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sempergoofy
Premium
join:2001-07-06
Smyrna, GA
Reviews:
·AT&T Southeast

11 recommendations

Pics of our major kitchen/den remodel

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The den prior to renovation
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Turn around and take pic of kitchen from same location
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A view from the den the night before destruction
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First problem - leveling subfloor in den for hardwood
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Drywall going up. Note they went over the old t-in-g ceiling
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Jumping ahead, we picked out our granite slab at the factory
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Started the paint selection process at the granite factory
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Bought paint samples and made my selection board
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Walls got painted so cabinets could go in
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Down the hallway, unlevel conditions required big work to correct
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Hardwood flooring is installed in the den
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Granite cutting template is made and taken back to factory
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Major cuts made at factory, but stove cut out made onsite, leaving me with 30x24 chunk
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Under sink - my RedyTemp and Waterbug water detection
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Skip to finished den
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Decorative arc in countertop on den side
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From den toward kitchen. Note new 6-panel door to downstair garage
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Another view toward kitchen
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Cool blue control lights on both sides of vent
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Pantry cabinet where refrigerator was in old kitchen
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Wide angle view 1
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Wide angle view 2
The wife and I recently finished a three month long kitchen/den remodel. I actually hired contractor for this one because it was just too much for me to consider doing myself. So since we all like to show off our do it yourself projects, this one is not one of those. The project involved the den, the adjacent kitchen, and laying down 600 square feet of tongue in groove 3/4 inch red oak hardwood flooring in the den, kitchen, and continuing down all of the hallways. The original projection was for 8 weeks. Took 13 weeks total. New cabinets were the largest single expense. New appliances together rivaled that.

The kitchen/den are in a part of the house that was an addition in the early 1970s. So they had need been renovated in a major fashion since then. The pine paneling was here when we bought the house in 1983.

For those who like to know the answer to the, "Did you pull a permit?" question, the answer is YES, the contractor pulled permits. And the county sent inspectors for framing (though we were not changing any), electrical, and final.

We had budgeted $X, and with unexpected repairs for floor leveling, blown in insulation, and other change orders, we went over $X by $10K. The good news is, we had anticipated that and budgeted the original $X accordingly.

I was thoroughly impressed with the carpentry skills of the lead-man. Over 30 years in the house construction and renovation field. At other times, I was frustrated when he would not slow down and take a moment to think about what he was about to do in a sticky "old-house" situation. I work in a home office and we both suffered every day because of that. My presence made for faster answers to show stopper questions that would come up.

Some related threads where various topics that influenced the outcome were discussed:
»Any Redytemp hot water recirculator pump experiences?
»Plumbing leak detection and shutoff devices
»Ideas for a 30x24 inch hunk of granite?
»NEC outlet requirement on peninsulas

Next up on the remodel agenda, the dining room. When we did the kitchen, the doorway to the dining room was moved over about three inches (because it was never lined up correctly with the wall to the right of the new pantry cabinet) and it was widened a little. So the drywall on the opposite side of the doorway in the kitchen needs a bit of work, plus the wife wants to take down the wainscot and wallpaper. So it will either bit a small bit of drywall work, or major drywall work. To be determined. But I intend to that work myself since I am now poor from paying the contractor.
--
nohup rm -fr /&


Pacrat
Old and Cranky
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-10
Cortland, OH
kudos:2

1 recommendation

Wow! That really opened up the space... a lot. It's beautiful!



dandelion
Premium,MVM
join:2003-04-29
Germantown, TN
kudos:5

1 recommendation

reply to sempergoofy

Really nice now and a big difference, thanks for lots of pictures!



The Pig
I know you want to be me
Premium
join:2009-09-11
reply to sempergoofy

First couple of pictures scared me with all that paneling!
Came out great!
Only thing I would have done differently is get rid of the kitchen L cutting off the living room and kitchen, then put the stove under the microwave!



Again it is very nice!


PSWired

join:2006-03-26
Annapolis, MD

1 recommendation

reply to sempergoofy

Amazing transformation. Nice work.

Have you considered painting the brick fireplace?



sempergoofy
Premium
join:2001-07-06
Smyrna, GA
Reviews:
·AT&T Southeast

said by PSWired:

Have you considered painting the brick fireplace?

We are thinking that we want to go over the brick with large floor light-colored tiles. Several inspirations on this site: »www.homebedazzle.com/diy_firepla···dels.htm (Be sure to look at "page 2" too.) Also are considering use the 30x24 chunk of granite (cut/polished/seamed) for a new mantle as discussed in this other thread mentioned above: »Ideas for a 30x24 inch hunk of granite?

The mantle in the picture is the old mantle that was there prior to renovation.
--
nohup rm -fr /&


VegasMan
Are We There Yet?
Premium
join:2002-11-17
Schaumburg, IL

1 recommendation

reply to sempergoofy

Nice transformation form 1970 to 2011. Also probably added 30k to the value of your house.
That small kitchen and all the wood panel would scare off a lot of buyers.
--
In need of a Vegas vacation.



sempergoofy
Premium
join:2001-07-06
Smyrna, GA
Reviews:
·AT&T Southeast
reply to sempergoofy

A few items of potential interest that I forgot to mention.

1) We switched from electric stove to gas. (Yay! I've wanted that for years!) There was a thread here recently about bad vs. good flexible gas piping. As a result, I assured the new-good was used.

2) The appliance brands are Samsung refrigerator, Bosch dishwasher, Whirlpool stove/oven (with convection cooking capability) and Panasonic microwave. The big items were bought primarily for their good reviews with the fridge overriding good reviews slightly for features (counter depth and other "this is neat!" items). The microwave was selected more for its size than anything else (yes, we could go a bit bigger).

3) The paint color is "Rice paddy" by Sherwin Williams. (Duron owns Sherwin Williams now for those who saw the Duron paint sampler.) I went to Home Depot and had them mix the S.W. samples in their Behr pint samples (computers are great!) because the samples are $3 apiece. So for $36 I got 12 different color samples for the sample board.

4) I have ordered a stainless steel trim kit for around the microwave from microtrim.com.

5) Four weeks after the ceiling was complete the contractor discovered cracks in some of the seams. After analysis and discussion with other drywall pros, the consensus was that the tongue-in-groove ceiling was probably moving a bit due to heat expansion. There was (always had been) too little insulation above in the attic. To address, I agreed to have insulation blown in (a winner any way I looked at it), and he agreed to go back and put screws every six inches through every board into ceiling joists. That is a LOT of screws. I was aggravated that we were opening up the drywall dust and painting world again, but it had to be done.

6) In the picture of the RedyTemp recirculator pump and Waterbug, you may see the X10 transceiver and X10 relay closer wall-warts. I have a wireless motion detector in the sponge drawer under the sink, and another in the bathroom. When either are activated, they signal the transceiver wirelessly that in turn signals the relay closer that momentarily closes a relay that signals the RedyTemp that hot water is desired. That kicks on the pump if the temperature sensor says it is necessary at the pump. The bathroom gets the benefit because it tees off of the line that goes to the kitchen as it passes beneath the bathroom.
--
nohup rm -fr /&



sempergoofy
Premium
join:2001-07-06
Smyrna, GA
Reviews:
·AT&T Southeast
reply to VegasMan

said by VegasMan:

Nice transformation form 1970 to 2011. Also probably added 30k to the value of your house.
That small kitchen and all the wood panel would scare off a lot of buyers.

I sure hope so! At least we made it look/feel like we wanted. And you are so right about the pine paneling. While it attracted us in 1984 as first time buyers, we were sick of it. (And frankly, still are because guess what? Our master bedroom on the other side of the house used to be the kitchen and the walls and ceiling are the same paneling that was removed/covered in the pictured part of the house. It, too, must go one day as soon as feasible.
--
nohup rm -fr /&


SandShark
Long may you run
Premium,MVM
join:2000-05-23
Santa Fe, TX
kudos:3

1 recommendation

reply to sempergoofy

Awesome transformation! Thanks for sharing.



Ken
Premium,MVM
join:2003-06-16
Markle, IN

1 recommendation

reply to sempergoofy

First off, looks great. Much better than the old dated room. I am wondering however why you didn't move the ceiling fan into the middle of the room, and just have a ceiling fan with light kit as opposed to a light and then several feet away a fan. Picture 15 just looks awkward to me with the placement of the ceiling fan.


seederjed
Premium
join:2005-02-28
Norcross, GA

1 recommendation

reply to sempergoofy

Where did you get the Granite?
looks like A&A Marble and Granite in Norcross.

That looks like a great project.
What caused the sag and unevenness in the floors and how did they fix it?



nunya
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:12

1 recommendation

reply to sempergoofy

It looks great. That's quite a transformation.



cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7

2 recommendations

reply to sempergoofy

Why did you ruin that end cabinet and put an outlet on it.

Looks great.



jack b
Gone Fishing
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-08
Cape Cod
kudos:1
reply to sempergoofy

Very nice job!
I had a double sink just like that and for the most part hated it. Large (baking) pans would not lay flat in order to soak, and were a pain to wash.
I just replaced it with a single tub design.
--
~Help Find a Cure for Cancer~
~Proud Member of Team Discovery ~



alphapointe
Don't Touch Me
Premium,MVM
join:2002-02-10
Columbia, MO
kudos:2

1 recommendation

reply to sempergoofy

That is totally iced!



joako
Premium
join:2000-09-07
/dev/null
kudos:6

1 recommendation

reply to sempergoofy

said by sempergoofy:

said by VegasMan:

Nice transformation form 1970 to 2011. Also probably added 30k to the value of your house.
That small kitchen and all the wood panel would scare off a lot of buyers.

I sure hope so! At least we made it look/feel like we wanted. And you are so right about the pine paneling. While it attracted us in 1984 as first time buyers, we were sick of it. (And frankly, still are because guess what? Our master bedroom on the other side of the house used to be the kitchen and the walls and ceiling are the same paneling that was removed/covered in the pictured part of the house. It, too, must go one day as soon as feasible.

Have you thought of paiting it? I painted my paneling white before I felt comfortable putting in the money for remodeling.

Also curious as to what you are using the X10 module for. I wouldn't rely on X10 for anything...
--
PRescott7-2097


cableties
Premium
join:2005-01-27

1 recommendation

reply to sempergoofy

This was like watching this old house, only less "bawstun" accent!

Nice reno! Many don't know the headaches and decisions...

Good luck!
--
Splat



Spork35

join:2011-07-13
Methuen, MA

1 recommendation

reply to sempergoofy

Did they happen to secure the dishwasher to the granite? There is 2 brackets to do so on the dishwasher typically and they failed to do that on ours. I ended up buying some brackets and doing it myself.

»www.granitegrabbers.com/



sempergoofy
Premium
join:2001-07-06
Smyrna, GA
Reviews:
·AT&T Southeast
reply to Ken

Click for full size
Picture with the furniture returned from storage
said by Ken:

First off, looks great. Much better than the old dated room. I am wondering however why you didn't move the ceiling fan into the middle of the room, and just have a ceiling fan with light kit as opposed to a light and then several feet away a fan. Picture 15 just looks awkward to me with the placement of the ceiling fan.

With so many years of experience with this den, we knew how the furniture would be re(placed) and like the fan over us while sitting on the couch. (The fireplace is a real pain when it comes to furniture placement.) We did consider placing the fan in the center with a light fixture, but concluded as we did. Sorry I do not currently have a better lit photo, and the room is not finished being decorated yet, but this should give you a better idea. The flat screen TV and stereo equipment are in the armoire. And the paint color really goes well with the dark brown leather.
--
nohup rm -fr /&


sempergoofy
Premium
join:2001-07-06
Smyrna, GA
Reviews:
·AT&T Southeast
reply to seederjed

said by seederjed:

Where did you get the Granite?
looks like A&A Marble and Granite in Norcross.

That looks like a great project.
What caused the sag and unevenness in the floors and how did they fix it?

We used Top South in Marietta in part due to geography. The contractor had associations with them as well as with one or two companies over on the northeast side of Atlanta. Top South has a factory show room, then you go downstairs to the factory area and walk through rows of huge slabs of granite to pick out your specific slab from the many different types and colors. The choice is specific since it is natural stone and each is unique. Some people like veining, others do not.

After we narrowed it down to different stone styles, they used a big ceiling tracked industrial crane to move one of the slabs so that my wife could see them side by side to make her final decision on which one. (No charge for that, though some companies do charge I understand.) We were able to peek into the other areas where cutting and polishing were being done to the huge pieces.
--
nohup rm -fr /&


whizkid3
Premium,MVM
join:2002-02-21
Queens, NY
kudos:9

1 recommendation

reply to sempergoofy

Looks awesome in almost every way. Yeah, it was a tough road getting there (as you know), but the end shows it was worth it.

The only thing I am not a fan of at all, is how they did the fireplace (or it was left that way and untouched). The wooden mantle and brass doors, on the brick, looks very kludgy and dated. The design of the space and kitchen - as well as the small part of the long wall it is one - would have lent itself to some more modern techniques. Can't really say; I am not a designer; but IMHO, it doesn't look good.



sempergoofy
Premium
join:2001-07-06
Smyrna, GA
Reviews:
·AT&T Southeast

1 edit
reply to seederjed

said by seederjed:

What caused the sag and unevenness in the floors and how did they fix it?

The unevenness was caused by settling mostly. The oldest part of the house is (apparently) from 1954. There have been two additions.

The fix in the den area was to add luan board in the depressed areas to level it out and then new 3/4" tongue in grove OSB over the subfloor to make the new surface. The OSB replaced 1970s particle board which would not have held the staples for the tongue-in-groove 3/4" red oad hardwood.

In the hallway, the contractor had to remove subflooring down to the joists. Using his laser level as a guide, he found that a few of them were a tad high due to crowning. He used a planer to shave them until all was level. He was also unhappy with some of the no-longer-used construction techniques for support. He beefed up the support and also added two concrete "elephant feet" with pressure treated 4x4 supports in the two places he was not happy about. The hallway is really solid now.

Edit: fix typo to spell tongue-in-groove correctly.
--
nohup rm -fr /&


sempergoofy
Premium
join:2001-07-06
Smyrna, GA
Reviews:
·AT&T Southeast
reply to jack b

said by jack b:

Very nice job!
I had a double sink just like that and for the most part hated it. Large (baking) pans would not lay flat in order to soak, and were a pain to wash.
I just replaced it with a single tub design.

We looked at those single tubs (troughs?) in the factory showroom and considered getting one. In the end, we opted for the double bowl. I can't remember the metal guage, but it is a step up from what you might pick up in the big box store.
--
nohup rm -fr /&


sempergoofy
Premium
join:2001-07-06
Smyrna, GA
Reviews:
·AT&T Southeast
reply to joako

said by joako:

Have you thought of paiting it? I painted my paneling white before I felt comfortable putting in the money for remodeling.

Also curious as to what you are using the X10 module for. I wouldn't rely on X10 for anything...

Yes, for the bedroom paneling painting has been considered. But we know already that the electrical wiring needs to be replaced (no grounded outlets as it is the oldest part of the house), and insufficient insulation is in the walls due to the age. So yanking it out makes more sense for access to correct insulation and electrical.

For the X10 use, see number 6 in my itemized post above.
--
nohup rm -fr /&


cypherstream
Premium,MVM
join:2004-12-02
Reading, PA
kudos:3

1 recommendation

reply to sempergoofy

Wow really nice job! Huge transformation and I know it feels good to have that project done and out of the way!

I have paneling in my lower level den, though the ceiling is drywall. I might remove it and put drywall up with a friend. Who knows what I will uncover too.. like maybe I will have to beef up the insulation... or maybe I'll find out there's no moisture barrier (its a lower level concrete wall).

Thats the thing with these projects. You can only really rough estimate the time and money. I think for everything you got out of this job it was worth it.

Maybe some day down the road I would look at new fireplace fronts and replace the brass. However with all you sunk into it now, feel free to take a little break. I'm sure your wallet and patience needs it.



sempergoofy
Premium
join:2001-07-06
Smyrna, GA
Reviews:
·AT&T Southeast
reply to whizkid3

said by whizkid3:

The only thing I am not a fan of at all, is how they did the fireplace (or it was left that way and untouched). The wooden mantle and brass doors, on the brick, looks very kludgy and dated. The design of the space and kitchen - as well as the small part of the long wall it is one - would have lent itself to some more modern techniques. Can't really say; I am not a designer; but IMHO, it doesn't look good.

With the check book smoking from the friction of money flowing out of it, we had to draw the line somewhere. So I did not let them do anything to the fireplace except run drywall up to it in j-channel. I agree the former brass fireplace door is out of place with all of the stainless steel and brushed satin nickle we went with for the doorknobs, fan, appliances, and den light fixture. Once the checkbook recovers a bit, we will redo the fireplace as previously described. Also, now that the natural gas is so close due to the stove, I am thinking maybe gas logs. We have not built a fire in years.
--
nohup rm -fr /&


sempergoofy
Premium
join:2001-07-06
Smyrna, GA
Reviews:
·AT&T Southeast
reply to sempergoofy

Click for full size
Atlanta Hardwoods 1
Click for full size
Atlanta Hardwoods 2
Click for full size
Atlanta Hardwoods 3
Click for full size
The custom transition from the den to hallway
A few other anecdotes.

Gawd is it a pain in the butt to have a temporary kitchen. Our dining room became the temp kitchen. We bought an induction cooking plate so we could heat/boil things (safer than open heating coil).

I installed a utility/laundry tub down in the basement/garage next to the clothes washer the weekend before the demolition started. So glad I did. While it was a pain in the butt to carry a cleaning bucket of dirty dishes downstairs to wash, at least the sink was big enough to handle it. I can't image using a bathroom sink to wash dirty dishes in. The food particles would be to much of a yuck mess.

The old refrigerator (10 years old this month) was given to my brother-in-law. The other appliances went into the dumpster where they belonged!

You can't trust Minwax color charts for their stains. I had to get stain for the hardwood transitions between rooms. Good thing we tested first.

I found a great nearby place to buy exotic and fine hardwoods. The drop off from the den to the hallway is pretty high and no stock transition was going to work. I needed a four foot wide piece and very thick piece of red oak for a custom transition that the contractor carved for me. It needed to be 8/4 thickness in lumber yard terms. After checking around with some lumber yards, some said they could order what I needed but it would take a while to get in. The last one recommended I call Atlanta Hardwood. Holy cow, this place is a huge warehouse full of every kind of exotic wood you could want in random widths and industry thicknesses. Only a few miles from my house, I was floored at the selection. I found a perfect piece for my needs. 8/4 thickness, 7.5 inches wide. The board was 10 feet long. I took it up to the counter. The salesman asked how much I needed. I told him I only needed 4 feet. He said they will cut any board and sell what I needed as long as they are left with at least 6 feet. Bingo! 10-4=6. Then he pointed to a sign behind him. Forty-percent off 8/4 thickness boards during August. I walked out with the perfect 7.5" wide by 8/4 thick by 4 feet long red oak board for $20. If you are a wood working enthusiast in the Atlanta area, you need to visit this store. I've not seen anything like this place. Like a big box store with nothing but fine woods and veneers.
--
nohup rm -fr /&


sempergoofy
Premium
join:2001-07-06
Smyrna, GA
Reviews:
·AT&T Southeast
reply to Spork35

said by Spork35:

Did they happen to secure the dishwasher to the granite? There is 2 brackets to do so on the dishwasher typically and they failed to do that on ours. I ended up buying some brackets and doing it myself.

»www.granitegrabbers.com/

Yes. The granite installers discussed our plans with us, and we already had the dishwasher on site in the garage awaiting install. Some measurements were done, and with help from the contractor, a piece of the cabinet trim molding was secured at the correct position to the granite. When the dishwasher was finally installed screws were driven through the dishwasher's factory brackets into that piece of molding. So far, so good.

I noted on the Bosch dishwasher they also had in the install instructions that you could remove the brackets from on top and relocate them to the side to secure to the cabinet if desired.
--
nohup rm -fr /&

ctggzg
Premium
join:2005-02-11
USA
kudos:2
reply to sempergoofy

Looks nice, but sorry, what was wrong with the old stuff? How much time, energy, money, and material was trashed while redoing it?