dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
8641
share rss forum feed


AdamB

join:2001-01-07
Columbus, OH

Cost to replace electrical outlets

I know there are some electricians around here so I was hoping someone could give me a guestimate on what it would cost to replace 15-20 electrical outlets. My mom's house is mostly 2 prong outlets and she has to use those adapters for so many things that it doesn't seem safe or practical. My only concern is that my dad and uncle rewired the house over 30 years ago and neither of them were electricians so I don't want this to turn into some huge project to rewire the whole house.


Jahntassa
What, I can have feathers
Premium
join:2006-04-14
Conway, SC
kudos:4
Anywhere from "A little" to "A lot". Unfortunately I don't believe anyone can give you a reasonable answer via the internet. It depends on the existing panel, existing wiring, and existing outlets, not to mention the re-wiring job. Your best bet is to call around to several local companies and get some quotes.


AdamB

join:2001-01-07
Columbus, OH
reply to AdamB
Some outlets are 3 pronged so there must be adequate wiring for those. I'm guessing what it would cost to just remove the current hardware and put in new. I could do it myself, but I am not a big fan of working with electricity.


CylonRed
Premium,MVM
join:2000-07-06
Bloom County
Not necessarily true - they could have grounded those outlets using water lines (no longer code for most places) or they ground them to the box which also is not necessarily kosher.

I have several outlets that are 'grounded' but no where is there 3 wires coming into the box.

I am certain that we do not have 3 wires going to any of the boxes. Cost will increase to do it correctly.
--
Brian

"It drops into your stomach like a Abrams's tank.... driven by Rosanne Barr..." A. Bourdain

Waterbug

join:2008-03-30
reply to AdamB
said by AdamB:

Some outlets are 3 pronged so there must be adequate wiring for those. I'm guessing what it would cost to just remove the current hardware and put in new. I could do it myself, but I am not a big fan of working with electricity.

Don't just remove a 2 prong receptacle and replace it with a three prong receptacle, unless there are 3 wires in the outlet box. Even then, you should verify that the third wire (ground) has con tenuity to the ground in your main panel.


nunya
LXI 483
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:12
Reviews:
·Charter
·voip.ms
reply to AdamB
Most likely, if two prong outlets are present, then ground wires would have to be run to each outlet. Or, all the wiring would need to be replaced.

If there are "real" and functional ground wires at the outlets, then it would be simple. This is a rare find in my travels.

Most houses in the US built in the last 50 years are wired with romex cable or BX. Romex must have an additional ground wire under the sheath in order to be useful. BX must have an incorporated bonding strip / wire under the metallic jacket (most BX does NOT, and therefore is not a suitable path to ground).

In the off chance the home was wired with non-flexible metallic conduit, MC, or AC cable, then there would probably be a suitable ground.

I find 3 prong receptacles improperly installed on systems without an EGC all the time. This is a very dangerous practice. Just like the "cheater" plugs are very dangerous.

Your best bet is to call a local licensed electrician and have them look at it.

Personally, in my own home most of the receptacles are still 2 prong. I've only run grounds to the receptacles that really need them.

There are many approaches to retro grounding, but only someone with intimate access to the home can provide real answers. Everything you read on this forum is pure conjecture, because we aren't there.
--
I just might be the most "licensed" S.O.B. you know.


AdamB

join:2001-01-07
Columbus, OH
reply to AdamB
Well I do know the panel is grounded because since last winter when a storm pulled the main line and meter off the house. An electrician came out then to fix up the wiring from the meter and installed a ground. I'm not sure if that is a good sign or not.

If someone does come out and find there is no way to do this without rewiring can we just refuse further work? Other than having to use the dumb adapters it really isn't a problem. I wouldn't want them to be able to force a code update.

garys_2k
Premium
join:2004-05-07
Farmington, MI
Sure, the PANEL is likely grounded, but are ground conductors present in the runs from the panel to the outlets? That's the question.


CylonRed
Premium,MVM
join:2000-07-06
Bloom County
reply to AdamB
Yes - get an estimate and during that, an electrician should be able to tell what would need to be done and you can choose not to do the work.

My box is grounded as well...
--
Brian

"It drops into your stomach like a Abrams's tank.... driven by Rosanne Barr..." A. Bourdain

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
reply to AdamB
said by AdamB:

If someone does come out and find there is no way to do this without rewiring can we just refuse further work? Other than having to use the dumb adapters it really isn't a problem. I wouldn't want them to be able to force a code update.

You can always install GFCI outlets and label them with the "no ground" stickers. It is not as good as actually having a ground but it is code compliant and is safer than using adapters,


Paolo
Mr. Wireless

join:2004-05-29
canada
gfci wont be good, he probaly also has aluminum wires if its no ground, and a gfci wont work with aluminum wires, it will trip
--
Happiness is like peeing your pants... Everyone can see it, but only you can feel its Warmth!!

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
Aluminum wire has nothing to do with no ground. In fact, aluminum wires and two wire cable without a ground wire are from very different decades.


ttiiggy
Premium
join:2001-03-27
Bozeman, MT
reply to AdamB
said by AdamB:

Well I do know the panel is grounded because since last winter when a storm pulled the main line and meter off the house. An electrician came out then to fix up the wiring from the meter and installed a ground.

You might be able to tell what vintage of wiring is installed by seeing what they look like inside the main panel.
No guarantees what goes past the first box in the run, though.


hortnut
Huh?

join:2005-09-25
PNW
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to AdamB
I seem to recall an almost exact question coming up in September, with a fairly extensive discussion-

I think this thread covers a situation very similar to yours-
»ungrounded outlets - best options to deal with them?

Not so much as to cost, but how to do the job of adding ground when none is present.


fartness
computersoc dot com
Premium
join:2003-03-25
Look Outside
reply to AdamB
My one bedroom has three outlets. All put in at different times in the past 80 years. All were 2 prong. The newest one had a ground wire in it, so that can have a normal one. The electrician hooked up a normal 3 prong with some older ground wire in it to the 2nd outlet. The 3rd outlet has no ground so the electrician said I need a GFI for it and to label it no ground. He showed me what to do when I get the chance and labeled the wires. Doesn't look too hard.


skuv

@rr.com
reply to Paolo
said by Paolo:

gfci wont be good, he probaly also has aluminum wires if its no ground, and a gfci wont work with aluminum wires, it will trip

Aluminum wire is fine with GFCI.


dennismurphy
Put me on hold? I'll put YOU on hold
Premium
join:2002-11-19
Parsippany, NJ
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
reply to nunya
said by nunya:

If there are "real" and functional ground wires at the outlets, then it would be simple. This is a rare find in my travels.

I was so, so very lucky in my previous home. The house was built in 1961; most circuits were NM with 2-prong outlets, however, there was a ground wire present in the NM and terminated in each outlet box. I was able to install 3-prong outlets by pig tailing the outlet to the ground in the box.

Thankfully, my 'new' home (built in '68) has all 3-prong outlets. What a difference 7 years make.

tberg

join:2001-08-23
Greenville, SC
I had one weird house that was built about '64 or '65. The lighting circuits had no ground wire at all, but the outlets had a ground connector. The romex used as 14/2, but the ground wire in it was about 18 gauge, not 14 like the main conductors.


Paolo
Mr. Wireless

join:2004-05-29
canada
reply to skuv
said by skuv :

said by Paolo:

gfci wont be good, he probaly also has aluminum wires if its no ground, and a gfci wont work with aluminum wires, it will trip

Aluminum wire is fine with GFCI.

Read the CEC, its not fine, and We've attempted to install them, they do not work. once we replaced them and put them in a home with copper wiring they started to work just fine. which means? the WIRES are theculprit. it even says so in the CEC
--
Happiness is like peeing your pants... Everyone can see it, but only you can feel its Warmth!!


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
reply to tberg
said by tberg:

I had one weird house that was built about '64 or '65. The lighting circuits had no ground wire at all, but the outlets had a ground connector. The romex used as 14/2, but the ground wire in it was about 18 gauge, not 14 like the main conductors.

Weird, maybe my house is not up to code.

The ground wire for my outlets is a bare copper 12 gauge. If that's OK, then I guess that could be a solution? Running a grounded bare copper wire to every outlet and thus having the proper 3 wires for a 3-prong outlet.

Light fixtures don't have grounding, but it would be useless, as light sockets don't have a ground connection.


Paolo
Mr. Wireless

join:2004-05-29
canada
the box would be grounded, the light fixture screws into the boxes, thus making the ground connection
--
Happiness is like peeing your pants... Everyone can see it, but only you can feel its Warmth!!


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
said by Paolo:

the box would be grounded, the light fixture screws into the boxes, thus making the ground connection

Ah, the more I know. I haven`t gotten to that point in my house renos yet


nunya
LXI 483
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:12
Reviews:
·Charter
·voip.ms
reply to Paolo

Read the CEC, its not fine, and We've attempted to install them, they do not work. once we replaced them and put them in a home with copper wiring they started to work just fine. which means? the WIRES are theculprit. it even says so in the CEC


This is totally incorrect. The laws of physics do not magically change in Canada. GFCI receptacles work just fine with aluminum wire. You just can't terminate the aluminum wire directly to the receptacle. They must be pigtailed with CopAlum or AlumiConn. No device manufacturer makes a GFCI receptacle suitable for use with aluminum terminations. If the situation allows, it's usually simpler to use a GFCI breaker.

I highly recommend that anyone in a house with aluminum wiring consider replacing their breakers with AFCI.
--
I just might be the most "licensed" S.O.B. you know.


Paolo
Mr. Wireless

join:2004-05-29
canada
instead of beating around the bush, you coulda said just what you said now before. Guess what your doing? your connecting COPPER wires to a GFCI. Of Course thats going to work, obviously your making a pigtail connection, listen im not dumb, I know just as much as you do, but its how you WORD the equation. I said connecting aluminum directly to a GFCI is not allowed and will not work, it will trip and never reset. I stand corrected. If I had a pigtail with copper, then that is the same thing as connecting a physical coper wire to a gfci which IS ALLOWED. thanks mr smart alex.
--
Happiness is like peeing your pants... Everyone can see it, but only you can feel its Warmth!!


cableties
Premium
join:2005-01-27
reply to AdamB
Per Nunya:

"Your best bet is to call a local licensed electrician and have them look at it."

+1
--
Splat