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KCrimson
Premium
join:2001-02-25
Brooklyn, NY
kudos:1
reply to guppy_fish

Re: [HD] FCC Rules on Verizon Access to MSG HD

Perhaps - all I've tested side-by-side was my 32" Samsung 720p LCD vs its 32" Samsung 1080p cousin - they were playing a Blu-Ray demo video and I angled the two to provide equidistant equivalent viewing angles - the 1080p was just nearly negligibly clearer (perhaps it was the blacks). As for what you're describing with fast action video - is that the stuttering I see sometimes while watching hockey games on my 7216? The reason I ask is because the effect was just as bad using my analog SDTV's, on MSG (i.e. non-HD - the box wasn't translating an HD signal to SD).



bohratom
Jersey Shore is back again.

join:2011-07-07
Red Bank NJ
reply to guppy_fish

said by guppy_fish:

Plasma is king with true blacks

Along with good RPTV's from Mitsubishi and Hitachi.....of course that was afew years ago....


joe01880

join:2007-10-26
Wakefield, MA
reply to guppy_fish

said by guppy_fish:

LCD's are cheap for a reason, the refresh rate and typically cheap processors don't deal well with fast action Video. If your happy that is all that matters

Plasma is king with true blacks and 600hz refresh, the 240hz LCD's are next down to the Walmart price busters.

Only parially true and subject to opinion..you get what you pay for and the same is true with LCD's...and Plasmas!
My Sony NX has awesome blacks and hockey looks great with its 240hz refesh rate. If the puck blurs im not noticing it.

and have you priced Plasmas recently..way cheap, but again, you get what you pay for!


adkinsjm

join:2004-10-13
Cuyahoga Falls, OH

TV is only 30 frames per second. Anything higher than that uses motion interpolation to create intermediate frames. That's why some TV shows look "fake" when you turn motion processing on with some TVs.


nysports4evr
Premium
join:2010-01-23
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast

said by adkinsjm:

TV is only 30 frames per second. Anything higher than that uses motion interpolation to create intermediate frames. That's why some TV shows look "fake" when you turn motion processing on with some TVs.

False. Some channels broadcast true 720p60, including all Disney owned channels (ABC, ESPN) and Fox owned channels (Fox, FX, etc).


icemannyr1

join:2001-04-11
Township Of Washington, NJ

My 120hz TV has a Motion Blur processing setting.
I'll check if turning it on helps improve the MSG HD PQ.



klitch

@verizon.net
reply to nysports4evr

said by nysports4evr:

said by adkinsjm:

TV is only 30 frames per second. Anything higher than that uses motion interpolation to create intermediate frames. That's why some TV shows look "fake" when you turn motion processing on with some TVs.

False. Some channels broadcast true 720p60, including all Disney owned channels (ABC, ESPN) and Fox owned channels (Fox, FX, etc).

your both false, ALL television is broadcast at 60 frames per second in the US, in the UK it is 50 frames per second. Movies are shown at 24 frames per second. the refresh rate that you watch something at should never go above 60p, while some TV's have the capacity to go above that it becomes over kill and your picture can blur during action shots if you have your refresh rate too high. So having a 240hz TV sounds like it would be better but in actuality its just overkill.

tnsprin

join:2003-07-23
Bradenton, FL
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS

1080i and 480i US stations are broadcasting 60 Fields per second (actually 59.94 ) but it takes 2 interlaced fields to make a Frame. 720P stations are broadcasting 60 frames a second.

Of course in many cases the source material is actually 24 Frame per second film/video.


UnnDunn
Premium
join:2005-12-21
Brooklyn, NY
reply to brownk

OK, I was avoiding this discussion, but now I see that I must interject.

Class is in session. Pay attention if you wish.

There are three terms I'm seeing people freely mix and match, failing to understand what they mean. They are the subfield rate of the set, the refresh rate of the display and the framerate of the incoming signal. These three things are separate and distinct and should never be confused:

•The subfield rate applies to Plasma TVs only and is measured in Hz. It denotes the rate at which the screen sends a charge to all the pixels making them flash. This strobelike flashing occurs whenever the screen is powered on, and it happens so fast that it appears as if the screen is emitting a steady, constant light.

All new Plasma TVs have a subfield rate of 600Hz. Older Plasma TVs had a subfield rate of 480Hz. No other TV type has a subfield rate figure, simply because they do not emit light by flashing pixels in a strobelike way.

•The refresh rate applies to all TV types and is measured in Hz. This term denotes the rate at which pixels are changed by the onboard computer according to the incoming video signal (unlike the subfield rate, which is independent of the incoming video signal.)

Plasma TVs have refresh rates ranging from 48Hz to 96Hz, usually matching or doubling the incoming signal's framerate. LCD TVs have refresh rates ranging from 48Hz to 60Hz, however they also employ video processing routines that occur 120 or 240 times a second, analysing upcoming video frames to try to make the most out of each refresh cycle.

•The framerate of the incoming content is the rate at which new frames of video are transmitted, measured in frames per second (fps).

It's important to distinguish between the framerate of the content and the framerate of the transmission medium; they are two different things. For example, a movie is 24fps. But if you watch it on Blu-ray, most players will send a 30fps signal to the TV (unless you set it to send 24fps.) The same 24fps movie shown on HBO will be broadcast at 30fps, whereas if it's shown on Disney HD, it'll be 60fps until it hits your set-top-box, where it may be converted to a 30fps signal before hitting your TV.

Common content framerates include 24fps for movies, 30fps for NTSC TV and 25fps for PAL TV. However, NTSC and PAL are shot with interlaced scanning, with each frame split into two fields which are transmitted separately. So NTSC is actually 60 fields per second and PAL TV is 50 fields per second.

Common transmission framerates include 24fps, 30fps, 30fps interlaced and 60fps. All ATSC resolutions support all framerates with the exception of 1920x1080, which omits 60fps.

Are we clear now? Good. From now on, there is to be no confusion as to framerate, refresh rate and subfield rate.

Class dismissed.

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