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newview
Ex .. Ex .. Exactly
Premium
join:2001-10-01
Parsonsburg, MD
kudos:1
Reviews:
·DIRECTV
·Comcast
reply to mariod

Re: Trying to get an HDMI DVR...insanity realized

said by mariod:

said by newview:

I had to use the DVI out and use a DVI-to-HDMI adapter. The resulting picture was 100% better.

The picture from a DVI-HDMI connection was "100% better" than a component connection??

That statement defies science and logic.

Regardless of what YOU think ... three other people in the room (besides myself) viewing the resulting picture said the same thing.


Floppy

join:2002-07-03

said by newview:

said by mariod:

said by newview:

I had to use the DVI out and use a DVI-to-HDMI adapter. The resulting picture was 100% better.

The picture from a DVI-HDMI connection was "100% better" than a component connection??

That statement defies science and logic.

Regardless of what YOU think ... three other people in the room (besides myself) viewing the resulting picture said the same thing.

I agree with Mariod, but I guess in your case perception is 9/10s of the law.


OSUGoose

join:2007-12-27
Columbus, OH
reply to mogamer

Oh they know what they have just no one but the warehouse probally uses it, or knows how to access it.



airwavz
Always the green wire

join:2011-09-11
Mount Juliet, TN
kudos:1

1 recommendation

reply to mariod

You can rest assured that a DVI (Digital Video Interface) connection is FAR superior to a component (analog) connection, assuming a relatively new digital TV. To state otherwise "defies science and logic".

100% better may not be technically 'correct', but it is a common expression and conveys the poster's perception of the degree of improvement.



Master Wolfe

join:2009-04-04
Panama City Beach, FL

Not trying to get into the middle of this, but found this here.

»www.ecoustics.com/electronics/pr···868.html

Isn't Digital Just Better?

It is often supposed by writers on this subject that "digital is better." Digital signal transfer, it is assumed, is error-free, while analog signals are always subject to some amount of degradation and information loss. There is an element of truth to this argument, but it tends to fly in the face of real-world considerations. First, there is no reason why any perceptible degradation of an analog component video signal should occur even over rather substantial distances; the maximum runs in home theater installations do not present a challenge for analog cabling built to professional standards. Second, it is a flawed assumption to suppose that digital signal handling is always error-free. DVI and HDMI signals aren't subject to error correction; once information is lost, it's lost for good. That is not a consideration with well-made cable over short distances, but can easily become a factor at distance.



newview
Ex .. Ex .. Exactly
Premium
join:2001-10-01
Parsonsburg, MD
kudos:1
Reviews:
·DIRECTV
·Comcast
reply to airwavz

said by airwavz:

You can rest assured that a DVI (Digital Video Interface) connection is FAR superior to a component (analog) connection, assuming a relatively new digital TV. To state otherwise "defies science and logic".

C/Net Agrees ...

»www.youtube.com/watch?v=eAHpt-A2h5E

mariod

join:2009-06-16

1 recommendation

reply to airwavz

said by newview:

Regardless of what YOU think ... three other people in the room (besides myself) viewing the resulting picture said the same thing.

said by airwavz:

You can rest assured that a DVI (Digital Video Interface) connection is FAR superior to a component (analog) connection, assuming a relatively new digital TV. To state otherwise "defies science and logic".

100% better may not be technically 'correct', but it is a common expression and conveys the poster's perception of the degree of improvement.

That may be the perception, but its wrong.

The ONLY non-3d (because that utilizes two way communication) benefit of HDMI is simplification of wires. It turns four cords (3 component and an audio) into one cord. HDMI provides ABSOLUTELY ZERO improvement on audio or video quality over component and optical cables.

The only real world possibly is that the component jack out of the STB, or into the TV/Receiver, is degraded/dirty while the DVI/HDMI jack is not.

Barring that, your 100% improvement is pure placebo effect.


airwavz
Always the green wire

join:2011-09-11
Mount Juliet, TN
kudos:1

1 recommendation

said by mariod:

The ONLY non-3d benefit of HDMI is simplification of wires. It turns four cords (3 component and an audio) into one cord. HDMI provides ABSOLUTELY ZERO improvement on audio or video quality over component and optical cables.

The only real world possibly is that the component jack out of the STB, or into the TV/Receiver, is degraded/dirty while the DVI/HDMI jack is not.

Barring that, your 100% improvement is pure placebo effect.

A Digital connection provides many benefits in addition to the reduction of cables - an analog signal is subject to noise, electrical interference, phase degradation, capacitance of the cable causing high frequency distortion/loss, etc. while a digital connection is virtually immune to all but the strongest of electrical interference and suffers no phase or capacitance anomalies. It's not about the cable, it's the format of the signal. The results are scientifically demonstrable.

Now perception is a personal matter, as I still prefer a quality analog audio recording over a typical digital one, but it can be shown on an oscilloscope or spectrum analyzer that the digital recording is much more accurate when compared to the original. Whether recording medium or transmission medium, digital is more 'accurate' than analog. You may see "ABSOLUTELY ZERO improvement" with HDMI or DVI, but the reality is that a digital connection conveys the HD video signal far more accurately than ANY analog connection is capable of. It's not my opinion, it is a fact - which any electrical engineer with experience in both mediums will gladly confirm. As a veteran of the broadcast industry of OVER 30 YEARS, I can assure you I've dealt with multitudes of both analog and digital connections, and digital is ALWAYS the most accurate connection/transport method.
I can also add that I too started with a component connection from my STB to my HDTV - swapping the box for a different model with HDMI improved MY picture "100%" -

It's not rocket science, but it IS science...

CTMustang
Premium
join:2007-09-10
France
reply to mariod

said by mariod:

said by newview:

Regardless of what YOU think ... three other people in the room (besides myself) viewing the resulting picture said the same thing.

said by airwavz:

You can rest assured that a DVI (Digital Video Interface) connection is FAR superior to a component (analog) connection, assuming a relatively new digital TV. To state otherwise "defies science and logic".

100% better may not be technically 'correct', but it is a common expression and conveys the poster's perception of the degree of improvement.

That may be the perception, but its wrong.

The ONLY non-3d (because that utilizes two way communication) benefit of HDMI is simplification of wires. It turns four cords (3 component and an audio) into one cord. HDMI provides ABSOLUTELY ZERO improvement on audio or video quality over component and optical cables.

The only real world possibly is that the component jack out of the STB, or into the TV/Receiver, is degraded/dirty while the DVI/HDMI jack is not.

Barring that, your 100% improvement is pure placebo effect.

HDMI VS Component, you can clearly see a difference in my home. I have no idea if the cause is because the wires run real close to two subwoofers, or through the closet that houses all my security/internet/audio stuff but there is a CLEAR difference and HDMI is the winner.

miscDude

join:2005-03-24
Kissimmee, FL

1 recommendation

reply to lorennerol

Unless you are looking at cheap as hell cables, bad connections, an above average cable run, or an EXTREMELY noisy environment, It's highly unlikely that you will notice any major difference from a signal sent from a cable STB to a TV via HDMI or Component cabling. With a typical 3ft-6ft cable, That's just not enough length for the digital vs. analog signal degradation to really become a factor.

Keep in mind, this is talking about a Cable STB signal. HD video from cable providers is only sent at 720p or 1080i, which a Component cable is perfectly cable of sending. Other HDVideo Sources (such as BluRay Players) can be capable of 1080p and increased frame rates, in which case HDMI is the only way to go. You are also talking about a source video sent via RF and compressed, so the source Video is going to be impacted long before your little 6ft component cable has any chance to impact the video signal.

Now, There COULD be other factors that can impact the Component vs. HDMI Image quality beyond simple subjectivity of the viewer, but these have nothing to do with the quality of the input signal and EVERYTHING to do with the display device. Specifically:

* Most modern monitors will have different video settings for each input. Your HDMI input could very well have better tuned Noise Correction, contrast, color quality, sharpness, or GAMMA settings for your environment. Remember that the "factory Default" settings are often tuned for under florescent lighting on a store's sale floor and not typical lighting for home viewing.

* Monitor's Signal processors. You Monitor needs to convert whatever incoming signal into the picture. depending on the quality of those processors, there is always a chance that it might handle some signal types better than others. It could also automatically add additional processing to some input types to sharpen or "correct" an image.


mariod

join:2009-06-16
reply to lorennerol

This "Digital is Better!" argument is pure gobbledy gook.

»www.highdefforum.com/directv-for···ter.html

Isn't Digital Just Better?

It is often supposed by writers on this subject that "digital is better." Digital signal transfer, it is assumed, is error-free, while analog signals are always subject to some amount of degradation and information loss. There is an element of truth to this argument, but it tends to fly in the face of real-world considerations. First, there is no reason why any perceptible degradation of an analog component video signal should occur even over rather substantial distances; the maximum runs in home theater installations do not present a challenge for analog cabling built to professional standards. Second, it is a flawed assumption to suppose that digital signal handling is always error-free. DVI and HDMI signals aren't subject to error correction; once information is lost, it's lost for good. That is not a consideration with well-made cable over short distances, but can easily become a factor at distance.
[...]

The argument often made for the DVI or HDMI signal formats is the "pure digital" argument--that by taking a digital recording, such as a DVD or a digital satellite signal, and rendering it straight into digital form as a DVI or HDMI signal, and then delivering that digital signal straight to the display, there is a sort of a perfect no-loss-and-no-alteration-of-information signal chain. If the display itself is a native digital display (e.g. an LCD or Plasma display), the argument goes, the signal never has to undergo digital-to-analog conversion and therefore is less altered along the way.

That might be true, were it not for the fact that digital signals are encoded in different ways and have to be converted, and that these signals have to be scaled and processed to be displayed. Consequently, there are always conversions going on, and these conversions aren't always easy going. "Digital to digital" conversion is no more a guarantee of signal quality than "digital to analog," and in practice may be substantially worse. Whether it's better or worse will depend upon the circuitry involved--and that is something which isn't usually practical to figure out. As a general rule, with consumer equipment, one simply doesn't know how signals are processed, and one doesn't know how that processing varies by input. Analog and digital inputs must either be scaled through separate circuits, or one must be converted to the other to use the same scaler. How is that done? In general, you won't find an answer to that anywhere in your instruction manual, and even if you did, it'd be hard to judge which is the better scaler without viewing the actual video output. It's fair to say, in general, that even in very high-end consumer gear, the quality of circuits for signal processing and scaling is quite variable.

Not to mention being digital also means drop outs, which won't exist in analog.


not

@comcast.net

1 edit
reply to mariod

said by mariod:

Your comparison is wildly off target.

You're paying for services, not the devices that provide them. There's no indication that the services you get from Comcast are anything but what you've asked for.

Everyone pays the same price for the same services. Therefore, it is only equitable that the equipment be shipped out blindly.

We pay enough to Comcast to warrant the expectation that they give us what we want. The OP wants proper sound and picture quality for their money, something Comcast will plaster every Comcast commercial with. The right thing to do is to retire all those old POS boxes and go with the new ones, but nooooo, Comcast wants to maximize the black in the bottom line for their company instead of doing the right thing for the consumer they're ripping off and providing them with equal value or the dollar they're spending.

What the OP needs to do in this case is file both an FCC and BBB complaint against Comcast in this case. Anytime something you don't agree with is done by a large corporation, do your due diligence and file the necessary paperwork to bring negative attention to their actions. These are the tools you've been handcuffed to use, USE THEM until something better comes along.

RalphKramden

join:2007-01-10
Newtown, PA

said by not :

... but nooooo, Comcast wants to maximize the black in the bottom line for their company instead of doing the right thing for the consumer they're ripping off and providing them with equal value or the dollar they're spending.

What the OP needs to do in this case is file both an FCC and BBB complaint against Comcast in this case. Anytime something you don't agree with is done by a large corporation, do your due diligence and file the necessary paperwork to bring negative attention to their actions. These are the tools you've been handcuffed to use, USE THEM until something better comes along.

Sorry Charlie - Comcast is SUPPOSED to maximize the bottom line. That's what public companies do - they make money for the stock holders.

Something better has come along for dealing with companies with policies you don't like. If you and the OP think Comcast is ripping you off and not offering fair value in exchange for your subscription, STOP SENDING THEM YOUR MONEY. Most effective tool there is.


comcrp01

@comcast.net

Companies that have real competition in the market place balance the bottom line with customer satisfaction, otherwise they won't survive the market.


lorennerol
Premium
join:2003-10-29
Seattle, WA
reply to RalphKramden

said by RalphKramden:

Sorry Charlie - Comcast is SUPPOSED to maximize the bottom line. That's what public companies do - they make money for the stock holders.

That's not entirely true when said corporation is granted a monopoly by local or state governments. In this case they are sometimes obliged by these contracts to behave in ways that do not maximize profit.

Meanwhile, I'd really like to be able to hook an HD DVR up to my projector. It's a 30 foot run, which excludes component cables. So the "they are equal' argument is moot, regardless of whether it's true.


Caddyroger
Premium
join:2001-06-11
To the west
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 edit
reply to not

said by not :

said by mariod:

Your comparison is wildly off target.

You're paying for services, not the devices that provide them. There's no indication that the services you get from Comcast are anything but what you've asked for.

Everyone pays the same price for the same services. Therefore, it is only equitable that the equipment be shipped out blindly.

We pay enough to Comcast to warrant the expectation that they give us what we want. The OP wants proper sound and picture quality for their money, something Comcast will plaster every Comcast commercial with. The right thing to do is to retire all those old POS boxes and go with the new ones, but nooooo, Comcast wants to maximize the black in the bottom line for their company instead of doing the right thing for the consumer they're ripping off and providing them with equal value or the dollar they're spending.

What the OP needs to do in this case is file both an FCC and BBB complaint against Comcast in this case. Anytime something you don't agree with is done by a large corporation, do your due diligence and file the necessary paperwork to bring negative attention to their actions. These are the tools you've been handcuffed to use, USE THEM until something better comes along.

Where does say you will provided with equipment of your choice? The only thing it does say is hd dvr. it does not say Pace, Motorola, or SA. It does not it will come with HDMI, Componet outputs. Have fun getting laughed at by the BBB and fcc for making a dumb statement?
Oh by the way I have never worked or ever will work for Comcast.
--
Caddy


IowaCowboy
Iowa native
Premium
join:2010-10-16
Springfield, MA
Reviews:
·Verizon Broadban..
·Comcast
reply to lorennerol

An even better solution would be to just go to Best Buy and get a TiVo box (I have two of them with lifetime subs on them) and all you'll need from Comcast is a CableCard. I have had MANY issues with the Comcast DVRs and ZERO issues with the TiVos. Plus the TiVos have a larger Hard Drive and you can pay more to get a larger HD or use an external HD. I know Comcast here charges $18 per month for a DVR and I have two TVs so that is two DVRs. As for Comcast and their junk DVRs, my setup is $36 of lost revenue for Comcast minus the $6 for the second CableCard. Plus I own my EMTA which is another $7 in lost revenue for Comcast.

When I got rid of DirecTV and had Comcast installed, the installer (a contractor) brought an old piece of Junk DVR and I requested two, he brought one and it was broken. I had to swap it at the office and they gave me a DCX 3400. Later that summer, I had an unexpected windfall and I went to Best Buy and bought two TiVo DVRs and purchased lifetime subs on them. It was a win-win for me as I got a better DVR while lowering my Comcast bill by a good chunk. So I can use the money that I would spend on equipment rentals and spend it on service upgrades instead (such as the Extreme 50 internet upgrade, which adds $40 per month to the bill, and it is worth it because YouTube works better among other benefits).
--
All of my CPE (including my EMTA) is customer owned. The only Comcast owned equipment in my house is the CableCards in the two TiVO boxes I own.


mariod

join:2009-06-16

1 edit

said by IowaCowboy:

An even better solution would be to just go to Best Buy and get a TiVo box (I have two of them with lifetime subs on them) and all you'll need from Comcast is a CableCard. I have had MANY issues with the Comcast DVRs and ZERO issues with the TiVos. Plus the TiVos have a larger Hard Drive and you can pay more to get a larger HD or use an external HD. I know Comcast here charges $18 per month for a DVR and I have two TVs so that is two DVRs. As for Comcast and their junk DVRs, my setup is $36 of lost revenue for Comcast minus the $6 for the second CableCard. Plus I own my EMTA which is another $7 in lost revenue for Comcast.

When I got rid of DirecTV and had Comcast installed, the installer (a contractor) brought an old piece of Junk DVR and I requested two, he brought one and it was broken. I had to swap it at the office and they gave me a DCX 3400. Later that summer, I had an unexpected windfall and I went to Best Buy and bought two TiVo DVRs and purchased lifetime subs on them. It was a win-win for me as I got a better DVR while lowering my Comcast bill by a good chunk. So I can use the money that I would spend on equipment rentals and spend it on service upgrades instead (such as the Extreme 50 internet upgrade, which adds $40 per month to the bill, and it is worth it because YouTube works better among other benefits).

Wow, that sounds amazing!

From everything you're saying "windfall", "money I would spend on equipment rentals", I guess you got your tivo dvrs for free!

Too bad the rest of us would have to pay hundreds of dollars and then pay monthly fees to Tivo.

Edit: Oh, I forgot, how's the On Demand lineup look on your Tivo? You know, that service you are paying for with tons of programming on it?


DrDrew
That others may surf
Premium
join:2009-01-28
SoCal
kudos:15
reply to lorennerol

said by lorennerol:

It's a 30 foot run, which excludes component cables.

Not sure why 30' excludes the use of component cables. You can easily get them in 50' and 100' lengths.
»www.monoprice.com/products/subde···id=10235

But if you HAVE to get a HDMI box the only solution is to bug the local Comcast office about it, maybe speak or write to the local office Customer Service manager.
--
If it's important, back it up... twice. Even 99.999% availability isn't enough sometimes.


bobjohnson
Premium
join:2007-02-03
Orlando, FL
Reviews:
·AT&T U-Verse
·T-Mobile US
·Sprint Mobile Br..
reply to lorennerol

Just for the record. HDMI looks and sounds better than component. Just saying. Anyhow, schedule a truck roll with a tier 1 csr as an upgrade and tell them to put in the notes that you want dvr model # whatever and when they tell you they can't just say "that's ok but can you make sure it's on the work order?" The contractors look at the notes and try to get the right stuff to make the jobs as fast and easy as possible.
--



flwpwr

@comcast.net
reply to Master Wolfe

He actually means the gray moto boxes, but the mail order is supposed to ALL support HDMI so you should definitely at least get an HDMI box that way, which leaves the techs and cable store getting more of the old non-HDMI ones..


lorennerol
Premium
join:2003-10-29
Seattle, WA

said by flwpwr :

He actually means the gray moto boxes...

Correct, the DCT models (I didn't know the model offhand and didn't look it up).

»customer.comcast.com/Pages/FAQVi···-top-Box

Thank you to the folks offering constructive suggestions!


not

@comcast.net
reply to mariod

said by mariod:

Wow, that sounds amazing!

From everything you're saying "windfall", "money I would spend on equipment rentals", I guess you got your tivo dvrs for free!

Too bad the rest of us would have to pay hundreds of dollars and then pay monthly fees to Tivo.

Edit: Oh, I forgot, how's the On Demand lineup look on your Tivo? You know, that service you are paying for with tons of programming on it?

Ya, tons of programming that's not free. lol How does Comcast justify charging over $5 for a movie rental back from the 80's? That's rediculous considering I can watch the same move via Crackle or another legit online stream service AT NO CHARGE. Heck, sometimes the movies they charge for on On Demand are often being played on cable for free, so how do they justify it? It's rediculous and the selection isn't all that great either if you ask me. Stop trying to sell Comcast and their services as a godsend.

GTFan

join:2004-12-03
reply to mariod

said by mariod:

said by IowaCowboy:

An even better solution would be to just go to Best Buy and get a TiVo box (I have two of them with lifetime subs on them) and all you'll need from Comcast is a CableCard. I have had MANY issues with the Comcast DVRs and ZERO issues with the TiVos. Plus the TiVos have a larger Hard Drive and you can pay more to get a larger HD or use an external HD. I know Comcast here charges $18 per month for a DVR and I have two TVs so that is two DVRs. As for Comcast and their junk DVRs, my setup is $36 of lost revenue for Comcast minus the $6 for the second CableCard. Plus I own my EMTA which is another $7 in lost revenue for Comcast.

When I got rid of DirecTV and had Comcast installed, the installer (a contractor) brought an old piece of Junk DVR and I requested two, he brought one and it was broken. I had to swap it at the office and they gave me a DCX 3400. Later that summer, I had an unexpected windfall and I went to Best Buy and bought two TiVo DVRs and purchased lifetime subs on them. It was a win-win for me as I got a better DVR while lowering my Comcast bill by a good chunk. So I can use the money that I would spend on equipment rentals and spend it on service upgrades instead (such as the Extreme 50 internet upgrade, which adds $40 per month to the bill, and it is worth it because YouTube works better among other benefits).

Wow, that sounds amazing!

From everything you're saying "windfall", "money I would spend on equipment rentals", I guess you got your tivo dvrs for free!

Too bad the rest of us would have to pay hundreds of dollars and then pay monthly fees to Tivo.

Edit: Oh, I forgot, how's the On Demand lineup look on your Tivo? You know, that service you are paying for with tons of programming on it?

It is amazing, seeing as if you can get used Tivo HDs w/lifetime subs on fleabay or craigslist for $350 or less, and which will generally pay for themselves in less than 2 years vs. renting. And it's so much better than the Moto crap DVR that Comcast uses here it's not even funny.

On Demand? Who cares? I record what I want to watch, not what Comcast thinks I might like. Most of On Demand is junk anyway (I had a Comcast STB long ago and nothing there was stuff I cared about or couldn't have recorded myself), and with xfinityTV website I could catch pretty much any show I missed anyway.

Oh and BTW, the Tivo Premieres will be getting On Demand soon, and if you have an Xbox360 you also get it with a Comcast sub.

I'll repeat what I said in another thread - you diss Tivos because you've never used them and don't know any better. That's ok, but don't dismiss them just because you don't want to do the research on the box and the purchase options. There's no reason to pay $550-600 for a new one when they are widely available for at least $200 less on the secondhand market, and they will run rings around any Comcast DVR.


Anonymous
Premium
join:2004-06-01
IA
kudos:2
reply to joako

said by joako:

Yes they can't guarantee anything but just have them schedule a free truck roll to bring the box you need. If they don't have the box you need they will need to keep on scheduling free truck rolls until someone does and that costs them money.

There is no way they can honor your request for a specific model, but they should have no problem with honoring a basic reasonable request for a DVR with HDMI.

Funny. Except they can charge you for every one of those truck rolls.
--
I speak for myself, not my employer.


GDouglas2

@hydroone.com
reply to mariod

Hello,

said by mariod:

The ONLY non-3d (because that utilizes two way communication) benefit of HDMI is simplification of wires. It turns four cords (3 component and an audio) into one cord. HDMI provides ABSOLUTELY ZERO improvement on audio or video quality over component and optical cables.

With well-tuned equipment, this may sometimes be the case that HDMI and Component is indistinguishable. Good calibration, good tracking/phase, and regular video material, and good electronics for both outputs, the use of the same deinterlacer/video processing, the same format (i.e. 1080i), then the visual perception difference of HDMI versus Copmonent, may very well be indistinguishable.

BUT.... Unfortunately, many displays often use separate electronics for the HDMI and for the component, and some boxes output a different color settings (i.e. worse picture adjustment settings, bad sharpness setting, bad contrast setting) for Component output versus HDMI output. In fact, sometimes it's vice versa -- a well-calibrated Component will look better than poor-misadjusted HDMI.

However, more often than not, it is the case that HDMI blows away Component. It has often been the observation, that this specific case, indeed happens on several Comcast boxes.

Both of you are correct in very certain situations, even though you are disagreeing.

mariod

join:2009-06-16

1 edit
reply to GTFan

Even if your completely baseless assertion is true, it's a truly horrendous expenditure. Its three year old technology, basically the same stuff OP is complaining about Comcast giving him.

And your liability buying a Tivo on craigslist apparently doesn't need to be calculated? Nor the crazy $700 upfront investment?

Everytime my DVR stops working, Comcast swaps it out for free. Good luck with your $700 in used equipment from a random stranger.

And Tivo HD is not Tivo Premiere, so I assume it won't have on Demand (hence this is a total red herring in your argument).



Caddyroger
Premium
join:2001-06-11
To the west
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 edit

said by mariod:

Even if your completely baseless assertion is true, it's a truly horrendous expenditure.
Its three year old technology, basically the same stuff OP is complaining about Comcast giving him.

And your liability buying a Tivo on craigslist apparently doesn't need to be calculated? Nor the crazy $700 upfront investment?

Everytime my DVR stops working, Comcast swaps it out for free. Good luck with your $700 in used equipment from a random stranger.

And Tivo HD is not Tivo Premiere, so I assume it won't have on Demand (hence this is a total red herring in your argument).

That 3 year old tivo has HDMI that op is wanting, it has Pandora, netflix and hulu plus. There are only 3 thing that goes wrong with a Tivo hard drive, power supply or fan. If half knowing yourself aroung you can fix it your self. With the premiere you can have up to 4tb of storage space I believe. I can download unprotected shows from the tv and store it on my computer.
I have a s3, premiere and a premiere elite with no problems with any of them. Comcast would have to pay to use junk slow ass dvrs. I would get pissed off at the comcast dvr and throw the remote at it and hit the tv destroying it

--
Caddy

mariod

join:2009-06-16

1 edit

said by Caddyroger:

That 3 year old tivo has HDMI that op is wanting, it has Pandora, netflix and hulu plus. There are only 3 thing that goes wrong with a Tivo hard drive, power supply or fan. If half knowing yourself aroung you can fix it your self. With the premiere you can have up to 4tb of storage space I believe. I can download unprotected shows from the tv and store it on my computer.
I have a s3, premiere and a premiere elite with no problems with any of them. Comcast would have to pay to use junk slow ass dvrs. I would get pissed off at the comcast dvr and throw the remote at it and hit the tv destroying it

So it has a bunch of stuff you have to pay even more for. Sounds great!!!

And all it will cost you is like $1000 up front. Why not just invest in some swampland while you're at it.


Caddyroger
Premium
join:2001-06-11
To the west
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 edit

said by mariod:

said by Caddyroger:

That 3 year old tivo has HDMI that op is wanting, it has Pandora, netflix and hulu plus. There are only 3 thing that goes wrong with a Tivo hard drive, power supply or fan. If half knowing yourself aroung you can fix it your self. With the premiere you can have up to 4tb of storage space I believe. I can download unprotected shows from the tv and store it on my computer.
I have a s3, premiere and a premiere elite with no problems with any of them. Comcast would have to pay to use junk slow ass dvrs. I would get pissed off at the comcast dvr and throw the remote at it and hit the tv destroying it

So it has a bunch of stuff you have to pay even more for. Sounds great!!!

And all it will cost you is like $1000 up front. Why not just invest in some swampland while you're at it.

Where are you getting $1000. at. I have not paid paid over $650 with lifetime for the highest one up front. That 33 months at comcast dvr prices but with comcast I am still paying $19.00 for their junk dvrs after 33 months. If you have Netflix then it is free with the premieres.
Most likely the the swampland is hell a lot better the comcast drvs.
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Caddy