide your phone number to "verify" your account.

Which I wouldn't do, but then, I don't have FB either.


dandelion
Premium,MVM
join:2003-04-29
Germantown, TN
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Comcast
said by goalieskates:

According to Facebook help you need to provide your phone number to "verify" your account.

Which I wouldn't do, but then, I don't have FB either.

Doesn't say it is mandatory though according to the link "After you confirm your email address, you can verify your account. Verifying your account gives you the ability to do more on Facebook, like register a username."
--
Spare computer cycles can help find answers
Find A Cure!



chrisretusn
Retired
Premium
join:2007-08-13
Philippines
kudos:1
Reviews:
·PLDT
·Comcast
said by dandelion:

Doesn't say it is mandatory though according to the link "After you confirm your email address, you can verify your account. Verifying your account gives you the ability to do more on Facebook, like register a username."

It may not say it's mandatory but the screen shot posted by the OP doesn't show and option to skip it. I've been asked to provide my mobile number but not like this and I was given a choice to opt-out of that.

I've registered a username, no mobile number required. That option became available a couple of weeks after joining Facebook.
--
Chris
Living in Paradise!!

dave
Premium,MVM
join:2000-05-04
not in ohio
kudos:8
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
reply to goalieskates
said by goalieskates:

said by chrisretusn:

Not seeing that here.

Yet, maybe?

According to Facebook help you need to provide your phone number to "verify" your account.

Which I wouldn't do, but then, I don't have FB either.

It looks to me like they need the phone number iff you desire to verify your account with SMS. That, on the surface, looks reasonable - you want to use a phone to verify this account, so which phone do you want to use?

If you don't want them to know your phone number, verify by email.

I am not now, nor have I ever been, a Facebook user. But I can read.


Krisnatharok
Caveat Emptor
Premium
join:2009-02-11
Earth Orbit
kudos:12
Agreed. With the number of massive hacks on the rise, it makes sense to be able to verify something outside of Facebook. Many people have lower tiered accounts compromised--say an email address and password.

The hackers then try that email and password in many different sites--many of us utilize the same password between sites (but shouldn't).

If you don't want to verify via SMS, don't. But it's a useful tool to have should you lose control of your email account.
--
If we lose this freedom of ours, history will record with the greatest astonishment, those who had the most to lose, did the least to prevent its happening.

Mele20
Premium
join:2001-06-05
Hilo, HI
kudos:5
What do you mean by "lower tiered accounts"? How is an ISP's email account "lower tiered" than what?

I have not ever heard of my ISP's mail servers being hacked and my mail accounts (6-7 I think I have) being compromised. I've had this ISP for over 10 years.

Surely you don't mean that you believe a lot of users use the same passwords they have for their various ISP's mail accounts, where there has to be a different password for each email account, on websites like here for login? And because of "massive hacks" those websites are compromised and the user's password is gotten and somehow the hacker associates that password with the user's ISP's email account that stupidly uses the same password? How would the hacker know what email account the user had?

I'm not following your reasoning. I mean, your email password from one of your 10 or more accounts (my ISP allows us 10 accounts for standard Road Runner and if I upgrade to Turbo I think I get 25 email accounts) would never be your password on a website where you registered with one exception if you used your email account here at dslr! I don't remember a SINGLE one of my email accounts passwords for all the accounts I have with my ISP. They are automatically remembered by Outlook Express, Opera mail, and SeaMonkey mail so how could I use any of them as login for a website where I gave that email address? I'd have to go fish out the written record of the passwords. What a hassle. I wouldn't do that besides it is stupid to do that. I'm not following your reasoning at all.

I don't have a Facebook account. I block Facebook in HostsMan but if I had one I would never give my unlisted, unpublished phone number to Facebook. If I had an account it would all be lies anyway so I wouldn't care if it couldn't be verified.
--
When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. Thomas Jefferson


NetFixer
Bah Humbug
Premium
join:2004-06-24
The Boro
Reviews:
·Cingular Wireless
·Comcast Business..
·Vonage
Not everyone is as conscientious about privacy and security as you, Mele. Many people do indeed reuse the same passwords for multiple unrelated accounts, and also reuse login names for multiple accounts (not just email accounts).

Also, you are forgetting about OpenID which allows one username/password for accessing many different sites and email accounts ("One ring to rule them all" comes to mind). This site uses OpenID for those who want to use it.




Normally, I don't see the OpenID login for this site because the server to which it connects is blocked by NoScript, but I temporarily allowed it to show so I could get the screen shot. I don't know if FB is a member of OpenID, and since I don't have a FB account (and can't access the site because my perimeter firewall blocks it), I can't find out. My guess would be that FB is a member since that is exactly the kind of sharing that drives that site.
--
A well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.


chrisretusn
Retired
Premium
join:2007-08-13
Philippines
kudos:1
Reviews:
·PLDT
·Comcast
reply to Mele20
I am trying to figure out were ISP was mentioned in Krisnatharok See Profile's post.
--
Chris
Living in Paradise!!

Mele20
Premium
join:2001-06-05
Hilo, HI
kudos:5
He didn't mention ISPs. He said email accounts were an example of lowered tiered accounts. I didn't understand that. To me, most email accounts are ISP email accounts and that is why I challenged his comment that ISP email accounts are massively hacked. I don't think they are.

As for OpenID, I don't see how that could be used to login into your ISP's say 10 to 25 email accounts that you have set up. I have to set up each email account I have (including my dslr email account) in OE, in SeaMonkey mail, and in Opera mail and I have to supply the password for each account when setting it up in these email clients that I use. I can't use any password for dslr mail except my dslr site password. As for my ISP's email accounts (10-25 available based on either standard or Turbo speed), I had to supply a password for each account when setting it up in Road Runner Member accounts page. The Master RR email account is never used as it has the user's name in it rendering it useless if you are the least bit privacy conscious as you cannot change that master account to remove your name and id from it. How would I use OpenID as a password for each of these accounts? It is not possible. I never type the passwords after setting up each account. My browsers that have email clients and Outlook Express remember the passwords. I avoid like the plague having to use RR webmail which AWFUL. I use SeaMonkey, Opera, and OE mail and I get all accounts including dslr in those email clients.

I still don't know what he is getting at and that is why I asked. Why would I need OpenID for email accounts? And how would OpenID make it easier than it already is to have SeaMonkey, Opera or OE check for new mail? I guess my puzzlement is due to his saying email accounts are "lower tier" and thus prone to hacking. My ISP has never had email accounts hacked as far as I know (although DSLR has been hacked and I am so thankful I was not one of the victims and I wish Justin would follow through on his promise to fix it since my password here is the same as my dslr mail password and we can't have a different password for dslr mail) and what does "lower tier" mean?

My point to him was that if you only type your ISP's mail accounts passwords when you first set them up and then you have your email clients (be that OE or web browsers, etc) remember them for you why would you ever be tempted to use them as your login on some website? I don't understand that at all. The only way a hacker could get your various ISP email account passwords would be if he/she hacked Road Runner gateway email servers or hacked RoadRunner User Accounts. I have never heard of that happening. I can see though if you have an email account here at dslr AND you used your dslr password at other sites then, sure, you could be in a world of trouble because Justin has still not fixed the problem. But how many people have email accounts at dslr and of those when this site was hacked most who posted in the thread about it said they did NOT reuse their password here anywhere else partly because it is same password for email here as for the site itself and it would be stupid to reuse it.
--
When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. Thomas Jefferson

dave
Premium,MVM
join:2000-05-04
not in ohio
kudos:8
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
said by Mele20:

He said email accounts were an example of lowered tiered accounts.

No he did not.

said by Krisnatharok:

Many people have lower tiered accounts compromised--say an email address and password.

An 'email address' is not 'an account'. An email address is an email address. Many sites that provide accounts use an email address as an identifier for an account, but that does not make the email address equal the account, nor does it make the account equal the email address.

-----

By 'lower tiered' I assume he means an account you don't much care about: e.g., I have an account at crucial.com, identified (I think) by email address, because I needed to ask a support question one time. Or maybe he means an account at a site where they don't have industrial-strength security because they're not really dealing with high-value data (which is the same thing to me as an 'account I don't much care about'). Either way, I don't much worry about breaches there, but it would expose my email address, though not any password I cared about.


ArkhmAsylm
Evrythng I need isn't really what I want

join:2006-02-22
Saint Paul, MN
reply to chrisretusn
-
You just hit 'Continue' to bypass...
--
*Tap, Tap, Tap* Is this thing on?


caffeinator
Coming soon to a cup near you..
Premium
join:2005-01-16
WA, USA
kudos:4
said by ArkhmAsylm:

-
You just hit 'Continue' to bypass...

+1

Never have had a mobile, so nuts 2 them.

KoRnGtL15
Premium
join:2007-01-04
Grants Pass, OR
kudos:1
reply to ArkhmAsylm
Like I said before. I have done that before as well and it worked. Eventually you guys will get flagged over time and that screen will not let you pass. It will force you to provide a number and they will send you a code. You then need to put it in to "verify" the account. If you don't go through that and ignore it like me. The account will be eventually disabled. Hence the email I received asking for government id.

said by ArkhmAsylm:

-
You just hit 'Continue' to bypass...



Dude111
An Awesome Dude
Premium
join:2003-08-04
USA
kudos:13

 

In which case i hope you told them where to stick it! (YOUR LIFE IS YOURS,NOT ANYONES TO SNOOP ON @ WILL)


Razzy12345

@rr.com
reply to KoRnGtL15

Re: Facebook now wants your personal phone number....

So you broke the rules on Facebook. Congrats. They can do whatever they want. I still don't have phone numbers on my account, neither does my girlfriend. And I have 180ish (RL) friends and none of them are bitching about it at all.

Sorry.


Razzy12345

@rr.com
BTW, I took a look at the Govt ID link.

You can black out all other information but your name, DOB and picture. It's not a big deal at all. And I can see why FB is doing this.

As long I'm not doing something funny, I won't have to do things like that.. but if it EVER did, I will just give them my cell number and BE DONE WITH IT (!!!!!!!), just like I did with many local businesses around here and many store accounts online.. NO BIG DEAL AT ALL. Jeez.


ArkhmAsylm
Evrythng I need isn't really what I want

join:2006-02-22
Saint Paul, MN
reply to KoRnGtL15
-
If that time comes, I can certainly do without Facebook.
--
*Tap, Tap, Tap* Is this thing on?


gaforces
United We Stand, Divided We Fall

join:2002-04-07
Santa Cruz, CA
reply to Razzy12345
It is a big deal, I'm already upset that they are using my information to make money. So just give them more? Yah right

KMA and the door wont bother me on the way out.
--
Let them eat FIBER!


Razzy12345

@rr.com
said by »www.facebook.com/help/?page=226611954016283 :

What's Facebook's philosophy on personal information and ads?

Facebook strives to create relevant and interesting advertisements for you and your friends. Here are the facts about Facebook Ads:

•Facebook Ads are sometimes paired with news about social actions (e.g., liking a Page) that your friends have taken.

•You only appear in Facebook Ads to your confirmed friends. If a photo is used, it is your profile photo and not from your photo albums.

Facebook doesn't sell your information to advertisers.

•Facebook enforces policies that help protect your experience with Apps by outside developers and ad networks.

They won't share your phone number if you put it in.


gaforces
United We Stand, Divided We Fall

join:2002-04-07
Santa Cruz, CA

1 recommendation

said by Razzy12345 :

said by »www.facebook.com/help/?page=226611954016283 :

What's Facebook's philosophy on personal information and ads?

Facebook strives to create relevant and interesting advertisements for you and your friends. Here are the facts about Facebook Ads:

•Facebook Ads are sometimes paired with news about social actions (e.g., liking a Page) that your friends have taken.

•You only appear in Facebook Ads to your confirmed friends. If a photo is used, it is your profile photo and not from your photo albums.

Facebook doesn't sell your information to advertisers.

•Facebook enforces policies that help protect your experience with Apps by outside developers and ad networks.

They won't share your phone number if you put it in.

Gullibility is a failure of social intelligence in which a person is easily tricked or manipulated into an ill-advised course of action. It is closely related to credulity, which is the tendency to believe unlikely propositions that are unsupported by evidence.[1][2]

Classes of people especially vulnerable to exploitation due to gullibility include children, the elderly, and the developmentally disabled
»en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gullibility
--
Let them eat FIBER!
Expand your moderator at work


goalieskates
Premium
join:2004-09-12
land of big
reply to Razzy12345

Re: Facebook now wants your personal phone number....

said by Razzy12345 :

said by »www.facebook.com/help/?page=226611954016283 :

What's Facebook's philosophy on personal information and ads?

Facebook strives to create relevant and interesting advertisements for you and your friends. Here are the facts about Facebook Ads:

•Facebook Ads are sometimes paired with news about social actions (e.g., liking a Page) that your friends have taken.

•You only appear in Facebook Ads to your confirmed friends. If a photo is used, it is your profile photo and not from your photo albums.

Facebook doesn't sell your information to advertisers.

•Facebook enforces policies that help protect your experience with Apps by outside developers and ad networks.

They won't share your phone number if you put it in.

No, they say they won't sell it. That doesn't mean they won't share it with their partners. And they do.

Mele20
Premium
join:2001-06-05
Hilo, HI
kudos:5
reply to Razzy12345
But they will share your photo in an AD?! OMG. How can anyone intelligent about computers and posting in this forum try to justify Facebook?

If they are demanding a real phone number, they must also insist on your real picture for your profile photo. How insanely naive can all those users be?! NEVER EVER put a photo of yourself on the net.

What if you put a skunk photo as your profile photo? What if you put a photo of some stranger and claim it is you?

You know it is so sad. I was talking with a Hawaii State Public Library worker the other day. She is a young woman in her early 20's and we were discussing the problems with the library's website. That led to talking about Facebook, internet privacy, etc. and she told me that some of her friends here who are young professional women are in a quandary and greatly regret that, while teenagers, they posted impulsively on Facebook and with little, if any thought, to how what they were saying then might embarrass them, cause them to not be hired for the job they really wanted, etc. when they became older. She said "We were so immature and we just didn't get it, some didn't get it more than others, and now we have to deal with those remarks that embarrass us, cause problems for us as we try to get ahead in our careers, and we have to do this for the rest of our lives". She said that she and her friends were seriously considering leaving Facebook and were trying to get through to their younger siblings to not make the same mistakes regarding privacy and Facebook.
--
When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. Thomas Jefferson


ashrc4
Premium
join:2009-02-06
australia

1 recommendation

said by Mele20:

You know it is so sad. I was talking with a Hawaii State Public Library worker the other day. She is a young woman in her early 20's and we were discussing the problems with the library's website. That led to talking about Facebook, internet privacy, etc. and she told me that some of her friends here who are young professional women are in a quandary and greatly regret that, while teenagers, they posted impulsively on Facebook and with little, if any thought, to how what they were saying then might embarrass them, cause them to not be hired for the job they really wanted, etc. when they became older. She said "We were so immature and we just didn't get it, some didn't get it more than others, and now we have to deal with those remarks that embarrass us, cause problems for us as we try to get ahead in our careers, and we have to do this for the rest of our lives". She said that she and her friends were seriously considering leaving Facebook and were trying to get through to their younger siblings to not make the same mistakes regarding privacy and Facebook.

"Nearly seven out of 10 Facebook members surveyed — and 52% of Google users — say they are either "somewhat" or "very concerned" about their privacy while using the world's most popular social network and dominant search engine.

Even so, technologists and privacy experts say most people lack a clear grasp of the complex risks they accept whenever they're on the Internet. "Consumers generally do not understand who's getting access to their data and for what purpose," says Ryan Calo, director of the Consumer Privacy Project at the Stanford University Center for Internet and Society."

»www.usatoday.com/tech/news/2011-···ST_N.htm sourced from »mashable.com/2011/11/17/facebook···secrets/ sighted from »www.theage.com.au/technology/tec···lv0.html

Mele20 thanks for your example.....really is just the tip of the iceberg.
--
Paradigm Shift beta test pilot. "Now is the not right time to stop folding."
Expand your moderator at work

17775992

join:2011-11-16
Chicago, IL
reply to Mele20

Re: Facebook now wants your personal phone number....

said by Mele20:

But they will share your photo in an AD?! OMG. How can anyone intelligent about computers and posting in this forum try to justify Facebook?

I have a clear and straightforward question for you ...

Do you consider DSLReports safe and secure? More than Facebook?
More than any social website anywhere?


Dude111
An Awesome Dude
Premium
join:2003-08-04
USA
kudos:13

1 recommendation

 

quote:
Do you consider DSLReports safe and secure? More than Facebook?
More than any social website anywhere?
Yes i do

1) THEY DONT ASK FOR PERSONAL INFO
2) THEY DONT FORCE YOUR REAL NAME
3) THEY DONT WANT YOUR PHOTO

Thats just 3 right there!

Mele20
Premium
join:2001-06-05
Hilo, HI
kudos:5
I missed that post by 17775992 See Profile until just now. Sorry.

Like dude1111 See Profile I too consider DSLReports safe and secure as far as selling user information, etc.

I haven't been asked for a photo of myself. I haven't had to provide my real name here nor have I ever been asked for a cell phone number or my home address, etc. My antivirus forum demands my full real name and address starting about a year ago and that is not even a "social" website (nor is this site in the strictest sense but in some ways it is a social website).

DSLR stands almost alone on the net of large, popular websites that allow anon posting. If Justin wanted to secretly sell our information (if it were asked for) I don't think his site would allow anon posters. That stance has been in place since the beginning of this site and is a good indicator of the stance of the site and its owner regarding the mining of personal information.

I do wish one little thing though. When is Justin going to fix the password problem?
--
When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. Thomas Jefferson

17775992

join:2011-11-16
Chicago, IL
I guess you have not paid attention to the Google and Google-analytic scripts that collect information(you have no-script blocking them right?).

Facebook has NEVER asked for any of my personal information or for me to prove I am who I say I am, never required to post a real picture of me or my real location.

There is NO SUCH THING of truly anon posting on Internet anywhere.

17775992

join:2011-11-16
Chicago, IL

1 recommendation

reply to Dude111
said by Dude111:

Do you consider DSLReports safe and secure? More than Facebook?
More than any social website anywhere?
Yes I do

1) THEY DON'T ASK FOR PERSONAL INFO
2) THEY DON'T FORCE YOUR REAL NAME
3) THEY DON'T WANT YOUR PHOTO

Thats just 3 right there!

Neither does Facebook ....
Real Name, kinda defeats the purpose of joining Facebook not joining with your real name or what most people know you as.
NO WHERE do they require you to post any personal information but again kinda defeats the purpose of joining Facebook not giving your real location.
Loads of non-paranoid people have posted their pictures here, again not required on Facebook.
The OPTION of listing your phone number on Facebook is if you don't mind your "friends" knowing your number, or in a separate area if you have problems logging on or if there are issues with your account, there is NO requirement to do so in either case.

Life is so much more relaxing not being paranoid.