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binkleym

join:2010-05-15
Ashland City, TN

Pulling a mile of fiber to the road

Hi all. I am trying to gauge the feasibility of pulling fiber to my parent's house. They live roughly 1 mile off the main road in a deep valley, and cable, cell, satellite isn't an option, and AT&T steadfastly refuses to roll out DSL either.

I have a decade of datacenter experience, so I'm comfortable with fiber, but have precisely zero experience with using it for outdoor plant. I would be trenching/laying it myself, and then get someone competent to splice and put connectors on.

What's a fair price per km on buried armored single-mode with 12 or 24 fibers?

I would like to lay the fiber in such a way that the plant could serve other houses if we subdivide the land (which I hope won't happen, but you never know). How is that usually handled? Do you pull one continuous cable with lengths of slack buried where you expect future use? Or do you lay fiber segments from location to location and splice them together in an outdoor junction box?

If I pull fiber to the curb, is it reasonable to presume AT&T and/or Charter can actually provision service over it? Do they usually have fiber in the "middle mile"? Is there a good way of finding out? Or do they charge kilobucks/arms/legs for that service?

Barring that, my idea is to place a cabinet with a cable modem and fiber/ethernet converter near the road and just run plain ethernet over the fiber to the house. Is that a good idea?

What else am I too dumb to ask?

Thanks for any help.


Killa200
Premium
join:2005-12-02
Southeast TN
Reviews:
·Charter
said by binkleym:

If I pull fiber to the curb, is it reasonable to presume AT&T and/or Charter can actually provision service over it?

No, they won't provision over it, and will only hand off to you on fiber if you pay the build from their drop point to yours and sign up for a corp based service plan, aka "kilobucks"

said by binkleym:

Barring that, my idea is to place a cabinet with a cable modem and fiber/ethernet converter near the road and just run plain ethernet over the fiber to the house. Is that a good idea?

What else am I too dumb to ask?

Thanks for any help.

That is your better and more likely options, if they will do a non addressable install to the pole junction and you hand it off yourself through media convertors. Only issue at that point is you supplying power to the junction to power the modem and media convertor.

Figure in 10% of the run length in numerous slack loops placed where the land bears signs of future issues or strategic places for future splicing. Figure 1 pair per future use (subdivided lots) unless you plan on doing wdm and providing the service yourself, then 1 fiber per future use. Then on top of that figure a pair or two for emergency use if anything breaks.

12 pair OSP armor with bury rating will run you around a buck a foot, so at a mile ~ 10% your looking at roughly $5900 in fiber alone.

binkleym

join:2010-05-15
Ashland City, TN
reply to binkleym
said by Killa200:

No, they won't provision over it, and will only hand off to you on fiber if you pay the build from their drop point to yours and sign up for a corp based service plan, aka "kilobucks"

When you're right, you're right... I was told by Charter it would cost $15k for a new node because they don't have a node in that neighborhood. This, despite the fact that I can see their cable line hanging on the pole, and that the person living on the main road beside our driveway has cable.

I also asked about hanging a cabinet with cable modem and fiber converter and treating that as the demarc. Nope. It has to be installed at an "actual address".

Of course, they have no problems whatsoever doing it, as long as I'm willing to pay over 2x the price it would cost to trench it myself.

I am unsure if there are valid legal reasons for their position or not.

I have written to AT&T hoping they have a more enlightened mindset. Sit and ponder the bleakness of the previous sentence for a moment.

Thanks for the help anyway.


tschmidt
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-12
Milford, NH
kudos:9
Reviews:
·G4 Communications
·Fairpoint Commun..
·Hollis Hosting
said by binkleym:

I was told by Charter it would cost $15k for a new node because they don't have a node in that neighborhood. This, despite the fact that I can see their cable line hanging on the pole, and that the person living on the main road beside our driveway has cable.

Not to sound like a Cable shill but that may not be as unreasonable as you think. Most cable systems are hybrid fiber coax (HFC). Fiber is the backbone and then nodes are installed close to the subscribers to convert fiber to coax. Depending on how the system was built out they nay need to do more then string fiber or coax.

You say Cable is nearby. Are there neighbors that would like Cable but cannot get it? If so you might be able to get the line extended if enough folks are willing to sign up.

/tom


CanerisIlija

join:2011-01-19
I am not sure how this functions south of the border, but there is one other option. Get a separate cable account in your name, at your neighbor's place. From there you can run the fiber.

Other option (not sure about feasability): Rent a temporary structure like a container, trailer or mobile home and have it parked by the curb. Mount a plate with your house number. Have them provision cable service to it and then just rip the coax out of it and put up a cabinet.
--
Ilija - Caneris Inc

70949076

join:2011-11-11
324005
reply to binkleym
its Fiber Deep, RF over glass (RFoG) or RFPON, full-blown fiber-to-the-premises, or passive optical network architectures, cable operators know they need to add more fiber to their networks. But theres not a one-size-fits-all fiber solution as vendors and cable operators are looking at different strategies for different scenarios, such as greenfield, brownfield, multi-dwelling units and business services applications.
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