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sempergoofy
Premium
join:2001-07-06
Smyrna, GA
Reviews:
·AT&T Southeast
reply to seederjed

Re: Pics of our major kitchen/den remodel

said by seederjed:

Where did you get the Granite?
looks like A&A Marble and Granite in Norcross.

That looks like a great project.
What caused the sag and unevenness in the floors and how did they fix it?

We used Top South in Marietta in part due to geography. The contractor had associations with them as well as with one or two companies over on the northeast side of Atlanta. Top South has a factory show room, then you go downstairs to the factory area and walk through rows of huge slabs of granite to pick out your specific slab from the many different types and colors. The choice is specific since it is natural stone and each is unique. Some people like veining, others do not.

After we narrowed it down to different stone styles, they used a big ceiling tracked industrial crane to move one of the slabs so that my wife could see them side by side to make her final decision on which one. (No charge for that, though some companies do charge I understand.) We were able to peek into the other areas where cutting and polishing were being done to the huge pieces.
--
nohup rm -fr /&


whizkid3
Premium,MVM
join:2002-02-21
Queens, NY
kudos:9

1 recommendation

reply to sempergoofy

Looks awesome in almost every way. Yeah, it was a tough road getting there (as you know), but the end shows it was worth it.

The only thing I am not a fan of at all, is how they did the fireplace (or it was left that way and untouched). The wooden mantle and brass doors, on the brick, looks very kludgy and dated. The design of the space and kitchen - as well as the small part of the long wall it is one - would have lent itself to some more modern techniques. Can't really say; I am not a designer; but IMHO, it doesn't look good.



sempergoofy
Premium
join:2001-07-06
Smyrna, GA
Reviews:
·AT&T Southeast

1 edit
reply to seederjed

said by seederjed:

What caused the sag and unevenness in the floors and how did they fix it?

The unevenness was caused by settling mostly. The oldest part of the house is (apparently) from 1954. There have been two additions.

The fix in the den area was to add luan board in the depressed areas to level it out and then new 3/4" tongue in grove OSB over the subfloor to make the new surface. The OSB replaced 1970s particle board which would not have held the staples for the tongue-in-groove 3/4" red oad hardwood.

In the hallway, the contractor had to remove subflooring down to the joists. Using his laser level as a guide, he found that a few of them were a tad high due to crowning. He used a planer to shave them until all was level. He was also unhappy with some of the no-longer-used construction techniques for support. He beefed up the support and also added two concrete "elephant feet" with pressure treated 4x4 supports in the two places he was not happy about. The hallway is really solid now.

Edit: fix typo to spell tongue-in-groove correctly.
--
nohup rm -fr /&


sempergoofy
Premium
join:2001-07-06
Smyrna, GA
Reviews:
·AT&T Southeast
reply to jack b

said by jack b:

Very nice job!
I had a double sink just like that and for the most part hated it. Large (baking) pans would not lay flat in order to soak, and were a pain to wash.
I just replaced it with a single tub design.

We looked at those single tubs (troughs?) in the factory showroom and considered getting one. In the end, we opted for the double bowl. I can't remember the metal guage, but it is a step up from what you might pick up in the big box store.
--
nohup rm -fr /&


sempergoofy
Premium
join:2001-07-06
Smyrna, GA
Reviews:
·AT&T Southeast
reply to joako

said by joako:

Have you thought of paiting it? I painted my paneling white before I felt comfortable putting in the money for remodeling.

Also curious as to what you are using the X10 module for. I wouldn't rely on X10 for anything...

Yes, for the bedroom paneling painting has been considered. But we know already that the electrical wiring needs to be replaced (no grounded outlets as it is the oldest part of the house), and insufficient insulation is in the walls due to the age. So yanking it out makes more sense for access to correct insulation and electrical.

For the X10 use, see number 6 in my itemized post above.
--
nohup rm -fr /&


cypherstream
Premium,MVM
join:2004-12-02
Reading, PA
kudos:3

1 recommendation

reply to sempergoofy

Wow really nice job! Huge transformation and I know it feels good to have that project done and out of the way!

I have paneling in my lower level den, though the ceiling is drywall. I might remove it and put drywall up with a friend. Who knows what I will uncover too.. like maybe I will have to beef up the insulation... or maybe I'll find out there's no moisture barrier (its a lower level concrete wall).

Thats the thing with these projects. You can only really rough estimate the time and money. I think for everything you got out of this job it was worth it.

Maybe some day down the road I would look at new fireplace fronts and replace the brass. However with all you sunk into it now, feel free to take a little break. I'm sure your wallet and patience needs it.



sempergoofy
Premium
join:2001-07-06
Smyrna, GA
Reviews:
·AT&T Southeast
reply to whizkid3

said by whizkid3:

The only thing I am not a fan of at all, is how they did the fireplace (or it was left that way and untouched). The wooden mantle and brass doors, on the brick, looks very kludgy and dated. The design of the space and kitchen - as well as the small part of the long wall it is one - would have lent itself to some more modern techniques. Can't really say; I am not a designer; but IMHO, it doesn't look good.

With the check book smoking from the friction of money flowing out of it, we had to draw the line somewhere. So I did not let them do anything to the fireplace except run drywall up to it in j-channel. I agree the former brass fireplace door is out of place with all of the stainless steel and brushed satin nickle we went with for the doorknobs, fan, appliances, and den light fixture. Once the checkbook recovers a bit, we will redo the fireplace as previously described. Also, now that the natural gas is so close due to the stove, I am thinking maybe gas logs. We have not built a fire in years.
--
nohup rm -fr /&


sempergoofy
Premium
join:2001-07-06
Smyrna, GA
Reviews:
·AT&T Southeast
reply to sempergoofy

Click for full size
Atlanta Hardwoods 1
Click for full size
Atlanta Hardwoods 2
Click for full size
Atlanta Hardwoods 3
Click for full size
The custom transition from the den to hallway
A few other anecdotes.

Gawd is it a pain in the butt to have a temporary kitchen. Our dining room became the temp kitchen. We bought an induction cooking plate so we could heat/boil things (safer than open heating coil).

I installed a utility/laundry tub down in the basement/garage next to the clothes washer the weekend before the demolition started. So glad I did. While it was a pain in the butt to carry a cleaning bucket of dirty dishes downstairs to wash, at least the sink was big enough to handle it. I can't image using a bathroom sink to wash dirty dishes in. The food particles would be to much of a yuck mess.

The old refrigerator (10 years old this month) was given to my brother-in-law. The other appliances went into the dumpster where they belonged!

You can't trust Minwax color charts for their stains. I had to get stain for the hardwood transitions between rooms. Good thing we tested first.

I found a great nearby place to buy exotic and fine hardwoods. The drop off from the den to the hallway is pretty high and no stock transition was going to work. I needed a four foot wide piece and very thick piece of red oak for a custom transition that the contractor carved for me. It needed to be 8/4 thickness in lumber yard terms. After checking around with some lumber yards, some said they could order what I needed but it would take a while to get in. The last one recommended I call Atlanta Hardwood. Holy cow, this place is a huge warehouse full of every kind of exotic wood you could want in random widths and industry thicknesses. Only a few miles from my house, I was floored at the selection. I found a perfect piece for my needs. 8/4 thickness, 7.5 inches wide. The board was 10 feet long. I took it up to the counter. The salesman asked how much I needed. I told him I only needed 4 feet. He said they will cut any board and sell what I needed as long as they are left with at least 6 feet. Bingo! 10-4=6. Then he pointed to a sign behind him. Forty-percent off 8/4 thickness boards during August. I walked out with the perfect 7.5" wide by 8/4 thick by 4 feet long red oak board for $20. If you are a wood working enthusiast in the Atlanta area, you need to visit this store. I've not seen anything like this place. Like a big box store with nothing but fine woods and veneers.
--
nohup rm -fr /&


sempergoofy
Premium
join:2001-07-06
Smyrna, GA
Reviews:
·AT&T Southeast
reply to Spork35

said by Spork35:

Did they happen to secure the dishwasher to the granite? There is 2 brackets to do so on the dishwasher typically and they failed to do that on ours. I ended up buying some brackets and doing it myself.

»www.granitegrabbers.com/

Yes. The granite installers discussed our plans with us, and we already had the dishwasher on site in the garage awaiting install. Some measurements were done, and with help from the contractor, a piece of the cabinet trim molding was secured at the correct position to the granite. When the dishwasher was finally installed screws were driven through the dishwasher's factory brackets into that piece of molding. So far, so good.

I noted on the Bosch dishwasher they also had in the install instructions that you could remove the brackets from on top and relocate them to the side to secure to the cabinet if desired.
--
nohup rm -fr /&

ctggzg
Premium
join:2005-02-11
USA
kudos:2
reply to sempergoofy

Looks nice, but sorry, what was wrong with the old stuff? How much time, energy, money, and material was trashed while redoing it?



nunya
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:12
Reviews:
·Charter
·voip.ms
·surpasshosting

1 recommendation

What was wrong with the old stuff? It was ugly.
I'd say 40-50 years is a pretty good run. I see morons around here that remodel every 5-10 years.

All houses are a waste of time, energy, money and materials. Technically, we could all get by just fine in tents, soddys, or caves.
--
I just might be the most "licensed" S.O.B. you know.


pandora
Premium
join:2001-06-01
Outland
kudos:2
Reviews:
·ooma
·Google Voice
·Comcast
·Future Nine Corp..

1 recommendation

reply to sempergoofy

The transformation is amazing and the change is very appealing. You made wonderful choices and I hope you get many years of pleasure from this improvement.

Thanks for posting all the pictures.
--
"People demand freedom of speech as a compensation for the freedom of thought which they seldom use."



sempergoofy
Premium
join:2001-07-06
Smyrna, GA
Reviews:
·AT&T Southeast

3 recommendations

reply to ctggzg

said by ctggzg:

Looks nice, but sorry, what was wrong with the old stuff? How much time, energy, money, and material was trashed while redoing it?

The issue with the old pine paneling was we were just tired of it after nearly 30 years in this house. As for the waste, I did look into recycling the pine paneling. But it did not come down easily. It was put up pretty well with finishing nails. Since each board was splitting somewhere despite the caution in removal, it was all trashed. The surface was varnished, making repainting it (about the only thing that might have been done to it) problematic at best since the surface had curved detail. If I owned a log cabin and wanted to continue the look I would have kept it.

As nunya See Profile points out, 40-50 years was a good run for the wall materials.

I made an effort to make the project "green" where feasible.

The dishwasher was on its last legs, and the stove was starting to get shaky on its legs with some capabilities no longer functioning.

On the recycling front, the cardboard from all of the cabinetry, appliances, and wood flooring was recycled at the local recycle center where they accept cardboard. The stryrofoam packing materials (which was significant in volume) were taken to Styrocyclers in Marietta. The contractor probably hates me for making them go to the effort of taking it there instead of throwing it in the dumpster. But my game, my rules.

On the energy conservation front, the wall insulation was brought up from 1970's R11 to R13. Insulation was blown into the entire attic to bring the depth up to 10 inches. Foam sealant was used around the window frames to stop drafts. A metal six panel exterior grade door now leads to the unconditioned basement/garage. The refrigerator and dishwasher are MUCH more energy efficient than those that were replaced. On the water conservation front, I no longer run water down the kitchen drain awaiting hot water at this furthest point from the water heater.

Were some resources wasted by remodeling? Undoubtedly. But I think we will be saving some energy and water that we formerly wasted.

As for the money that was spent, I look at it this way. I employed a lead-man for three months full time on site, and several subcontractors (electrical, plumbing, and others) got a day's pay (or two) and profit, on me in exchange for their labor/skill and my materials. In these hard economic times, compare that with your favorite financial institution's helping hand. (Cue patriotic music...) Doing my part to float the American economy.
--
nohup rm -fr /&


jester121
Premium
join:2003-08-09
Lake Zurich, IL

1 recommendation

reply to sempergoofy

I for one would like to see how the microwave turns out after you have the custom trim pieces installed. That was the one thing that jumped out at me as an "uh oh, what did he do?" question.

Very nice job.



sempergoofy
Premium
join:2001-07-06
Smyrna, GA
Reviews:
·AT&T Southeast

It has not shipped yet. Custom manufacture. The three inch shelf extension makes it odd. Based on discussion with the microtrim.com rep, I'll add a small piece of wood on the shelf surface even with the cabinet face on left and right sides. The trim will anchor to that. Obviously, the microwave will still extend three inches beyond. But the hole will be hidden. I'll follow up after receipt and installation.
--
nohup rm -fr /&



bryank

join:2000-03-23
Plainfield, IL
reply to sempergoofy

Isn't the outlet under the sink supposed to be GFCI?



08034016
Hallo lisa Aus Amerika
Premium
join:2001-08-31
Byron, GA

1 recommendation

reply to PSWired

said by PSWired:

Have you considered painting the brick fireplace?

There"s no way i would paint the Brick it will turn out Crappy,
--
Support
»www.minutemanproject.com/


49528867
Premium
join:2010-04-16
Fort Lauderdale, FL
kudos:3

1 recommendation

reply to bryank

said by bryank:

Isn't the outlet under the sink supposed to be GFCI?

I was wondering how long it would take before the "inspectors" came out.

That is now answered. :-(

Wayne
--
As a society deteriorates, image becomes more important than character, if you want to lead in restoring that society to its true character, capitalize upon that flaw.


49528867
Premium
join:2010-04-16
Fort Lauderdale, FL
kudos:3

1 recommendation

reply to sempergoofy

Excellent job...

Wayne



Snakeoil
Ignore Button. The coward's feature.
Premium
join:2000-08-05
Mentor, OH
kudos:1

1 recommendation

reply to sempergoofy

Very nice.



Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom

1 recommendation

reply to 49528867

said by 49528867:

I was wondering how long it would take before the "inspectors" came out.

That is now answered. :-(

Wayne

The OP did an excellent job of sharing his renovation project. The results were excellent but you're right the "inspectors" and super critics are always around.


dolphins
Clean Up Our Oceans
Premium
join:2001-08-22
Westville, NJ
kudos:7
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 recommendation

reply to sempergoofy

I would kill, maim, punch, look at someone unfavorably for a bigger kitchen.

But alas 3 of the 4 walls of my kitchen are bearing with the 4th being the basement stairwell.
--
Stop The Mindless Killings Stop Over Fishing



whizkid3
Premium,MVM
join:2002-02-21
Queens, NY
kudos:9

1 recommendation

reply to sempergoofy

said by sempergoofy:

old pine paneling was we were just tired of it after nearly 30 years in this house. As for the waste, I did look into recycling the pine paneling.

Jeeze. All that wood and you haven't built a fire in years!

We have ours cranking all winter.


PSWired

join:2006-03-26
Annapolis, MD

1 recommendation

reply to sempergoofy

Another idea for the fireplace--stacked flagstone veneer over the brick. See what you think of the photos at the bottom:

»norstone.com.au/st_rockpanel_ins···tion.asp



jrs8084
Premium
join:2002-03-02
Statesville, NC
kudos:1
Reviews:
·AT&T U-Verse

1 recommendation

reply to sempergoofy

Obviously, it is a very nice upgrade.

What I wonder is how long it will be in the future (maybe you will be off in assisted living) when some new owner comes in and starts renovating and starts tearing down the sheetrock in disbelief that anybody would dare cover up such "beautiful wood".

You know how history repeats itself.



Spork35

join:2011-07-13
Methuen, MA

said by jrs8084:

What I wonder is how long it will be in the future (maybe you will be off in assisted living) when some new owner comes in and starts renovating and starts tearing down the sheetrock in disbelief that anybody would dare cover up such "beautiful wood".

Why would they pull off the drywall on the ceiling?


sempergoofy
Premium
join:2001-07-06
Smyrna, GA
Reviews:
·AT&T Southeast
reply to PSWired

said by PSWired:

Another idea for the fireplace--stacked flagstone veneer over the brick. See what you think of the photos at the bottom:

»norstone.com.au/st_rockpanel_ins···tion.asp

That is a neat fireplace renovation, but my initial reaction is that those solutions would not lighten up the color enough unless enough really light flagstone could be acquired.
--
nohup rm -fr /&


sempergoofy
Premium
join:2001-07-06
Smyrna, GA
Reviews:
·AT&T Southeast
reply to Spork35

said by Spork35:

said by jrs8084:

What I wonder is how long it will be in the future (maybe you will be off in assisted living) when some new owner comes in and starts renovating and starts tearing down the sheetrock in disbelief that anybody would dare cover up such "beautiful wood".

Why would they pull off the drywall on the ceiling?

The future people will probably be saying, "@#$%& Why didn't they pull down the wood before putting up the drywall?" especially if all they are wanting to do is something like add a new box for a light. A simple keyhole saw event through drywall turns into a jigsaw or hole saw on a drill event.

If I had been doing the work myself, I would have pulled down the wood too just because. It certainly increases the destruction mess and then requires replacing insulation. But it would probably have avoided the seam cracking issue that had to be addressed later. Again, there was nothing so wrong with their plan to just go over the wood with drywall.

I have to keep a close eye on this, especially next summer when the heat is at its maximum again to assure the two things that were done to address it (screws through the boards into joists and additional insulation) were enough to prevent cracking. I have high confidence that the problem is gone. The work is warranted for a year, so I would have the option of calling them back to fix if it cracks again.
--
nohup rm -fr /&


bryank

join:2000-03-23
Plainfield, IL

1 recommendation

reply to 49528867

said by 49528867:

said by bryank:

Isn't the outlet under the sink supposed to be GFCI?

I was wondering how long it would take before the "inspectors" came out.

That is now answered. :-(

Wayne

I am an in no way an inspector but a DIY'er and I was simply asking a question pertaining to code/good practice. I don't post much in the Home Improvement forum instead I read and gain knowledge from all the pro's and guru's here. Sorry for asking a simple question.


Dennis
Premium,Mod
join:2001-01-26
Algonquin, IL
kudos:5

1 recommendation

said by bryank:

I am an in no way an inspector but a DIY'er and I was simply asking a question pertaining to code/good practice.

I think it was a valid question asked properly. Perhaps the circuit breaker is GFCI?
--
My Blog. Because I desperately need the acknowledgement of others.

Tabitha Ann Judd born 10/24: The Judd Family site!