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Morac
Cat god

join:2001-08-30
Riverside, NJ
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to pnh102

Re: Absolutely

said by pnh102:

There's 2 scenarios under which an ISP can make a lot of money with a cap:

1. Caps and overages give ISPs a huge disincentive against upgrading their networks. Why spend the millions of dollars on upgrades to allow for higher speeds when you can pocket the money spent on overages instead?

Or:

2. Upgrade the networks but leave the caps the same, or lower them. More customers will hit the cap faster.

Either scenario is a big winner for the ISPs.

Neither of those explain Comcast's cap implementation, which has no overages. If a user exceeds Comcast's 250 GB cap, something that is more and more likely to occur as time goes on, Comcast simply cuts off service.

So Comcast actually loses a customer and the money that customer is paying when the cap is exceeded.
--
The Comcast Disney Avatar has been retired.

Wilsdom

join:2009-08-06
Most customers ration usage and are unable to cancel their expensive cable TV plans. Others pay double for the same service they had before as "business class" customers, as if they are operating Fortune 500 IT departments in their homes.


ArrayList
netbus developer
Premium
join:2005-03-19
Brighton, MA
Reviews:
·RCN CABLE
·Comcast
said by Wilsdom:

Most customers ration usage and are unable to cancel their expensive cable TV plans. Others pay double for the same service they had before as "business class" customers, as if they are operating Fortune 500 IT departments in their homes.

don't know how much business class is where you live but the performance tier equivalent on business class where I live costs the same as the residential tier. both are $65/month. yes, if you want more speed it gets very expensive.


pnh102
Reptiles Are Cuddly And Pretty
Premium
join:2002-05-02
Mount Airy, MD
reply to Morac
said by Morac:

Neither of those explain Comcast's cap implementation, which has no overages. If a user exceeds Comcast's 250 GB cap, something that is more and more likely to occur as time goes on, Comcast simply cuts off service.

I thought they would "ask" you to go to the business class service. But either way, as much as I hate caps, I have to say Comcast's is the least worst implementation. They could actually make a genuine argument about it being about network congestion management.
--
"Net Neutrality" zealots - the people you can thank for your capped Internet service.


Morac
Cat god

join:2001-08-30
Riverside, NJ
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast
said by pnh102:

I thought they would "ask" you to go to the business class service. But either way, as much as I hate caps, I have to say Comcast's is the least worst implementation. They could actually make a genuine argument about it being about network congestion management.

From what I've read you can't actually get the business class service without a business tax ID so unless someone is running a business out of there home, there's no way to switch to business class.

As for congestion management, Comcast already has a separate mechanism for that that's independent of the cap. The cap is simply an anti-competition mechanism to prevent Internet companies from competing with Comcast's TV and VOIP services.
--
The Comcast Disney Avatar has been retired.

Crookshanks

join:2008-02-04
Binghamton, NY
How does a cap interfere with VoIP?


Morac
Cat god

join:2001-08-30
Riverside, NJ
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast
Third party VoIP (like Vonage or Ooma) uses data which counts towards the cap.

Or did you think that VoIP somehow magically works without sending or receiving data?
--
The Comcast Disney Avatar has been retired.

Rekrul

join:2007-04-21
Milford, CT
reply to Morac
said by Morac:

From what I've read you can't actually get the business class service without a business tax ID so unless someone is running a business out of there home, there's no way to switch to business class.

My ISP told me that as well, however...

I've been told that getting a business license is simple and cheap. You don't have to actually run a business, you just need the license and the tax ID number. It's not like they conduct inspections.

Kearnstd
Space Elf
Premium
join:2002-01-22
Mullica Hill, NJ
kudos:1
reply to Crookshanks
said by Crookshanks:

How does a cap interfere with VoIP?

third party does impact the cap, However VOIP also does not use that much bandwidth. you can get crystal clear calls on minimal bandwidth usage.

odds are you would have to be on the phone nonstop for the whole month to equal a day of streaming high quality video.
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[65 Arcanist]Filan(High Elf) Zone: Broadband Reports


Morac
Cat god

join:2001-08-30
Riverside, NJ
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast
said by Kearnstd:

third party does impact the cap, However VOIP also does not use that much bandwidth. you can get crystal clear calls on minimal bandwidth usage.

odds are you would have to be on the phone nonstop for the whole month to equal a day of streaming high quality video.

True, but it all adds up. A few hours of Netflix, a few hours talking on the phone, downloading some games of PSN/XBOX, backing up to "the cloud", etc and soon you're past your cap.
--
The Comcast Disney Avatar has been retired.


Selenia
Gentoo Convert
Premium
join:2006-09-22
Fort Smith, AR
kudos:2
reply to Kearnstd
My SIP setup streams @11 kbps using the open source Speex speech codec. 11kbpsx2 with maybe 2 overhead=24 kbps=3KB/sec. Unlike Skype(peer to peer), it hardly uses any bandwidth when idle. They can't kill VOIP with caps, even in mobile.

Crookshanks

join:2008-02-04
Binghamton, NY

1 edit
reply to Morac
said by Morac:

Or did you think that VoIP somehow magically works without sending or receiving data?

An uncompressed voice stream on the PSTN is 64kbit/s. Every VoIP implementation that I've seen uses compression/codecs to reduce this, sometimes to <20kbit/s. At 64kbit/s you could talk for eight hours a day and come out with a monthly total of 6.7GB. The actual usage would be substantially less than that.

Caps are meaningless in the context of VoIP.

thecp

join:2004-07-15
Sacramento, CA
reply to ArrayList
My friend in Sacramento, calif had to switch over to business class for comcast. In order to get the same pricing as when he had residential he had to sign for a 5 year contract. I'd rather stick a knife in my gut than be locked in for that long.


Uald

@comcast.net
said by thecp:

My friend in Sacramento, calif had to switch over to business class for comcast. In order to get the same pricing as when he had residential he had to sign for a 5 year contract. I'd rather stick a knife in my gut than be locked in for that long.

That's to waive installation costs. If you're willing to pay the high one time installation you can get business class without a contract. In my area it was $250 to get 'installation' (the cables were already there so basically the guy said, 'Here's a business cable modem') but it was contract free. If you're ok with the lowest tier it isn't that much more than residential. (now if you want higher speeds you really pay for it at 50Mbps/$189 and 100Mbps/$389 a month)


ArrayList
netbus developer
Premium
join:2005-03-19
Brighton, MA
Reviews:
·RCN CABLE
·Comcast
reply to thecp
said by thecp:

My friend in Sacramento, calif had to switch over to business class for comcast. In order to get the same pricing as when he had residential he had to sign for a 5 year contract. I'd rather stick a knife in my gut than be locked in for that long.

I had no idea that they would do contracts that long. quite a bit can change in 5 years.